Customer Reviews for

The Dawkins Delusion?: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine

Average Rating 3.5
( 11 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 11 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted February 3, 2009

    Another fake ex-atheist

    The moment a so-called ex-atheist writes about atheists being god-haters is the moment they prove they have never understood the atheist mind. They were, at best, weak Christians/theists. You have to believe in a god in order to hate it, that would make the god-haters actual believers or theists, not atheists. This is a projection of the Christian mind. Why they would pose as ex-atheists? It is to try and add false authority to their statements about atheists. This is just another way Christians have found to tell us who and what we are instead of just asking us.

    17 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2010

    Dawkins is deluded!

    This was a very simple and concise analysis of Dawkins' approaches/arguments in the God Delusion. While McGrath doesn't really make a case for religion, he does point out the extreme bias and denial Dawkins makes in his writings. I encourage everyone to read this and understand how fundamentalism exists in all worldviews, including atheism, and no matter how much one wants their view to be correct, if evidence is ignored there simply is no case.
    McGrath certainly casts a distasteful light on Dawkins (no doubt because of Dawkins' radical and often unsupported statements). That is the only problem I had with this book. Nonetheless, it's one to be read...it's precise, logical, and offers insightful interpretation for readers to knowingly analyze and sort out information others present.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Numerous errors in logic for such a short (90 page or so) book

    Early in the book, atheists are referred to as God haters. Sigh, if the authors meant this literally, then they have a lot to learn about atheism. Atheism is non-belief in a deity. You cannot hate someone you don't believe in. I am not sure if that line was just a throw away line of red meat to appeal to those who dislike atheists to begin with. After all many Christian conservatives are actually of the opinion that atheists really do believe in a deity but they are just denying it so they can engage in immoral or amoral actions. Which of course is total rubbish but common among the rightwing who views nonbelievers as cowards on a battlefield, ie, "no atheists in foxholes."

    The authors disagree with Dawkins (and mine) that faith is belief in something without evidence. But, the authors give no evidence in counter to this position. I hear some Christian apologists (such as the authors of this book) who take a more intellectual view of religion, but as Dawkins and a number of atheists have pointed out, the more intellectual view of religion is in the distinct minority. So, when Dawkins, Hitchens etc are citicizing religion they are actually criticizing the real religious views of the majority of Christians. The Christian right is (unfortunately) a powerful institution and their beliefs and how they impact society are definately up for criticism. Views of a few Christian PhDs in theology who have no political power are just not relevent in the "cultural wars" of greater society as those who follow Pat Robertson. Lastly, this book is marked at $17 for a short 90 page book? It should be half that cost at that. It's more of a long essay.

    The authors agree that the "god of the gaps" argument (which says something in nature can only be explained by a deity) is wrong because it has proven time and time again to be wrong. See, god of the gaps was once used to explain volcanos, earthquakes etc. Indeed, the Christian right still often blame well explained and well known natural events on a deity's wrath. They do this in lieu of say, reading a science book. But, the authors of this book ask why should explanations work? Basically why can we have the ability to explain action x through say the scientific method. To me it is real simple. We observe a natural event and all the data we can observe about it. We can test it through various experiments. That a tornado is two different air temperature pockets (simplistic rendering of course) meeting and how we can observe this by observation somehow is proof or evidence or shows the necessity of a deity I have no idea. Not only do I disagree with this, I can't even understand the logic behind the belief.

    The authors mention the argument against a deity by Dawkins (and others) that a deity would very probably be more complex then what he created. Such as the universe of life. This argument is not really challenged but dodged, a common occurence throughout the book. I will give the book two stars because next to some on the Christian right, this is a much better or written book.

    4 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The Choir

    An interesting read if you are already informed on Richard Dawkins and his works.

    4 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2010

    Concise and insightful read

    This author outlines and documents the changing tone in Richard Dawkins' successive books. He is even-handed about the problematic issues raised in the Watchmaker, but fairly criticizes Dawkins as his philosophy and supposition move away from logical thought to the point where even atheists seek to distance themselves from him in The God Delusion. McGrath also accurately points out the logical flaws in Dawkin's theories, stated as fact, so this was a very enjoyable read for me. I highly recommend it.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 10, 2010

    The Truth At Last

    The McGrath team hit the nail right on the head about Dawkins!!! All Christians need to pray for his soul, which he so foolishly disregards.

    2 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Large gaps in logic are everywhere in this book. The author seem

    Large gaps in logic are everywhere in this book. The author seems to me to be another false ex- atheist.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2009

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    Posted March 22, 2011

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    Posted May 26, 2009

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    Posted November 24, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2009

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