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Dolls Behaving Badly

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted April 22, 2013

    "Yesterday, I was so worried about money I stayed home from

    "Yesterday, I was so worried about money I stayed home from work and tried to drown myself in the bathtub. I sank my head under the water and held my breath, but my face popped up in less than a minute. I tried a second time, but by then my heart wasn't really in it, so I got out, brushed the dog hair off the sofa, and plopped down to watch Oprah" ~eARC, 1%

    With that morbidly hilarious scene within the first few pages of Dolls Behaving Badly, I knew I was in for a treat. Set in Anchorage, Alaska, Dolls Behaving Badly is a multi-faceted story of a small group of women, centered around single mom Carla Richards. Carla is nearly broke, struggling to make ends meet for herself and her young son, Jay-Jay. Besides waitressing, she supplements her income by making naughty dolls for an erotic website. She has a love/hate relationship with her ex-husband, Barry, but that doesn't stop them from sleeping together when they both get lonely. She is an artist who let her dreams go by the wayside. And there's a guy...Francisco. He's handsome, intelligent, and interested. But is taking another shot at love worth the work?

    Carla is also the rock for the women in her life. There's Sandee, a co-worker who's husband ditched her without a trace while on vacation in Las Vegas. Stephanie, her wise-beyond-her years babysitter who's home life is a disaster, leading her to move in permanently. A self-absorbed sister, Laurel, who's left her husband after becoming pregnant with another man's child. Rounding out this group of ladies is Carla's deceased Gramma, whose memory is a constant influence from beyond the grave.

    I found Dolls Behaving Badly to be such a thought-provoking and moving story. One moment I would be struck so profoundly by the author's knack for pinpointing the highs-and-lows of womanhood right on the head. The next moment, I would find myself smiling at the Carla's wry, matter-of-fact tone, marking the absurdity of life and love. I found myself reminded of the funny tone in "chick lit" books such as those by Sophie Kinsella or Helen Fielding. I also found myself smiling the bittersweet, knowing smile I often held while watching a television show that focused women, like Desperate Housewives.

    Dolls Behaving Badly is a book that almost every woman I know would identify with. Even if you've never experienced all of the trials Carla has faced, there are pieces to the story that all women can inherently identify with. Dolls Behaving Badly was an honest and funny looks at one woman's life, and I'm so happy to have read it.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 19, 2013

    This book is the best thing since Bridget Jones¿s Diary. Here¿s

    This book is the best thing since Bridget Jones’s Diary.

    Here’s why it’s even better:

    1) It’s set in Alaska
    2) Includes naughty dolls
    3) Recipes for baked goods
    4) Is hilariously and heartbreakingly true to life
    5) Stephanie the babysitter (see review below)

    Dolls Behaving Badly is a story so brutally honest and personal that its diary-style format couldn’t be more fitting.

    What amazed me most was how much I could relate to the main character, Carla Richards, which is funny considering I’m not divorced, in debt, a single mother, painter or waitress. Yet I found myself nodding along with her comments throughout the book. Carla speaks for any woman who’s ever wanted more out of life. I hear you, sister! 

    Best of all, I laughed my head off in many places, which earned several stares as I read inside my car on the ferry.

    Books that can make me laugh out loud earn a special place in my heart for all eternity.

    Now, bring out the babysitter!

    Stephanie is one of my all-time favorite fictional characters. I could share a number of her witticisms, but I think her flier says it all:

    GOT KIDS? HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR WITH THREE YEARS
    EXPERIENCE WILL WATCH, FEED, AND AMUSE YOUR
    KIDS WEEKNIGHTS AND WEEKENDS, UNLESS
    OCCUPIED WITH A TOTALLY AWESOME DATE.

    The moment I read that, I could NOT wait to meet Stephanie. I almost wish I had kids – just so I could hire this larger than life teen! Maybe she’d dog sit?

    The baking recipes scattered throughout the book reflect the mood of the main character with instructions like “eat late at night after a good cry” or “eat the whole damned batch by yourself” or “share with good friends and family. Laugh. Always have seconds.”
    That last one was for Gramma’s Polish Apple Cakes, which I made this morning...and I did have seconds...and thirds.

    Comedy, entertainment, life lessons, and recipes all rolled into one book. Dolls Behaving Badly goes onto my all-time favorite’s list.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 6, 2013

      Carly decides to keep a diary at the suggestion of an Oprah Gi

      Carly decides to keep a diary at the suggestion of an Oprah Giant.   She's confused about her life and trying to get things back on track.  Carly is an artist, a waitress and a doll maker.  The last two help pay the bills.  While dealing with her own problems, Carly is also everyone else's go to woman. If they need advice, a shoulder or help, she's there.  If it seems confusing to you, imagine what Carly's going through.




         A fantastic look at the life of a divorced mother of one.  The issues, the daily stuff she has to deal with and her own fears keep her off balance until the end.  Well written and relateable characters make this an enjoyable read.  Through laughter and tears you'll see Carly fight to straighten out her life.  




         I didn't find any issues.




        I gave this one 5 cheers out of 5 because of the wonderful homey recipes included.    ~Copy of book provided by author in exchange for a fair review~

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 12, 2014

    Ritchie has written a uniquely structured novel that uses a diar

    Ritchie has written a uniquely structured novel that uses a diary format, employing first-person narration, letters, and recipes. The structure adds considerable depth to what would otherwise be an ordinary story of a single mom trying desperately to support herself and her young son in an economically depressed small Alaskan town. Much of the novel reminded me of the TV show, Northern Exposure, except there is no outsider to pass judgment on the quirky, eccentric characters. Instead, the reader immediately feels the normality of the community: the bill collectors demanding payment often do so with dry humor; the crisscrossing of romantic relationships raises few eyebrows; and seeing and talking to ghosts seems a natural result of stress and loneliness.

    Ritchie draws an Alaskan territory that is otherworldly beautiful and yet cruel at the edges. The cold darkness of winter seeped into my bones as I read, yet I wished I could be there as Carla comes across a moose while running. And I wished I could be there for the community as well. You definitely feel the draw of Alaska as a place where a person could be her- or himself, where everyone has a quirk or two and where no one, ultimately, is more normal than anyone else.

    A lot happens in this novel as Carla tries to straighten out her finances as her life threatens to spin off into a melodramatic disaster of soap opera proportions. Her older sister, with whom she had always had an uneasy relationship, suddenly moves into Carla’s trailer, seemingly ignorant of Carla’s need for stability and money. An anthropologist pursues her romantically, her closest friend sets off on her own roller coaster of romance and fear, and a street-smart teenager becomes her son’s babysitter and, by extension, the daughter that Carla often imagined having. Her son Jay-Jay is gifted and has a preternatural wisdom that both his parents depend on. He’s their proof that they did at least one right thing together.

    How Carla manages to earn some extra cash, get noticed as an artist, and weather the resulting publicity moves her story along at a steady pace. It was a good thing I read this book while on vacation because it was hard to put down. I always wanted to read “one more chapter” before turning off the lights.

    This is a rich novel. I could write so much more but I don’t want to give it all away. Read it for yourself.

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  • Posted April 11, 2014

    Great book for discussion

    If you've ever been a girl or woman who behaved badly or made foolish choices, this book is for you. It's a story about the friendships women have; friendships with each other, with their sisters,with their mothers and with their daughters and how those friendships shape who we are and who we become. It's about how those friendships are with us regardless of whether we are in a relationship with a man.
    The book is funny, poignant and at times,raw with sexual perversion. I loved the characters and highly recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2014

    Wonderfully witten

    Carla sheds light on the idea of love and relationships within the context of her life. This book is "artistically vulgar" and yet endearing because it speaks to the person in all of us who are afraid of happiness or love because we feel we aren't good enough. I highly recommend this book and have already had my own freinds read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2013

    Just Ok

    Probably would not recommend.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Pretty good.

    The book was okay. Ended suddenly and lots of gaps left.. I am not sure i would read a second one.










    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    it was ok

    This is ok. It was told in first person not to fond of that..not a book i would reread anytime soon.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 23, 2013

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    Posted July 23, 2013

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    Posted August 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2013

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