Customer Reviews for

The Dragon's Path

Average Rating 4
( 70 )
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(36)

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(11)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

All paths lead to war...

The Dragon's Path is book one in The Dagger and The Coin series. Following the paths of four major characters through out a world-building realm of 13 races in a land once ruled by dragons. Captain Marcus Webster is a veteran captain who is haunted by his past and becom...
The Dragon's Path is book one in The Dagger and The Coin series. Following the paths of four major characters through out a world-building realm of 13 races in a land once ruled by dragons. Captain Marcus Webster is a veteran captain who is haunted by his past and becomes the "father-figure" and protector of rag tag group of miscreants. Cithrin Bel Sarcour is an orphan raised by the Medean Bank and with the banks guidance and tutelage, she is enlisted to smuggle the banks holdings out of town while a war is raging outside it walls. Geder Palliako, the heir of the Viscount of Rivenhalm, is more interested in his books and studies then being a catalyst in the story however, his uncharacteristic actions help set the fates of all those involved. Master Kit is the head of the theatrical troupe who has the gift of truth and more secrets than anyone could imagine. With these four we, the reader, are plunged into a world of magic, tyranny and mayhem. For the first 100 pages or so of the book I found it very hard to stay involved with the story. The different races were confusing at first as were the introductions of each of the main characters. There appeared to be a lack of plot flow as each of these aspects were being introduced. I would have liked a bit more time spent on each of the races or perhaps a glossary included with more information that couldn't be used in the plot. After the initial confusion, the author found his flow and the characters became more substantial and believable in form and character. I love the mystery surrounding Master Kit and his ability to see the truth in all situations it is a skill I would LOVE to have. As the story picked up and you had a clearer picture of where everyone was being headed the book became quite enjoyable and I am looking forward to the next segment of the fate of these folks lives. I wish to learn more about the Spider Queen and her involvement with these people, the history of the dragons and how they lost their rule and whether the truth will unfold as they all walk The Dragon's Path.

posted by Heavensent1 on April 15, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

Price?

I love how 9.99 is crossed out and it says NOW 9.99......wow, what a deal!!!

posted by 7478700 on April 11, 2012

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  • Posted April 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    All paths lead to war...

    The Dragon's Path is book one in The Dagger and The Coin series. Following the paths of four major characters through out a world-building realm of 13 races in a land once ruled by dragons. Captain Marcus Webster is a veteran captain who is haunted by his past and becomes the "father-figure" and protector of rag tag group of miscreants. Cithrin Bel Sarcour is an orphan raised by the Medean Bank and with the banks guidance and tutelage, she is enlisted to smuggle the banks holdings out of town while a war is raging outside it walls. Geder Palliako, the heir of the Viscount of Rivenhalm, is more interested in his books and studies then being a catalyst in the story however, his uncharacteristic actions help set the fates of all those involved. Master Kit is the head of the theatrical troupe who has the gift of truth and more secrets than anyone could imagine. With these four we, the reader, are plunged into a world of magic, tyranny and mayhem. For the first 100 pages or so of the book I found it very hard to stay involved with the story. The different races were confusing at first as were the introductions of each of the main characters. There appeared to be a lack of plot flow as each of these aspects were being introduced. I would have liked a bit more time spent on each of the races or perhaps a glossary included with more information that couldn't be used in the plot. After the initial confusion, the author found his flow and the characters became more substantial and believable in form and character. I love the mystery surrounding Master Kit and his ability to see the truth in all situations it is a skill I would LOVE to have. As the story picked up and you had a clearer picture of where everyone was being headed the book became quite enjoyable and I am looking forward to the next segment of the fate of these folks lives. I wish to learn more about the Spider Queen and her involvement with these people, the history of the dragons and how they lost their rule and whether the truth will unfold as they all walk The Dragon's Path.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is a great thought provoking opening act.

    Though a millennium has passed since the Dragon Civil War left the predominant species extinct, the thirteen humanoid races that served them never learned the lesson that war kills. Captain Marcus Webster understands war kills foot soldiers but not the aristocrats who send others to die in battle. He knows how weather impacts fighting as summer is the time of war and battle is for the young. Marcus plans to lead a caravan before he is drafted as his combat days are over, but his crew is lost being sent to fight.-----------

    While Marcus seeks swords, Cithrin dressed as a boy with his first moustache and a "swinging penis" prepares mentally to escort the Bank's wealth of a nation across the country before the invaders arrive. She struggles to understand caravans unlike the way she comprehends money.----------

    No longer a naïve idealist but instead a jaded pessimist Dawson worries as war comes because his friend Simeon the ruler looks like he aged dramatically over the winter. He no longer appears to be the glorious future for the country; but instead seems like yesterday's failure.-------------

    Aristocratic Geder the street philosopher detests swords. Though he is a terrible soldier who fears his reaction when bodies are sliced and diced, he will do his best to avoid dishonoring his aristocratic family.--------------

    As with the Long Price Quartet, Daniel Abraham effortlessly rotates perspective between the key characters so that readers observe a wide panorama of humanoids following The Dragon's Path to war. Fans will marvel at how Marcus as winter and Dawson as autumn wither; while Cithrin as spring and Geder as summer mature. Thus the first excellent Dagger and Coin military fantasy is a coming of age thriller in which Geder and Cithrin remain frightened optimists unaware they will probably turn into Dawson and Marcus. This is a great thought provoking opening act.-----------

    Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 17, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Well worth the read

    Take this one in slowly. Read it carefully and just let it all sink in. This is one of those kinds of novels where you have to pay attention to what you’re reading, and in the end you’re rewarded with a spectacular book.

    World building is fantastic and well done. The politics involved is extremely well done and I loved that part the most. It is a little difficult to get into at first, but once characters are established, and plot (and sub plots) are understood, then the reading gets more smooth.

    I found some readers weren’t that keen on the characters in this book. I’m the opposite. I loved the character development and the vast amount of detail put into their personalities and their own individual story arcs. I also liked how there’s a small group of characters. It’s not too many where the reader is overwhelmed, and has to go to an appendix at the back of the book to figure out again who is who and under what faction/house they’re under. It’s more centralized on a handful of characters so it’s not confusing and it’s easier to manage.

    I’d have to say, Geder is the one I like to read about the most. You either feel sorry for him, or hate him for his actions. On the other hand, he has the potential to do a lot of good, but also what he might see as the greater good could make him the biggest jerk to have ever been written. I also particularly enjoyed reading about Cithrin’s character development. Although I might not agree with her actions and the outcome of her choices were well deserved, she turned mopey and whiny which didn’t make her any more likable. However, I still enjoyed her story nevertheless. Marcus would be my least favorite because not much really goes on with him except taking care of Cithrin. I wish there should have been more to his story but perhaps that will be revealed more in detail in future books of this series. Also, what I thought was really interesting was, these characters are different from what you see in the majority of fantasy novels (that I have come across) there’s no band of warriors, no group of characters out to banish evil, it’s a banker, a mercenary, and a soldier. Very different and not the norm, but I like it!

    I only wish there was more information about the world, and the other different races. An appendix would have been nice for this kind of information - at least. It is a long book and some might find it a little difficult to get into at first but it’s a rich story, with lots of to take in, and it’s a great fantastic read for fantasy lovers who want something a little different. I’m definitely going to pick up the second book in this series!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    Price?

    I love how 9.99 is crossed out and it says NOW 9.99......wow, what a deal!!!

    2 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Daniel Abraham has kicked off a terrific new epic series with &q

    Daniel Abraham has kicked off a terrific new epic series with "The Dragon's Path". I've come to realize that I love "EPIC". The bigger, the more dramatic, the more flawed characters whose existences connect, orbit and intertwine in more surprising ways...the better.

    The story revolves around a small handful of characters who live in an ancient world populated by a myriad of diverse human-like races. Abraham shifts focus between each of his key characters as he builds a world that's clearly different than our own, but very recognizable in it's sword-and-leather medieval-like inspiration.

    One can't help but see the clear influences of George RR Martin in the story. Abraham has collaborated with "The Game of Thrones" author and pays enjoyable tribute to the modern epic master.

    The flawed main characters are respectively an orphan, a widower, a social outsider, and an influential nobleman who's very focused on keeping the 'natural' social order of societal hierarchy. The characters are developed slowly, and drawn smartly and subtlety. While the action is limited in this first book, Abraham builds a magnificently rich world of intrigue and drama, all driven by the brilliantly realistic and complex core characters.

    I also love the fact that the elements of supernatural fantasy are very limited. There's no real magic, though you get a sense of something "more" running through the threaded experiences of the story. Dragons play a key role in the history and mythology in "Dragon's Path". The dragon lorem, though, is just that: a heavy influence on the history of Abraham's world, but a thing of the past.

    The story is epic in its scope and the magnitude of the plot lines. It's not quite as large and sprawling as "The Game of Thrones", but the themes and atmosphere are similar.

    If you enjoy that kind of depth and heaviness, then I strongly recommend this book. I thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to Abraham's second in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    I finished this 8 months ago and was so dissapointed when I foun

    I finished this 8 months ago and was so dissapointed when I found out the second book in the series wasn't due out until May of 2012. I thought it was great and it left me wanting more. I've read all 5 of George RR Martin's "A Song of Ice & Fire" (wondering how long it will be for #6) and a few others as well to fill my time in anticipation. I periodically go over it in my mind to keep it fresh and ready for May. Very good reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 21, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Can't wait to see where this story goes

    I am a big fan of George RR Martin and also Joe Abercrombie. I picked up this book because it looked like something along those line. I was right. At first, I had a little trouble getting into the story but it didn't take long to become enthralled. The writing was great, the story stayed on topic and the characters really grew with the story.

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  • Posted July 3, 2013

    Fairly bland warring kingdoms series - entertaining/nothing special

    This series is much in the genre of the Belgariad Cycle, although that is a much more classic and engaging series.

    This is pretty much just a run of the mill fantasy series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2013

    Nerogia

    ......want me to advertise?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2013

    Conn

    Ok

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    Flame

    May I join? I take the oath.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    Riptide

    Ok.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    A

    A

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2012

    Fantasy that goes beyond genre norms

    Dragon's Path is a substantial mix of medieval banking with more traditional fantasy story. While it does not have the page-to-page fighting you might see in other titles, it ends up being consistently exciting and interesting to read. This also translated into characters that were developed to a greater extent than would occur in a combat heavy universe.

    Because of the unique qualities of this book, it works as more of a fantasy genre standout instead of being only being a competent example (that many other books seem to fall into).

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  • Posted August 4, 2012

    I loved it!

    I am a huge fan of A Song of Ica and Fire by George R.R. Martin and when I saw that he had revied this book with positive comments, I knew I had to give it a read. I can't wait to read the next part in the series. It is a big, big story, lots of character information...loved it.

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  • Posted June 27, 2012

    Ordered in May 2012 - still awaiting free delivery

    Read the book review in a bookstore from the book and it was great. Still waiting from May 2012 for the free delivery expected in July 2012. Anticipation song goes well with this.......

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2012

    Great Epic Fantasy

    Engaging and fun epic fantasy. If it is good enough for George RR Martin, it is good enough for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2012

    Hey Will

    Whats up.

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 11, 2012

    Wonderful fantasy, great writing - a must have!

    Daniel Abraham has a wonderful writing style that draws the reader into the text. Dragon's Path is an action packed fantasy that keeps your attention to the end.

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  • Posted May 11, 2012

    Good until the ending

    Oh wait, there wasn't an ending. Nothing in the product literature indicated to me that book was one part of a large story. There was one tiny blurb about it being book 1 More importantly, book 2 isn't published yet, so I still can't get to the ending and nothing in product literature indicates how many books are in this series or when I'll get to the ending.

    When I buy a book I expect to find a beginning, middle and an ending inside that book. If not, I expect it clearly indicate something in *bold letters!!!!!* If the author wants to hold some subplots open for a continuing book, great. But when I've plunked my money down, I expect to get a complete story with all the major plot lines closed. To me, that's fair.

    When you buy a car do you expect to only get the part of car? Do you want or expect to only get 1/3 of a haircut, the rest to be finished sometime in the unknown future? So why do we tolerate this crap in books?

    I'd like to give this more stars, but I just can't. I find it too offensive to treat people this way. When I get a complete story, I'll consider giving this more stars, but how can I rate only part of a story? I got part of a book, you get part of a rating. Fix what you did, I'll fix what I did and give you a real review.

    Now I'm off to complain to the publisher.

    0 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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