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Dilemma: A Priest's Struggle with Faith and Love

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

14 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

More Powerful Than the 95 Theses!

I read "Dilemma" in a single day. I can present the following excerpt from "Dilemma" to prove the hypocrisy that exists among the Catholic clergy: A lesbian goes to Confession where Father Cutie is presiding. She is extremely upset and crying. She tells Father Cutie tha...
I read "Dilemma" in a single day. I can present the following excerpt from "Dilemma" to prove the hypocrisy that exists among the Catholic clergy: A lesbian goes to Confession where Father Cutie is presiding. She is extremely upset and crying. She tells Father Cutie that she had gone to Confession to another priest and was scolded that she and her partner risk eternal salvation if their relationship continues. Father Cutie asked who told her such a thing. When she tells him the name of the priest, Father Cutie reveals that the priest is a closeted Gay man who is currently partnered and he is mean to any Gay person who confesses to him. Father Cutie has always welcomed Gay people to the Catholic Church and never believed that they are "intrinsically disordered." Regarding the issue of celibacy, Father Cutie discusses celibacy with the force of a tsunami. He historically tracks down the issue of celibacy dating back to the 12th century when it became compulsory. He states that celibacy is a main ingredient for the current sex abuse scandal in the Catholic Church. Albert Cutie made it an aspiration to take up the cause for Immigration Reform in the United States because his ancestors came from Cuba and he had heard of the executions and suffering under the Castro regime. The Archbishop of Miami immediately issued a proclamation condemning Father Cutie for his "scandal" against the Catholic Church when pictures were revealed in the press with Albert and Ruhama kissing each other on the beach. Father Albert was stripped of his salary, pension, and health benefits. Father Albert was disgusted with this condemnation and stated that priests who molested children were dealt less severely than he. I liked Father Cutie's description of the Catholic Church as being "antiseptic" and wanting to rid itself of germs (priests whom they view to go against their dictates). Father Cutie had plenty of support from his own family for marrying Ruhama and later becoming an ordained Episcopal priest. To be adversarial, there were some enemies who hurt Father Cutie with vicious words. For example, he and his wife attended his niece's first Holy Communion at a Catholic Church in Florida where he grew up. The priest during his homily talked about the evils of this world and explicitly looked at Albert and Ruhama when he scolded those who dropped out of the Catholic Church. Father Cutie revealed in his book that he was really hurt by those words. Father Cutie has written a powerful book that should not fall on deaf ears in the Vatican. "Dilemma" is a book that will ignite sparks in the Catholic Church and rightfully so. "Dilemma" will inspire Catholics who want change in the Catholic Church because the Vatican is certainly not listening.

posted by CasperAZ on January 4, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

19 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

Misleading-remember who wrote it.

This book is like a little teen who got caught going against their parents wishes and uses every excuse to justify their case. Do you blame him? In truth, a priest can legitimately leave the priesthood and be secularized back to what the church calls a "lay" person. ...
This book is like a little teen who got caught going against their parents wishes and uses every excuse to justify their case. Do you blame him? In truth, a priest can legitimately leave the priesthood and be secularized back to what the church calls a "lay" person. There is a process. Then he could have been married legitimately in the church and him and his wife would have been welcome members of the church. Actually, he still could go thru the process and come back into the church with his wife and child. That is why I read this as a man who got caught with his pants down and then wanted the cake and eat it too. He is a cry baby and holding the Church up as his sacrificial escape goat. If you read the book understand who is the child writing it and pointing fingers. Then go search the truth yourself. Try reading The Big Fisherman by Lloyd Douglas? (same author as The Robe) now that might instill some prespective.

posted by catwalk on January 17, 2011

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  • Posted January 10, 2011

    One more Priest that selects what to believe

    Sad. The book tells the tale of a Priest who discusses the confessions of others under the premise of exposing hypocrisy. Perhaps it is Mr. Cutie that thinks he forgives sins because he apparently feels open to discussion of some he has a point of view about. He implies that he has the best insight on biblical teaching and the Pope is out of date, particularly he feels the gay & lesbian lifestyle should not be spoken about in any but a positive light. I know some Priests who would admit to having gay feelings but they chose to suppress those feelings and live a lifestyle accepted for Priests. The Church does not condemn them to hell just because they may still have but not act on those feelings. Mr. Cutie would have you believe that it does. Cutie might do a bit of self inspection before writing a book for money. I personally am confused. He takes a vow with the Church but then he breaks that vow in silence and goes on dates on a public Florida beach with a woman he eventually marries. Apparently he also believes one simply make vows and disposes of them once your life encounters a change. He did not leave the Church before taking to the beach because he did not care what message let's say he would give to a child of a parish member on that Florida beach and what message that child might take from his actions. That is OK in Cutie's mind because life is first and foremost about "you/him" not service to others. Christ said forsake all and follow him. He didn't add until you meet someone, decide to date for awhile and then decide if you want to be a full time member of the role, in this case of disciple. He might look at the bible where it refers to millstones around the neck of people that mislead a child. Mr. Cutie is not focused on Church teaching, he is talking social justice in this book and how the Church must change. Personally, I too am accepting of the idea that Priests be allowed to marry. But we're I the new wife of Mr. Cutie I might keep an open eye on how he keeps this particular vow. Or perhaps, keep an eye on the beaches. Father Cutie's book will make liberal/progressives happy for it gives more opportunity to attack the Catholic Church than to speak of its many wonderful acts, beliefs and teaching. I wonder if Father Cutie really cares that the book could well cause more damage to souls than good. Father Cutie wrote the book to shift the dilemma away from himself and to move it so as to appear it is the Catholic Church that has the dilemma. Any Priest is able to leave and marry. The book gives much opportunity for liberals and progressives to criticize the Church. I wonder if he cares if in the end it causes more harm to souls than help?

    10 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2011

    Truthful but Hurtful.

    As a devout Catholic for most of my adult life and having been very involved with my parish .......most of what he writes is sadly true. There is little if any accountability for our Pastors and Parochial Vicars and diosecesan priests in general have become spoiled and most lack humility their "calling" has become a job.

    But what must be remembered is that the Catholic Church is run by people.... people just like you and me....no better no worse. If we are to follow a person or persons in search of God we will be disappointed each and every time no matter what religion. The Catholic Faith is still the richest in it's sacraments and in my opinion closest to what Jesus spoke about while here on earth. And yes there are wonderful priests that I know and are doing wonderful things in the world!

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2013

    Repitition

    Too much repitition in this book. Could have been written in 100 pages.

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