Customer Reviews for

Dough: A Memoir

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2008

    Dough in more ways than one!

    My Review of DOUGH by Mort Zachter To all of us who hold dear family stories of our ancestors making their way to America where the ¿streets were paved with gold¿, readers will appreciate this charming and relatable memoir by Mort Zachter. Mort¿s Jewish immigrant grandparents, Max and Lena Wolk, came and opened a bakery in New York¿s Lower East Side in 1926. Their bachelor sons, Harry and Joe, came to work in the bakery even before their parents died, and it became their whole life. Their daughter, Helen, Mort¿s mother, also worked there and that is where Mort grew up. It was common in those times for a family to escape to America and then work hard to eek out a meager living while supporting one another. ¿The Store¿, as the family always called the business, was not actually a bakery but rather a place that sold day-old breads and bakery goods. Mort¿s childhood centered on the small shop in Manhattan, complete with its smells, sounds, customs, and customers. All these things were what made up the fabric of their lives. Mort¿s family lived in a Brooklyn tenement and it was a hard life but all the life he knew. It is almost a classic immigrant story complete with the hard working family, supporting each other, and struggling to provide a decent life for each other. The one difference in this story is that Mort¿s family, unknown to him until he was an adult, was very wealthy! Alternating chapters between Mort¿s childhood and his more recent years as an adult, the story unfolds with the reader becoming involved in Mort¿s struggles to help his family while also trying to better himself and make it through college. This is accomplished only for Mort to find out when he is thirty-six that he is set to inherit millions of dollars that his uncles had somehow hoarded away through success in the stock market and also in bonds. As the reader goes from past to present and back, one slowly finds out more and more oddities about the bachelor uncles and his parents. Zachter thinks about the long and hard hours they all worked, including himself when he had to attend night school to get his degree. He thinks about his poor mother working all that time for no pay while they struggled at home to put food on the table. So many questions, many not answered, and so much to ponder with this new found wealth makes up a good part of this story. With the marvelous background that sets the tone for what this family goes through, only to shockingly bring us to wonder why was it all necessary when there was all this money? The story is nostalgic and often amusing and leads the reader to wonder how Mort Zachter will deal with the new found wealth! How will he feel about his family once he realizes what all this money means, and could have meant for all of them for all those years? Will it change his life or is he set in his ways as perhaps his family was? Will the inherited work ethic be something Mort can give up and change? All these questions will come up as the story progresses and one realizes this is a memorable memoir¿a family story. How a family¿s relationships with each other effect everything in their lives from work, education, religion, love, and of course, the mighty dollar! Submitted by K.H., July, 2008

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2008

    A Fun Look at Walking in Someone Else¿s Shoes

    In this memoir, Morton reflects back on the lives of his family members and the Store, a day old bread and cake bakery in Brooklyn, New York. Morton¿s two uncles, Harry and Joe are truly wonderful and colorful characters, both single and unique, who run the Store along with Morton¿s mother. The Store plays an important roll in the lives of everyone in the neighborhood and holds wonderful memories for Morton. When his Uncle start to age and pass on, some of the long held family secrets get revealed, including the fact that this hard-working immigrant family happens to be filthy rich. This creates many, mixed feeling for Morton, who has struggled all his life financially. From a childhood most would consider poor and bleak to putting himself through college, struggling with the cost of the adoption of his children, and the loss of his job. But as Morton reflects back in time, he realizing that his uncles were not being stingy, but are helping to shape him into the man that he has become. Strongly, even after Morton discovers his newfound riches, he still walks in the shoes of his uncles, not spending anything and saving intensely. Zachter provides a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory classic storyline, highlighted with strong religious and family tradition. He gives his readers glimpses into the past as he digs through the remains of his uncles cluttered apartment. The addition of actual postcards and letters provides truth and quality to the story, as does Morton¿s realization of his own mimicking actions and thoughts. The overall layout of the memoir was wonderful, as was the writing. The jumping between the past and present worked very well. The vast amounts of religions ritual and jargon, were a little difficult to get through, but overall added to the appeal of the story. A fine memoir. Valerie Jones

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2008

    A Fun Look at Walking in Someone Else¿s Shoes

    In this memoir, Morton reflects back on the lives of his family members and the Store, a day old bread and cake bakery in Brooklyn, New York. Morton¿s two uncles, Harry and Joe are truly wonderful and colorful characters, both single and unique, who run the Store along with Morton¿s mother. The Store plays an important roll in the lives of everyone in the neighborhood and holds wonderful memories for Morton. When his Uncles¿ start to age and pass on, some of the long held family secrets get revealed, including the fact that this hard-working immigrant family happens to be filthy rich. This creates many, mixed feeling for Morton, who has struggled all his life financially. From a childhood most would consider poor and bleak to putting himself through college, struggling with the cost of the adoption of his children, and the loss of his job. But as Morton reflects back in time, he realizing that his uncles were not being stingy, but are helping to shape him into the man that he has become. Ironically, even after Morton discovers his newfound riches, he still walks in the shoes of his uncles, not spending anything and saving intensely. Learning the life lessons of the true value of life, love and family, not money works its way through the pages by an excellent narrative. Zachter provides a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory classic storyline, highlighted with strong religious and family tradition. He gives his readers glimpses into the past as he digs through the remains of his uncles cluttered apartment. The addition of actual postcards and letters provides truth and quality to the story, as does Morton¿s realization of his own mimicking actions and thoughts. The overall layout of the memoir was wonderful, as was the writing. The jumping between the past and present worked very well. The vast amounts of religions ritual and jargon, were a little difficult to get through if Judaism is not your own faith, but overall added to the appeal of the story. Dough is a fine memoir. Valerie Jones

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1