Customer Reviews for

Do Fish Drink Water?: Puzzling and Improbable Questions and Answers

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

GREATEST BOOK EVER

This book is full of alot of useless information. Its a book that will help a person start conversations with strangers. I recommend this book to everyone.

posted by Anonymous on April 3, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Decent...but not great

This book is represents an interesting endeavor: trying to distill so much trivia into so little a space. Athough it is filled with fun facts (termed 'factoids') and does contain much accurate information, the book also contains numerous errors and incomplete answers t...
This book is represents an interesting endeavor: trying to distill so much trivia into so little a space. Athough it is filled with fun facts (termed 'factoids') and does contain much accurate information, the book also contains numerous errors and incomplete answers to questions. Examples include: *The books declares, incorrectly, that there are no speed limits on the Autobahn (page 244). *Page 126 claims that Isaac Asimov has authored at least one book for every Dewey Decimal cetergory. Considering there are nearly 1,000,000 catergories, this seems unlikely. *Page 153 tells us that 'no one lived to tell what happened' at the battle of Little Big Horn. I suppose this is true if we ignore that fact that Native Americans are people. *page 108 provides only one of the most popular theories about the origin of 'Mind your p's and q's'. We are left wondering...what are some of the other theories. A quick search on the internet yielded 8 different theories, all interesting and plausible. *Page 112, paragraph 3, talks about 'one of the greatest finishes of the decade'. Fine, but what decade are we talking about here? *The book also states that 'An Englishman invented a toilet in 1775...It was another 200 years before another toilet appeared'. Really? I could have sworn there were toilets in the pre-1975 era (page 169). *page 124 tells about L. Frank Baum's infamous 2-drawer file cabinet that led to his naming of 'Oz'. Everywhere else I've checked, however, indicate that there were three drawers in the file cabinet (much more plausible, too, if you know anything about the English language). *Page 187 promises to tell us four methods for saving soap slivers, but then only provides three. *page 179 claims that a star on a Tootsie Pop wrapper can be exchanged for a free Tootsie Pop. This is an urban legend, long-since debunked. *page 73 tells us that Napoleon was, at five foot five inches, an average height for his century. But then pages 255-7 lead us to believe that it is untrue that people were shorter in previous centures, despite the fact that it also notes that five foot nine is now an average height for a man. I also suggest, if you do read this book, try your best to ignore the pointless subtitles that many of the questions are given. It appears as thought they are an attempt at humor, but they simply detract from the information.

posted by Anonymous on January 3, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2006

    Decent...but not great

    This book is represents an interesting endeavor: trying to distill so much trivia into so little a space. Athough it is filled with fun facts (termed 'factoids') and does contain much accurate information, the book also contains numerous errors and incomplete answers to questions. Examples include: *The books declares, incorrectly, that there are no speed limits on the Autobahn (page 244). *Page 126 claims that Isaac Asimov has authored at least one book for every Dewey Decimal cetergory. Considering there are nearly 1,000,000 catergories, this seems unlikely. *Page 153 tells us that 'no one lived to tell what happened' at the battle of Little Big Horn. I suppose this is true if we ignore that fact that Native Americans are people. *page 108 provides only one of the most popular theories about the origin of 'Mind your p's and q's'. We are left wondering...what are some of the other theories. A quick search on the internet yielded 8 different theories, all interesting and plausible. *Page 112, paragraph 3, talks about 'one of the greatest finishes of the decade'. Fine, but what decade are we talking about here? *The book also states that 'An Englishman invented a toilet in 1775...It was another 200 years before another toilet appeared'. Really? I could have sworn there were toilets in the pre-1975 era (page 169). *page 124 tells about L. Frank Baum's infamous 2-drawer file cabinet that led to his naming of 'Oz'. Everywhere else I've checked, however, indicate that there were three drawers in the file cabinet (much more plausible, too, if you know anything about the English language). *Page 187 promises to tell us four methods for saving soap slivers, but then only provides three. *page 179 claims that a star on a Tootsie Pop wrapper can be exchanged for a free Tootsie Pop. This is an urban legend, long-since debunked. *page 73 tells us that Napoleon was, at five foot five inches, an average height for his century. But then pages 255-7 lead us to believe that it is untrue that people were shorter in previous centures, despite the fact that it also notes that five foot nine is now an average height for a man. I also suggest, if you do read this book, try your best to ignore the pointless subtitles that many of the questions are given. It appears as thought they are an attempt at humor, but they simply detract from the information.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2006

    It is not that great

    It doesn't talk about anyone topic for a certain numbers of pages. It sounds boring.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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