Customer Reviews for

The Devil's Bones (Body Farm Series #3)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Not the best, but still strong

While The Devil's Bones, the third forensic thriller by two-person authorial team Jefferson Bass, does not quite live up to the high standard set by previous entries, it's still a compelling read. This time, a pair of cases challenge Dr. Bill Brockton's investigative a...
While The Devil's Bones, the third forensic thriller by two-person authorial team Jefferson Bass, does not quite live up to the high standard set by previous entries, it's still a compelling read. This time, a pair of cases challenge Dr. Bill Brockton's investigative acumen: the death of a woman whose charred remains are discovered in a burned-out car, and a shady Georgia crematorium with some really unconscionable business practiced. If all that weren't enough, the nefarious Garland Hamilton (last seen in 2007's Flesh and Bone) shows up to cause more trouble. Some reviewers have complained that Bass muddied the plot of this mystery by throwing in everything but the proverbial kitchen sink, and that's a valid complaint. By way of comparison, my favorite new thriller of '08 - Crimson Orgy by Austin Williams - weaves a tight narrative that grows more claustrophobic and suspenseful with each chapter. The Devil's Bones could arguably have benefited from some tightening, but fans of the series will still want to give this one a look.

posted by Anonymous on March 3, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Boo

You might know harriet klausner has to come along a stick her nose in and ruin this book. Come on bn, when are you ever going to do something to this egotistical plot spoiling poster? She consistently reveals every detail including the ending of every book she reports. ...
You might know harriet klausner has to come along a stick her nose in and ruin this book. Come on bn, when are you ever going to do something to this egotistical plot spoiling poster? She consistently reveals every detail including the ending of every book she reports. Please ban her, delete all her posts and spare us from her plot spoilers. I cannot tell you how many books she has lost you sales on from ruined plot spoilers.

posted by 8888649 on August 22, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2008

    Not the best, but still strong

    While The Devil's Bones, the third forensic thriller by two-person authorial team Jefferson Bass, does not quite live up to the high standard set by previous entries, it's still a compelling read. This time, a pair of cases challenge Dr. Bill Brockton's investigative acumen: the death of a woman whose charred remains are discovered in a burned-out car, and a shady Georgia crematorium with some really unconscionable business practiced. If all that weren't enough, the nefarious Garland Hamilton (last seen in 2007's Flesh and Bone) shows up to cause more trouble. Some reviewers have complained that Bass muddied the plot of this mystery by throwing in everything but the proverbial kitchen sink, and that's a valid complaint. By way of comparison, my favorite new thriller of '08 - Crimson Orgy by Austin Williams - weaves a tight narrative that grows more claustrophobic and suspenseful with each chapter. The Devil's Bones could arguably have benefited from some tightening, but fans of the series will still want to give this one a look.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 14, 2011

    I recommend

    This is the first time I have read any of Jefferson Bass' books and I really enjoyed it. I have ordered the next two books in this series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Thrilling Read

    This book is great, especially if you enjoy a scientific base to your average murder mystery. Although it is part of a series, it has many stand alone qualities; I have not read Jefferson Bass' other books, and this was still completely understandable. It is a great book for all forensic anthropology enthusiasts!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2008

    Bass throws in too many bones

    In this third 'Body Farm' thriller, Jefferson Bass juggles three different plotlines, and the result is a mystery that is diluted by one too many of them. Not only does the series' hero, forensic anthropologist Dr. Bill Brockton, have two different cases to investigate, he's also dealing with the before-trial escape of his nemesis, former medical examiner Garland Hamilton, who murdered Brockton's lover and then tried to frame him in 'Flesh and Bone'. Hamilton's body is eventually discovered in the smoking ruin of a cabin where he was hiding out, but Brockton is not so sure it's him. Meanwhile, the charred remains of a woman named Mary Latham have been found in a burned-out car, and an out-of-state crematorium has apparently simply dumped the bodies of it's customers' loved ones instead of properly cremating them. I think 'The Devil's Bones' would have been a lot stronger if Bass had concentrated on the Hamilton storyline, throwing more twists and turns in that direction, while giving forensics fans something to chew on with a tighter Latham investigation and ditching the crematorium subplot entirely. Still, this is a step up (in my opinion) from the recent Scarpetta novels, not to mention the less-than-compelling Temperance Brennan books.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2014

    Another hit in the Bone Farm series

    Another hit in the Bone Farm series

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2013

    reliably fun

    Not great, but good.

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  • Posted October 4, 2013

    Love

    I love these books.

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  • Posted January 27, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    I loved reading this one! It was full of suspense and thrills to keep me turning the pages!

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  • Posted March 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed for Midwest Book Review

    Forensic anthropologist Bill Brockton is trying to figure out who murdered Mary Latham and how her car caught fire and burned so extensively when his criminal defense attorney gives him what are claimed to be the cremains (cremated remains) of his aunt, which look more like concrete mix than bone ash. With the help of forensic scientist Art Bohanan, Brockton investigates the crematorium in Georgia that was responsible for the cremation but keeps butting up against stone walls. Eventually, he discovers a horror the likes of which he has never seen before. Meanwhile, he learns that his nemesis, former medical examiner Garland Hamilton, has escaped from prison and is on the prowl. Knowing he's in Hamilton's sites, Brockton is relieved to learn Hamilton's charred body is discovered at a fire scene in Cooke County. However, as Brockton soon finds out, things are not always as they seem.

    This third installment in the Body Farm series is, as usual, chock full of interesting forensics information relayed through Brockton and his assistant, Miranda. Readers may find the book distracting as it seems to meander along from one investigation to the other, then dashes off to the conflict between Brockton and Hamilton. Although the three mysteries within the plot are good ones, perhaps focusing on one or two would provide a stronger read. The forensics investigations help buffer the distraction and will keep the reader invested throughout the book.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2008

    very good read

    If you're a fan of Patricia Cornwall and Kathy Reichs you'll like the team of Jefferson Bass

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    Posted November 21, 2012

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