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Death by China: Confronting the Dragon - A Global Call to Action

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Conquer the Consuming Dragon!

The United States to any astute observer has become a nation dealing with the after-effects of multiple disasters, some natural and some very man-made in nature. What is sorely lacking is a large dose of preventative measures meant to restore our economic, military, soc...
The United States to any astute observer has become a nation dealing with the after-effects of multiple disasters, some natural and some very man-made in nature. What is sorely lacking is a large dose of preventative measures meant to restore our economic, military, social, psychological, cultural, educational, etc. leadership throughout the world. That usually means preventing a problem from beginning; but in this well-researched, critical novel, the call is for individuals and the government of the United States to prevent China from destroying America. That sounds like a tall order, and yet these two passionate authors lay out past behavior, intentions and effects on many policies active between China and America that seem designed to enrich China and bring the United States to its knees!

Each chapter herein specifically covers how China is poisoning America. First, the authors describe how lethal fillers, additives, chemicals, and more are inserted into our food, furniture and drugs. Notice the emphasis on multiple specific examples. The specificity of these facts as one reads makes it all the more frightening. Who hasn't heard about poisoned drugs or wood for baby cribs?

Navarro and Autry next canvas China's increasing economic domination, a fact many have heard but fail to appreciate just how widespread this takeover has spanned the American economy. Consider, as the authors advise, the elaborate web of illegal subsidies, the undervalued currency, piracy and theft of our intellectual property, massive environmental damage, lax health and safety standards, unlawful tariffs and more, protectionism, and more. Very often, our business and political leaders are aware this is happening but claim to be helpless to stop it. As one reads more and more, one questions and wonders how we have reached this point.

Then one might be more horrified after reading about China's theft of our technology, including manufacturing, space programs, financial systems, and national secrets. If one hasn't previously believed this was a deliberate conspiracy, by now one cannot with a level amount of thinking believe otherwise. On and on it goes. Finally, however, the authors offer a chapter with multiple suggestions for American individuals to take in demanding our government respond to these nightmarish scenarios, as well as offering leaders a path to restore our country's economy, intellectual, military, and political future to a position of strength rather than victimized weakness that spells out the potential for America's total demise.

Death in China is a moving, passionate, and gripping wake-up call to American citizens and leaders. According to the authors of this book about the decline of America, it is not too late to change our American journey from its present complacency to a vigorous stance leading to success and prosperity.

Very nicely done and sure to be debated everywhere and by anyone who reads Death At China.

posted by literarymuseVC on June 20, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Too sensational

I was really looking forward to reading this book because I work in the solar industry which is being decimated by the Chinese. However, this book read with too much sensation and not enough credible sources. I am surprised that too professors would not keep to a more...
I was really looking forward to reading this book because I work in the solar industry which is being decimated by the Chinese. However, this book read with too much sensation and not enough credible sources. I am surprised that too professors would not keep to a more professional and academic tone rather than a Micheal Moore style.

posted by AnthologyDC on October 13, 2012

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  • Posted October 13, 2012

    Too sensational

    I was really looking forward to reading this book because I work in the solar industry which is being decimated by the Chinese. However, this book read with too much sensation and not enough credible sources. I am surprised that too professors would not keep to a more professional and academic tone rather than a Micheal Moore style.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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