Customer Reviews for

Darwin's Children (Darwin Series #2)

Average Rating 3.5
( 19 )
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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    powerfultale of evolution

    Eleven years ago the scattered human endogenous viral activation (SHEVA) retrovirus caused mutations leading to the birth of a different human species (see DARWIN¿S RADIO). Instead of welcoming the genetically enhanced humans, the old generation, many of which are the parents of these kids, fears and detests their offspring. Much of the phobia comes from the unknown, but also from the propaganda beat that these new humans will ravage the old race. The government established special laws and agencies to keep these children uneducated and targeted for death for almost anything. There remain small cells of non-enhanced humans who want to do the right thing with the preadolescents that are growing up in isolation. Amongst this minority, scientists Kaye Lang and Mitch Rafelson, live in exile under the watchful eye of Big Brother yet still quietly raise their daughter, Stella, a SHEVA child, who seeks her own kind. If EMAC finds her, the camps or death will occur and the current suburban Virginia exile of Kaye and Mitch will seem mainstream compared with what the Feds would do to them. Readers will better enjoy this seemingly stand-alone novel if they first peruse DARWIN¿S RADIO, where the evolution began. The theme of DARWIN¿S CHILDREN and the previous book is frightening especially with the counterinsurgency and negative reaction as if the children were devils. Though much of the latter half of the plot depends on luck and coincidence, fans of deep tales with strong scientific roots and powerful messages will relish this novel of the old humans trying to keep the new enhanced species from dominating the future. Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2003

    Another GREAT Read from a Master

    Darwin¿s Children by Greg Bear. To be released April 1, 2003. Review copy. In this sequel to his Nebula Award-winning Darwin's Radio, Earth seems to have changed forever with the birth of millions of naturally genetically altered babies to virus (SHEVA) infected mothers some 12 years previous in `Radio¿. Maybe these children are the next great human evolutionary leap, but normal or `old¿ humans fear, and hate them. Most of the `virus children¿ have been taken from their parents and homes to be kept in Government managed `schools¿, which are, for the most part, converted prison properties, in order to manage them and keep them isolated from the general public. Many of the central characters in `Children¿ are carried forward from `Radio¿, and as is Bear¿s strength, the development of character, sense of place, and the feel and smell of human the frailties of fear and hatred are completely engaging. Reading `Radio¿ first is NOT a requirement but doing so will give the reader a welcome leg up on many of the events opening in progress in `Children¿. As has been noted by other reviewers, this book may not be as hugely `pop¿ular as a Cook or a Crichton, but it is far better written as a thinking person¿s novel. Bear¿s background lends to credible science and his talent as a writer bring us a depth of story, and a steady building of tension and excitement as the story rolls, whips, and tears along until, just when you think you have a grip, he introduces a totally unexpected twist. So different from a Koontz pull-an-alien-out-of-a-hat style, or a Cook or Crichton mega-thriller, what-rampant-science-can-do, pulse-pounder backed up by science (who can resist the premise of bringing dinosaurs back to life!), Greg bear develops characters, global plots, empathy, sympathy, and thought provoking ideas with style and feeling. I have been a big Bear fan since way before his inauguration into the `Killer B¿s¿ club and this book is one of the many reasons. `Nuf said. Read the book. I smell another award! rdkedd@abnormalbooks.com

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2014

    Well-written Hard Biology Scifi

    But, in case you didn't know...evolution does not act in the way he decsribes. Oops.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2004

    amazing

    This novel deserves nothing less than five stars. Bear is a superb storyteller with a real gift for characterization and suspense. The story is disturbing, chilling, and clings to you long after you've finished it.

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    Posted August 12, 2010

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