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Customer Reviews for

The Disappeared

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
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5 Star

(12)

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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted April 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Fantastic!

    Kicking off the Retrieval Artist, this book introduces Miles Flint and a complex world with aliens and the legal consequences of interstellar diplomacy. I found it very engaging, fun to read and can't wait for the next book to come out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 11, 2013

    New (to me) series to enjoy

    The Retrieval Artist series is great science fiction, with complex characters, intriguing ideas, and good science (no fires in space, for example). I am on book 3 now, and thoroughly enjoying this series.

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  • Posted November 3, 2011

    Highly recommended

    I'm an avid SF fan partial to "hard" SF. I really enjoyed the use of ultimate computer networking as well as interplay of an individual trying to do right in a future world. Give it a try, it's fun! Matt in Western PA

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  • Posted September 4, 2011

    Great Sci Fi Mystery

    If you like Sci fi and like detective stories here it is altogether. Kristine Kathryn Rusch does a fabulous job of painting a picture of a future where other life is out there. With other life being out there, new laws follow these new lives. With new laws there are new challenges to break those law. New challenges to catch the law breakers. Take the chance read a realistic portrait of the future.

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  • Posted May 7, 2011

    This is a great series

    We picked up the last book in the series in paperback, and enjoyed it so started buying the books in order. This one is one of the better ones, and the first one (other than The Retrieval Artist which is a short novel).

    Not all of the series out currently out in ebook format, so we still had to go back to paperbacks.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2004

    What is Justice?

    Humans have expanded into space, but dealing with their alien neighbors has taken a lot of negotiation. Alien justice is harsh, but humans agree to abide by their laws and punishments for the sake of trade. The Rev have brutal work camps, the Wygnin take children to pay for the crimes of their parents, and the Ditsy have gruesome vengeance killings. Humans who willingly or unknowingly break an alien law must submit to the sentence or disappear. Miles Flint and his partner Noelle DeRicci are detectives on the Moon; within a few short days, they are drawn into three cases of alien justice ¿ an unusually high percentage. One involves a woman, Ekaterina, who is trying to disappear to avoid the Rev; the two others involve people who have been hiding for years. As DeRicci tries to track down Ekaterina, Flint tries to figure out how to avoid turning a baby over to the Wygnin while working to solve the connection between the three cases. The Disappeared functions fairly well as a detective partner story with DeRicci as the embittered veteran and Flint as the newly promoted rookie. Plenty of tension is provided through checkered pasts, irritable aliens, uncaring bureaucracy, and the occasionally convenient loss of communications. Rusch deals well with the emotional turmoil involved in having to support alien laws that seem immoral and are quite accurately described as inhumane, especially as the detectives get more involved in the cases. The characters are fairly well drawn - they are all basically decent, real people facing difficult situations and haunted by their pasts. I'd like to know more about the aliens ¿ we¿re really just introduced to them in this book. I have to wonder if there are any aliens in Rusch's universe that are even-tempered and reasonable by our terms. This is the first novel in the Retrieval Artist series, and sets up the background and main characters. One of my minor quibbles with The Disappeared is that sometimes it feels like the set-up is more important than the story being told. Also, I found Flint's amazing ability to get secure information out of any computer system he touches to be unrealistic. The Disappeared does succeed in making you think about justice and culture clash ¿ I'll be interested to see where Rusch goes next with these concepts.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    great future galaxy tale

    In the far distant future, Earth exists with other sentient species by obeying galactic law, though this may not be the best in some individual human cases. If Terra or its colonies want to trade with other species, the law must be obeyed. Miles Flint doesn¿t think of these ramifications when he becomes a moon detective. He accepts the job because he sees it as a way of helping people. <P>Then the Wygin come. This alien species want the children of two humans who have committed crimes on their home world, crimes that they never even knew they were committing and were nothing similar to Earth law. Miles must also deal with the case of Ekaterina Maakestad, a woman who did her duty as a defense attorney and is wanted by the Rev because her client then went on to commit other crimes after she got him acquitted on the first charge. Miles, in good conscience, can¿t turn the children and the woman over to the aliens but if he doesn¿t, he is breaking the very laws he has sworn to uphold. <P>In THE DISAPPEARED, there are disappearance agencies that help people wanted by aliens establish new identifies reminiscent of today¿s witness protection program. The results of an unscrupulous agency is what this story line is all about and how one man within the system, tries to do what is right even if it is not legal. Kristine Kathryn Rusch is a talented storyteller who creates a make believe future galaxy that seems very real. <P>Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

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    Posted December 1, 2009

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    Posted March 30, 2011

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    Posted May 8, 2011

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    Posted June 11, 2011

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    Posted April 21, 2012

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    Posted July 31, 2009

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    Posted September 2, 2010

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