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Deadly Feasts: The ''Prion'' Controversy and the Public's Health

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2001

    the reality of science

    I have read almost all of Rhodes' books and find him consistently a compelling presenter of both the science and humanity of his subjects. Carleton Gajdusek certainly comes through as the deserving Nobel prize winning hero of this tale. His description of how Prions survive for years against treatment that kills all viruses to go around the immune system and kill 100% of its victims inexorably and excruciatingly make AIDS and Ebola seem wimpy, and makes one think seriously of becoming a vegetarian!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 17, 2014

    Haven't read it yet, but looks promising.

    I purchased for a later read. I can't review yet, but it looks to be a great read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2008

    An omen of a future disaster

    I saw this book in the stores when it came out and overlooked it. I was in grave error. When I finally purchased this book, I was enthrawled and horrified at the same time. Deadly feasts focuses on prion diseases that causes the brain to turn to what the author refers to as 'swiss cheese'. Such diseases appear to have come from cannibalism in various forms. Some knowing, some unknowing. They have been passed into the human gene pool in the western world through tissue transplants, dental work and the consumption of infected foods. If this sounds scary, it should. What is worse, is the research indicates one can have a prion disease like vCJD for decades before it displays symptoms. And when it does, time has run out. With no such cure yet, and many cases of vCJD still to be revealed, this could be an epidemic of disastrous proportions. Are you sure your food is safe?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2003

    A Great Read

    Deadly feasts is a not only a great read but it is easy to follow as well as deeply scientific. A good read for someone interested in public health.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2003

    If you believe it can't happen here...

    Then the truth about the American food-processing industry will terrify you. It is not as though these new bugs are a theory or a doomsayer's concoction-- They are real, as are their victims. While Deadly feasts doesn't go overboard into the nature of agribusiness, I strongly recommend as a companion to this book "Fast Food Nation" by Eric Schlosser. Between these 2 works, it becomes apparent that the damage may well have already been done. In a book (and movie)by the late Dr Carl Sagan, one character describes our fascination with technology and science and materialism. He asks if, as the result of "science" we, as a species, are more happy, more fulfilled. A rhetorical question, but reading Deadly Feasts actually provides one answer. Perhaps a re-read of Mary Shelly's classic would be helpful too...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2000

    You'll never eat the same again

    Excellent review of prion diseases and their impact which crosses across species barriers. The implications of modern farming practices on human health are potentially enormous due to these agents. One may or may not trust Mr. Rhodes' assertions, but one will never look at meat the same again. This is a well-written book and definitely worth reading.

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    Posted May 31, 2010

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    Posted February 13, 2013

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    Posted January 1, 2010

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    Posted January 7, 2010

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