Customer Reviews for

Different . . . Not Less: Inspiring Stories of Achievement and Successful Employment from Adults with Autism, Asperger's, and ADHD

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted December 3, 2012

    The book would be good for a teen or perhaps even a young adult

    The book would be good for a teen or perhaps even a young adult on the spectrum to show them what others have been able to achieve in their lives. That said as a 50 something highly functioning adult on the spectrum I found the book depressing as the people in the book have achieved such high professional levels of achievement something I have never been able to come close to doing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2014

    The stories in this book represent a fairly wide range of experi

    The stories in this book represent a fairly wide range of experiences for people with Autism, Asperger's and ADHD.  
    Some of the individuals had happy, if mostly isolated childhoods, others struggled well into adulthood and some were still struggling
    (see Moppy's chapter). Some of the writers have had remarkable journeys and careers as they learned about themselves and
    what their gifts and talents are.  Not all of the writers immediately embraced their late diagnoses, however as Karla Fisher puts it,
    she came to realize it gave her a "framework…to understand her health and determine her quality of life".

    There were times I did need to put the book down because the difficulties were palpable and raw. However, I liked the way each
    contributor broke their stories into sections, and particularly appreciated the sections on mentors and life lessons, which hopefully
    readers can use to see what helped others succeed and navigate a world where they so often feel different. Temple makes
    some great points in the epilogue, where she states that it concerns her that young people who have autism now too often fixate on
    their autism, when they would be better off cultivating their special interests. She also states her point of view about the elimination of
    Asperger's Syndrome in the recent changes to the DSM-V in her final note. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2013

    I agree with the previous reviewer: for those of us discovering

    I agree with the previous reviewer: for those of us discovering our autism/Asperger's late in life, it is perhaps too late to start over.
    We tried our best, stumbling around in the dark, but a rather large number are trapped in poverty and disability, maybe even wards of the states without rights.  We have gifts, even advanced degrees, sometimes many advanced degrees, but scratch out an existence dependent on family or SS disability. So, yes, this book can add to our already large burden of guilt and failure. But for parents and for young girls and young women, it is NOT too late. So, for you, this may help inspire and guide you. For others, not necessarily.

    Good luck.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1