Customer Reviews for

A Darker Place (Anne Waverly Series #1)

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
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  • Posted September 25, 2011

    Wow! A real page turner

    This is an excellent story, and really pulls the reader in. It is also very dark, in more ways than one. I highly recommend it and feel that I have discovered a great story teller in Laurie King.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    Highly Recommended--a must read!

    Having read Laurie R. King's Mary Russel/Sherlock Holmes series, I was not disappointed! King really knows how to develop her characters. The story has so many twists and turns, leaving you wanting to keep reading to the very end without stopping. The sexually explicit scene was totally unnecessary to the plot, in my opinion. Nevertheless, I am looking forward to reading more in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A strong potboiler

    A strong potboiler from author Laurie R. King.

    A college professor who is an expert in 'cult' religious organizations and their operation, gets 'selected' by the FBI for undercover work in an Arizona based religious group. She has done this job before, sometimes not so successfully. Her own past is muddied with unresolved conflicts over events that took her family (husband and young daughter) from her.

    The assignment turns much more personal when the first person she meets in Arizona is a young girl that strongly resembles her own lost daughter! Can she separate the personal issues from the job she was sent to do?

    I found myself very engaged in the characters and the plot. What exactly makes a religious group a cult? What is just acceptable fervor and what crosses the line? I especially liked how the story took us inside the group, adding a human face to a subject too often publicly reported in glaring horrific headlines. These and other provoking questions are raised as the story moves forward. I hope the author plots another story with the same main characters.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    Emma

    She watched curiously.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2013

    Bethany

    Follows

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 19, 2011

    Not an easy read but worthwhile. Lots to ponder.

    In this novel, King creates a world that will be unfamiliar to most of us. The story follows its own unique path, building a sense that there are things here that we don't want to know, yet there they are, just below the surface of the action. King, a skilled writer, weaves fact with fiction and uses this growing sense of discomfort to keep us hanging on, looking forward to the next revelation. King has chosen a fascinating and unusual way of introducing each section of the story. She uses headings taken from a book written in 1652 about "alchymie," in archaic English that she has modernized. The headings, the definitions of the headings, and the "Notes from Anne Waverly's Journal" throughout the novel, add much to its other-worldly feel. Readers who skip over these will lose some of the sense of the novel. The central actor in this story, Professor Anne Waverly, teaches undergraduate courses in religion, and occasionally works incognito with the FBI, primarily in breaking up cults. She is now risking her mental equilibrium and possibly even her life, to become Ana Wakefield, and go undercover to find the truth about an unusual cult-like organization called Change. The commune/cult-what it really is is unclear-is named after its founder, who calls himself Steven Change. Each of the members is searching for some sort of change in his or her life, some for themselves, some for their children as well. When she gets to know two children, one a teen, the other a small girl who reminds her of her dead daughter, both grab Ana's heart and become central to her thoughts and actions. Ana carefully and gradually immerses herself in the odd, mysterious, and murky culture of Change and its quirky inhabitants, people of various ages and degrees of education and sophistication. The characters King places in the story are not just the people, but the place itself. For example, imagine a "meditation" room, huge, high ceilinged, along whose walls are platforms set at various heights, on which members sit during "meditation." All the property that encompasses Change is itself part of the action. Bit by bit, over the weeks, Ana watches and listens, works to gain the confidence of others in the group, snoops around the property, inside and out, when she can get away with it. Eventually she pieces together what she believes is happening within the walls of Change. She then sets about to learn whether what she surmises is actually what it is. Soon enough, she realizes that it is up to her to get the two youngsters out of the commune and the danger she suspects it poses. From beginning to end, the reader senses that there is a real threat to Ana, not just a physical one, but that the memories of the loss of her family through another cult may affect her judgment in ways that can put her and the two children in jeopardy. King leads the reader through the maze to a conclusion that maintains suspense until the last sentence. When I finished A Darker Place, I had not only had an interesting and engaging experience in Anna/Ana's world, but had many a philosophical discourse with myself, learned a good deal about alchemy and science, cults and what they are and are not-and what may inspire people to attempt to hide themselves away from the world. I hope you'll have a similar reading experience. It's not an easy book, but one well worth the time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2009

    Twists and Turns

    This book really develops the back story of the main character, Anne Waverly, someone who was once a cult member but left, and lost her daughter and husband. Thought not an FBI agent, she is investigating for them a "new age" religious cult in the Southwest, but ends up following two children to one of the branches to England. She becomes deeply emeshed as she begins to care about two children in the cult, one of whom reminds her of her daughter. It was a page-turner, with complex development and highly enjoyable. It was the first book I read by the author, and promptly went to purchase 3 more. I would love for the author to continue to write about this character.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2007

    I loved this book!

    This book was outstanding. I especially loved the heroine, an ex-cult member, who is now helping the FBI to prevent tragedies like WACO from happening.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2005

    must read all of her books

    Love Love Love this author. Highly recommended...ALL of her books are soo interesting! Have loved every major character in the three series she has written. Am looking forward to more!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2002

    DARK AND DARKER

    This book is absolutely terrifying. Good grief, it gives insight into a cult practice that I'm not sure that I wanted to know. I did notice a comman theme with King's book 'Folly,' that is, widow with loss of a child, an outside topic that drives the action, and always the process of looking into the inner self. Not Stephen King dark, but dark!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2000

    A Darker Place, How Was It?

    A Darker place was a very inspiring book about an x-cult member who helps out the F.B.I. see if some cults in the U.S.A. are going to blow-up in our faces. This book takes an interesting look at cults in America and how they affect non-cult people as a whole. In-deepth phychology and reflections make you want to give Anne Waverly advice on her dangerous mission. This book highly recomended by mio and by many newspapers and magazines.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2010

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