Customer Reviews for

Den Of Thieves

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2013

    Direwolf

    "Isn't it great?" She asks. The den was small, but still quite spacious. There was a large bed made or pelts and moss, a small pool of water in the back.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2006

    Gripping Insider Account

    This classic account of insider trading during the greed decade remains as riveting today as the day it was published. Prize-winning journalist James B. Stewart manages to turn an account of the arcane market manipulation that led to the 1987 crash into a page-turner with all the suspense of a detective novel. And while the main villains here - Michael Milken and Ivan Boesky - have faded off the public radar, their philosophical descendants at Enron, Tyco and Adelphia remind investors that greed and market manipulation will never go out of style. Stewart¿s richly detailed book is must reading for those who trust their careers or their savings to the markets. We recommend this withering account of over-the-top greed to anyone who works or invests on Wall Street.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2003

    Greed is constant, only the names change

    Two interesting themes run through Stewart's book. One is that greed and corruption ran riot in the 1980s, only to get caught in the law-enforcement net. Yet the book's hopeful 'crime doesn't pay' message does not mesh with the 1990s, when greed and corruption reached even higher levels. The second theme is about what lesson was learned from Milken's escapades. Stewart tries to argue that Wall Street got carried away, but then how to explain the '90s? The real lesson learned on Wall Street is that sometimes an employee is TBTF - Too Big To Fire. Milken's power within Drexel was so great that CEO Fred Joseph could not save the firm from bankruptcy once Milken's crimes came under scrutiny. To fire Milken would have destroyed the firm because Milken's allies at Drexel were so powerful. To defend Milken compromised the firm and thus sowed the seeds of its destruction as well. The message to CEO's in America was: no subordinate should be TBTF. Only the CEO should be TBTF. Underlings like Fastow, Sullivan, Grubman, Blodget and Quattrone were quickly thrown overboard. One can only hope that when the scandals of the late '90s have played out that Skilling, Lay, Ebbers et. al. end up behind bars.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1