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De-Coding Da Vinci: The Facts Behind the Fiction of The Da Vinci Code

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2006

    I think its a stupid book - decoding da vinci

    I think people following the church just want the world to follow them as they want all the power's.So i think the book The Da Vinci Code clearly mentions what the intentions were of the people who started the practice of the church. I am with Dan Brown and his work in finding the fact and things which were kept away from the world by the people of church.I respect Dan Brown for his work and also the great Leonardo Ser Pieri Da Vincio (Leonardo Da Vinci)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2006

    Bravo!

    This is a well thought response to the most obvious mistakes in the Da Vinci Code. The fact that the writer is Catholic should not invalidate her observations - ANYONE who is familiar with the New Testament and/or church history can spot the historical and theological inaccuracies presented by Brown. This genre is needed because the beliefs presented in the Da Vinci Code ARE Dan Brown's beliefs, as he readily espouses in interviews. The Da Vinci Code is a very entertaining, fast-paced murder mystery - a good read. Books like De-Coding Da Vinci are important so that the public realizes that artistic license to the utmost extreme was taken to add intrigue to this novel. It's OK as long as everyone knows it's just that - a work of fiction.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2005

    skip this one

    I purchased this book hoping for an unbiased examination of the assertions made in the da Vinci Code, many of which stood in the face of my traditional Catholic upbringing. What I found was an obviously exasperated and sarcastic slam of Brown's book. Clearly the author is distressed by the novel and couldn't wait to get her two cents in, based on her obvious devout Christian beliefs. If you are looking for clear comparison of the novel and historical fact, skip this book. There are many better written works on the subject.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2004

    Skimming some $s off a successful work of fiction

    ...this must be the conclusion about this book. The summary dismissal of some of the ideas presented in the 'Da Vinci Code' and claim to the truth by this author are staggering. It is more telling to focus on what is not being refuted than to give credibility to the 'correct' view as presented in this work of an alternate fiction. As Dan Brown discusses in his novel, faith is not about absolute truth, and hence, where religious beliefs override rational thought, there is no debate over 'right' or 'wrong', just belief and disbelief. From a marketing perspective, an immaculately executed money-grab.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2004

    Is that really what happened?

    Amy Welborn gives a great overview of the issues that those who read the Da Vinci Code or saw the ABC special on the same topic are left wondering. Here is a well researched presentation that is both easy and enjoyable to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2004

    More Fun Than the Novel

    I greatly enjoyed Dan Brown¿s *Da Vinci Code* but I have to admit that Amy Welborn¿s book was even more fun. With a delightful style and large doses of irony she analyzes Brown¿s claims: That Constantine selected the books of the New Testament and invented the divinity of Christ. That the early Church covered up Jesus¿ marriage to Mary Magdalene. That Jesus had designated her as the leader of his movement and that she in fact is the Holy Grail. While these claims seem quite exciting, Amy shows that the truth is much better. The controversy over *The Da Vinci Code* provides an opportunity to learn the facts about Christian origins. Skepticism is good both for Christians and non-Christians. Amy¿s book will help any honest inquirer. Read it and decide for yourself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2004

    Just the facts ....

    The ABC TV special on the DaVinci Code pretty much de-bunked Brown's claims point by point. If you didn't see the TV special, or saw it and want more information, a well-researched, scholarly and very readable exploration of the best-seller is this one by Amy Welborn.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2004

    Excellent...

    ***** To say Dan Brown stirred up a hornet's nest when he wrote 'The Da Vinci Code' would be an understatement. More than one Christian has found themselves being cornered by someone asking some variant of 'so, what's this about Jesus and Mary?' and it takes a little more than faith to answer them. One needs to be able to refute the historical fallacies and fictions purported as fact in the best seller. To do this, you can either spend a few hours of research on the various aspects or buy this book. Don't be fooled by its brevity. No words are wasted in making a big impact. The facts are well researched and linked to historical texts for further exploration; and each chapter concludes with discussion questions, making it ideal for group study. Much like Strobel's 'Case' series, Amy Welborn presents a clear picture in an entertaining and informative fashion. *****

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2004

    Refreshing to hear something serious

    Once upon a time a President (Clinton) committed American foreign policy based on the insights of a travelogue ('Balkan Ghosts') and we also won't now discuss the Iraqi WMD debate, though it might be suspected that Tom Clancy is a major and favorite source for terrorism techniques and threats. So-called 'legal' thrillers are even worse, when attorney-writers, who've never practiced or tried any cases, scribble stories, which everyone then buys and reads, convincing themselves that they now understand American justice. Unfortunately, 'DaVinci Code' fits into these phenomena. Ms Welborn is a much followed Catholic blogger, an intellectual, and in this work she debunks all the hype, half-truths, and silly fabrications of the DVC. Sticking to the text, which is after all only an adventure, she surveys the art and theology and history, lucidly and directly and without apology. She does not accuse author Brown of anti-Catholicism, but she might argue that anti-Catholicism is the last acceptable prejudice, the anti-Semitism of the Elite Left. Sadly and futilely, one can only hope that many many people will read this book as a companion to DVC.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2004

    Easy read stating the facts

    I enjoyed reading the book stating the record straight. There are references at the end of each chapter which are handy to further go into the different issues raised by Brown.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2004

    Everything you need to know!

    A really handy book to answer the question you and your friends have about 'The Da Vinci Code.' It's thorough, but not intimidating at all. It's not critical of people who may have liked the book, either. This book tells the truth in a way that's really digestible and learned at the same time. *And* it covers all the issues people are interested in, including the art of Leonardo da Vinci, which not all of the other books in this genre do.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2004

    A Fine Read

    This is a fine read and answered some of the questions I had about the book. Unlike some of the other books in this genre, it is not preachy and/or dogmatic. Welborn gives you a sense of some objectivity. So why only 3 stars. Well, first I am looking for a book that answers all of my questions, not just the religious questions (although she did discuss the Leonardo's paintings and the Prior Sion). Second, I was hoping for a bit more detail in the book. Welborn made her points quickly and moved on to her next argument. While this may be good to some, I was hoping for more elaboration. Third, although Welborn wants to look at these issues objectivity, I feel some of the language in the book and her beliefs may cloud some of her objectivity. Finally, I understand why books in this genre are being written. Popular culture definately influences the thoughts of many people. However, Welborn (and maybe some of the other authors in the DaVinci Debuking business) writes as if the DaVinci Code is an argument for an alternative history. The DaVinci Code is FICTION, not a peer reviewed Scientific journal article. Dan Brown is NOT making an argument in the book and is not making assertions. None of the ideas in the book are Brown's ideas, and he is up front with that. I think the authors in this genre are wasting their time attacking Brown. Like I said, none of these ideas are Browns theories or 'assertions' (as Welborn states some often); these are assertions and theories of other writers. I wish the authors would spend time attacking those books (Holy Blood, Holy Grail etc), not the DaVinci Code. All Brown has done is take some interesting (maybe outrageous) ideas from others and put them into and intriquing story.

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