Customer Reviews for

Days of Infamy (Pacific War Series #1)

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

I don't know what previous reviewers have against this book!

This is an extremely dramatic, highly interesting book. As a wife and mother of Japanese citizens, I particularly enjoyed it. Its only flaw is that a lot of the characters are not especially sympathetic. (To me, the Japanese ones tended to be more likeable than the A...
This is an extremely dramatic, highly interesting book. As a wife and mother of Japanese citizens, I particularly enjoyed it. Its only flaw is that a lot of the characters are not especially sympathetic. (To me, the Japanese ones tended to be more likeable than the Americans!) But to see American history turned on its head is thought-provoking.

posted by KeikoHP on September 12, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Engrossing, but w/loose ends and flaws

I've been a fan of Harry Turtledove's writings for 5 years, and while 'Days on Infamy' was engrossing and with fascinating characters, as is true of all his other titles, this one leaves much to be desired. As a couple of other reviewers have already pointed, you don't...
I've been a fan of Harry Turtledove's writings for 5 years, and while 'Days on Infamy' was engrossing and with fascinating characters, as is true of all his other titles, this one leaves much to be desired. As a couple of other reviewers have already pointed, you don't find out what happens to 90% of the characters. br P The unwrapped loose ends wouldn't be so bad if it were evident that Turtledove intended this to be the first installment in a series (a la 'The Great War' and 'Settling Accounts' trilogies) but the author gives no such indication rather, this appears to be a stand-alone novel with no plans for a sequel. br P There is also one scene in partucular that struck me, as an active-duty military officer AND a military history buff to boot, as being non-sensical: the scene in which Japanese Army Corporal Shimuzu, taking his troops for a night out on the town, requires his men to salute NCOs and not just commissioned officers. I know of NO military, past or present, that requires enlisted men to salute NCOs (excpet during certain ceremonious occasions such as guardmount/open ranks inspections). Yes, the Imperial Japanese Army was very disciplinarian and elitist, but I seriously doubt that they'd flout long-standing S.O.P. military tradition, customs, and courtesies in that manner! br P That said, the battle scenes are thrilling, and the characters, Japanese and American alike, grab your attention. As someone who has several second and third-generation Japanese-American friends, I can feel for characters like Kenzo 'Ken' Takahashi who are struggling to gain acceptance as real Americans, while I'm disgusted with the cavalier and dictator-coddling attitude of Ken's father Jiro, who's been reaping the benefits and freedoms of living in America for so long yet is completely ingrateful for said freedoms to the point that he openly kisses up to the Imperial Japanese occupiers. br P The ending is disturbing to say the least and makes you really stop and think, 'What if?' And as an American whose father served in the USMC in WWII and whose mother endured Tojo's brutal occupation of the Philippines from 1941-45, it makes me thank God that much more that things did NOT really turn out as envisioned in Turtledove's novel, and thank God that Tojo's evil, despotic regime was ultimately defeated.

posted by Anonymous on March 10, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2007

    Not even half a story

    I love alternative history and I keep hearing that Turtledove is the master of the genere. From what I can see it's nonsense. There was 150 pages of great story in this book. Unfortunately the novel was more than 500 pages long. The entire book does little but set up what must be a three or four book series. There are far too many characters with too many elaborate background stories and the plot grinds to a halt. One of the stories is the riveting tale of a woman growing sweet potatoes! Turtledove is also extremely selective about the 'reality' he brings in. He beats the reader over the head with the superiority of the Zero over the Wildcat [mentioning it more than ten times] but fails to bring in the Allies breaking of the Japanese naval code [JN25] or the Japanese navy's eternal search for the 'ultimate battleship showdown'. Both of these should have come into the story. Still, if Turtledove would stop trying to drag the story out into a cash cow trilogy he might be able to tell a passable story. As it is don't waste your time and money on this mess.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2004

    Alternative Book Needed For This Alternative View

    This is the first and last Turtledove novel that I purchased. While I find the concept of alternative history interesting, it is nevertheless still a 'story.' The author takes an inordinate amount of time setting up the central cast of characters, to the point that you literally develop a vested interest in their plot lines, only to be left at the end of the book not knowing what happens to 90% of them. The concept, of an actual Japanese landing force in the Hawaiian islands is intriguing, as that is what the U.S. was truly concerned about after the real attack in 1941. Buying and reading this book left me with the same feeling that I would have if I just had a restaurant waiter come back and tell me my credit card was over the limit: I would be confused and embarassed about the whole situation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2005

    Not the usual Turtledove brilliance

    I am an avid fan of Harry Turtledove, and I especially enjoyed his 'World War' and 'Great War' stories. I was expecting brilliance when I purchased this book. Instead, I found a rather dull and boring story. I suspect that Turtledove began this book with high hopes but quite frankly, didn't know how to end it. Stay away from this one!

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