Customer Reviews for

The Devil's Labyrinth

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

The Devil's Labyrinth

I have been reading his books since 1989 when I was in highschool. I think he is the best author around. I loved this book, along with all the others he has written. I cant wait to read the next one! I LOVE this man! Great job Mr. Saul

posted by Anonymous on September 5, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

Don't judge your opinion of John Saul as a writer by this novel, which is uncharacteristically poor for him. He's written much better. For example, try the Manhattan Hunt Club. I realize Saul does not spend a lot of time with characterization, which means most of the...
Don't judge your opinion of John Saul as a writer by this novel, which is uncharacteristically poor for him. He's written much better. For example, try the Manhattan Hunt Club. I realize Saul does not spend a lot of time with characterization, which means most of the people in his story lines fit into one tight little description. It's his fast-paced, intriguing plot lines that make his novels such page turners. So I tried not to get annoyed by his worn-out characterization of the grieving widow who is completely helpless without a big, strong man by her side, even though it felt insulting to all those women who carry on quite effectively raising their families and taking care of the homefront while their spouses are off serving their country. However, Saul's tired old theme of cold, harsh, and highly demented Catholic priests and nuns--although later we find out one of them is a demented Muslim-- has left me equally tired. My guess is that he had some bad experience with a leader in the Catholic church that he can't seem to get past. Are we to believe that the typical priest or nun would not think it odd that at least three seemingly normal teenagers, one who has lived at St. Isaacs for four years, are all in the clutches of the devil and need to be exorcised? Saul's plot lines often ask the reader to let go a bit on credulity, but this one is just way over the top. I'd pass on this one.

posted by Anonymous on May 6, 2008

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  • Posted February 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    What people do in the name of God

    Growing up without a father is tough enough but when sixteen year old Ryan McIntyre decides to do the right thing by acting like a man and standing up for himself he gets punished for it. Refusing to let a bully cheat of his test gets him beaten up so badly that his bleeding body feels terror at the thought of going back. His loving mother Teri reluctantly listens to her boyfriend Tom's advice about transferring Ryan to St. Isaac's Preparatory Academy,a Catholic school located in a grand structure with its own catacombs and dark labyrinths and with Tom's help secures a spot for her son. Ryan is a little distraught at the thought that the main reason why there was an opening is the mysterious and questionable death of the student whose bed he will sleep in, but he cannot go back to his old life and the bullies. Structure and rules should be his guiding light, uniforms and nuns, confessions and prayer his daily grind, but what Ryan doesn't know is that nothing is as it seems. Something rotten is trapped in the labyrinths and it's salivating at the thought of getting out. When the most popular young priest, Father Sebastian takes him under his wing, his life turns to worse, his friends start changing or disappearing and scrams and noises can be heard late at night. Ryan knows that something isn't right, the late night confessions and getting locked up in a secret chapel with a scary and angry looking Christ on the cross seem to affect those who come near it and pretty soon Ryan gets engulfed in it all. <BR/><BR/>Priests at the school are keen on practicing the long-lost rite to invoke the primitive evil from a possessed person, picking students who are haunted by evil and trying to get it out of them. It's important to the priests there to cleanse those who are bad since the school is known for taking in troubled youths. As their exorcism continue it seems that things are turning for the worse and not better, the students aren't really cleansed but instead they seem to become possessed even if they were fine before. Something or someone is taking advantage of the priests and their gullible enthusiasm for riding the world of evil, as they start to meddle with things that are bad and worst of all, real. Add to the mix their worried parents, Ryan's suspiciousness of his mother's suddenly overfriendly boyfriend who simply couldn't wait to get him out of the house and an Islamic group trying to target the visiting pope who decides to come and see these exorcisms take place. <BR/><BR/>Overall the book was exciting but some things were not explained; why certain people acted in specific manner and what drove them to it and why, what the silver cross from Ryan's father really was, and I wish there was more written about the catacombs and the labyrinth under the school, I felt like it contributed to the title more than to the story. As I was nearing the end, about 380 pages in I knew I had about 24 pages left and the whole book was still wide open, awaiting conclusion which took up about two pages. All this high pressure stuff happens, the trickery of the evil, changes in innocent children, false pretenses under which people acted, the deaths and the blood and gore and it took about 20 seconds of reading to get to the conclusion. I think it's a great way to kill a good book, people these days don't want to spend time reading a rich story to get a watered down ending. I liked how it ended but it was so lifeless that I was stunned, way too abrupt.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2008

    Good Read

    The book is an overall good read and keeps the reader guessing. While it is not the best John Saul book that I have read it is certainly an entertaining read. One thing that left me slightly disappointed was the ending. It was adequate but left me with a question or two.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2012

    Disappointed in the ending

    The main portion of the book was a decent read for John Saul, but the ending just drops you. Saul typically writes a very fast paced novel without deep character development. I liked reading the main portion of the book, finding myself unable to put the book down. However, the ending just ends. It is almost as if Saul had to turn in his book by a deadline and waited until the final hour to write th ending.

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  • Posted August 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Gruesome - Yet, not what I would consider "Horror"

    I have been reading John Saul's novels for a few years now, and I can usually get into them pretty easily. This book however, was a bit harder for me to enjoy. It is soley based on two religions, in which one man (or rather two) are defending theirs by bringing "evil" out of teenagers to satisy their god, and to make right of their ancestors past. I would say it would have been more interesting if Saul simply chose one subject (putting evil into people) rather than mixing it with two religions and going off of all that. It doesn't give readers enough time to enjoy the characters, and the plot. Anyway, John Saul fans may enjoy this book more than I did - I will however, contrinue to read his novels because I do enjoy them for the most part.

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    Posted December 12, 2008

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    Posted February 4, 2009

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    Posted December 15, 2011

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    Posted July 29, 2010

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