Customer Reviews for

Disneywar

Average Rating 4.5
( 32 )
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5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(11)

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2007

    Very Interesting

    This book was great, and really showed the downfall of Michael Eisner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2005

    Insightful!

    Pulitzer prize winner James B. Stewart paints a portrait of Michael Eisner that has more in common with a totalitarian dictator than with most CEOs. Stewart is careful, though, to trace the Walt Disney Company¿s growth and success under Eisner, even though he was really running Disney for the benefit of just a handful of people - including himself. And, just as carefully, Stewart traces the company¿s spiraling internal chaos. The pluses: the author tells an instructive, intricate corporate saga in intriguing detail. Minuses: He is no expert on the film industry and the narrative doesn¿t build much momentum. Frustratingly, although no doubt for sound reportorial reasons, he also mostly refuses to draw conclusions until the short final chapter. We recommend this troubling portrait of corporate excess and misbehavior to all managers and to students of entertainment and media as a lesson on the pitfalls of untamed corporate politics and unbridled CEO power.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2005

    27.5% at Disney thought Eisner did a good job.

    Stewart¿s book is an entertaining history of the personality conflicts (with almost everyone) and dubious management by Michael Eisner. Full of gossip and amazing personal details, the story begins with Eisner¿s takeover of the company and his first ten years of excellent results (or were they Katzenberg¿s results?) all of which appears to end with the death of Frank Wells in a helicopter crash in 1994. With Eisner left alone to manage the company he implemented his cult of the personality style of management. Eisner¿s worse traits took control of the company culture as he refused to share credit, or give credit, bullied managers, fired anyone who was viewed as a successor or contributed anything to results. It¿s almost like he wished certain people to whom he delegated would fail. Over and over again he is caught saying if he only had more time he could turn this or that (ABC) around, but he did not want to undermine his managers. You read this wondering why did it take till 2002 for some on the Disney board to begin to rebel and ask for Eisner's head? But Eisner ran roughshod over the Board. The story of what he did to Andrea Van de Kamp to remove her from the board is just awful. And then the real highlight of the narrative is Eisner¿s buying the Fox Family channel for $5.3 BILLION without any plan or due diligence, only to find out that months later the purchase was worth maybe $4 BILLION less. Eisner is the dark prince of ego and arrogance and some of his management team come off little better as they are more concerned for their own welfare than the companies employees or shareholders. In the end the one thing that struck me as most interesting was that 72.5% of Disney employees voted via their 401K shares to remove Eisner in the shareholder revolt. Eisner had the hearts and minds of only 27.5% of those who worked for him. This all certainly is a major blow to those who would push the myth that business experience is a must in political leaders. If you learn nothing else this book demonstrates the consequences of not doing your homework, and having a leader who does not ask questions or listen to those closer to a given transaction. A leader that has all the answers is no leader. How many other CEOs could learn from Eisner's mistakes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2012

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    Posted June 29, 2009

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    Posted December 22, 2009

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    Posted July 7, 2014

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    Posted December 27, 2011

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    Posted September 1, 2011

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