Customer Reviews for

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

20 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

DRiVE: A must read for parents/teachers/supervisors

Excellent research backs up a great premise, that the work we do should be valuable to us on a level other than the dollar we earn. The internal values which feed our enjoyment and dedication to work are explored. In addition to showing methods for making the way we de...
Excellent research backs up a great premise, that the work we do should be valuable to us on a level other than the dollar we earn. The internal values which feed our enjoyment and dedication to work are explored. In addition to showing methods for making the way we design and develop the workplace or classroom, Mr. Pink gives people at the start or ready to change their worklife the tools to evaluate where they want to go, what they personally value and how to seek more than a paycheck.

I've recommended this book to several managers and execs I work for, and to friends who teach and coach young people.

I appreciate the Add-Ins at the end of the book, and the bibliography which allows for further reading.

posted by Strong_Right_Hand on January 5, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

12 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better.

As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what ...
As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend to think is the best way to reward, incentivize or bribe people to act in beneficial ways. Unfortunately, Pink insists on creating such a tower of babble -- "motivation 3.0," "type-I," "ROE," "if/then contingent rewards," vs. "now/that rewards" -- that we see the cracks and not the solid surface.

Further, why do consultants need to frame everything as either/or (implicit / explicit) when it is in acknowledging the shadings and spectrum that broader engagement comes? This is a book for the choir and not the congregation. So far this year, I've reviewed two other books which have done a much more effective job of covering very similar terrain: Seth Godin's "Lynchpin" and Jeff Jarvis' "What would Google do?"

posted by jcrubicon on May 15, 2010

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  • Posted January 5, 2010

    DRiVE: A must read for parents/teachers/supervisors

    Excellent research backs up a great premise, that the work we do should be valuable to us on a level other than the dollar we earn. The internal values which feed our enjoyment and dedication to work are explored. In addition to showing methods for making the way we design and develop the workplace or classroom, Mr. Pink gives people at the start or ready to change their worklife the tools to evaluate where they want to go, what they personally value and how to seek more than a paycheck.

    I've recommended this book to several managers and execs I work for, and to friends who teach and coach young people.

    I appreciate the Add-Ins at the end of the book, and the bibliography which allows for further reading.

    20 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better.

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend to think is the best way to reward, incentivize or bribe people to act in beneficial ways. Unfortunately, Pink insists on creating such a tower of babble -- "motivation 3.0," "type-I," "ROE," "if/then contingent rewards," vs. "now/that rewards" -- that we see the cracks and not the solid surface.

    Further, why do consultants need to frame everything as either/or (implicit / explicit) when it is in acknowledging the shadings and spectrum that broader engagement comes? This is a book for the choir and not the congregation. So far this year, I've reviewed two other books which have done a much more effective job of covering very similar terrain: Seth Godin's "Lynchpin" and Jeff Jarvis' "What would Google do?"

    12 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2010

    People don't lead people, people lead themselves!

    Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

    My name is David Marquet, from Practicum, Inc and we help our customers structure their organizations to maximize the potential of their people. We call this leadership. When we talk with our clients one of the things we ask them is "do you need your boss to motivate you?" Very few people raise their hands. Thus, it wasn't a surprise to read in Daniel Pink's recent book, Drive, that people do not respond best to external motivation.


    Pink's book is very helpful because it clearly illuminates and explains what we've observed - that external motivation ends up feeling like manipulation and that people will do better in a structure that allows them to find their own intrinsic sources of motivation.


    What are the characteristics of those structures? Pink tells us they are structures that enable individual autonomy, mastery, and purpose. In our practice, we had been emphasizing control, competence, and connection as being important. While control parallels autonomy and mastery parallels autonomy, purpose is an element we had not singled out.


    We think Pink is right, though. Connecting your activity to a higher purpose does give people a reason beyond the immediate that seems necessary to sustain enduring loyalty to the mission. This was particularly true aboard submarines, where crews that understood how their tasks, however difficult, supported a greater goal (defending the Constitution, for example), performed better.


    Drive is a quick read and we recommend it.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2011

    ebook costs more than the hardcover?? Fail!!

    I already have the hard copy of this book, but hate carrying around books and hoped to pick up the ebook version. To my surprise, it costs even more than the hard copy. This is a huge reason why I won't be buying too many ebooks for my NookColor anytime soon. This is a big FAIL on the part of the publishers.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 5, 2010

    Herzberg Redux

    The book covers a very interesting topic and one highly relevant for practicing managers.


    That said however, it is really simply a restatement of what Herzberg and Kohn have been saying for years. You can't buy performance. Pay enough, but then to really motivate employees, you need to tap into higher order needs (see Maslow).

    I think it's a good discussion to have, but there is a role for all types of rewards and recommendations.

    I am afraid that practicing managers will get it in their head that money and rewards aren't important to employees, when they really are. It's just that there are other important things as well.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    What DRIVE might teach us about motivating bankers to more responsible (and profitable) behavior

    There's a lot of hand wringing about what will happen to the entire economy if the financial sector is reined in:
    * Will "under paid" (therefore presumably under qualified) bankers screw up the economy?
    * Will all the good financiers move to hedge funds, leaving our big banks in the hands of a bunch of brain-dead drones willing to work for a mere 25x their average company worker's wage?
    * Is limiting banker compensation the last nail in capitalism's coffin?

    In DRIVE, Mr Pink says Motivation 1.0 centered around survival. Sometimes survival meant stealing a meal or a spouse but eventually the human species figured out that cooperation was a less painful, more humane way to conduct ourselves, and Motivation 2.0 came into being.

    Motivation 2.0 centered around punishment and reward and "it is so deeply embedded in our lives that most of us scarcely recognize that it exists."

    "Despite its greater sophistication and higher aspirations, Motivation 2.0 still wasn't exactly ennobling. It suggested that, in the end, human beings aren't much different from horses -- that the way to get us moving in the right direction is by dangling a crunchier carrot or wielding a sharper stick. But what this operating system lacked in enlightenment, it made up for in effectiveness. It worked well, extremely well. Until it didn't."

    The Seven Deadly Flaws of Carrots and Sticks:
    1. They can extinguish intrinsic motivation
    2. They can diminish performance
    3. They can crush creativity
    4. They can crowd out good behavior
    5. They can encourage cheating, shortcuts, and unethical behavior
    6. They can become addictive
    7. They can foster short-term thinking

    This is not to say that carrots and sticks are always bad. DRIVE has a chapter on circumstances where punishment and rewards work very well, thank you very much. But we're headed full gallop into Motivation 3.0, which recognizes that while people are at times profit maximizers (and therefore extrinsically driven), we are also "purpose maximizers," which means we're motivated intrinsically as well.

    Mr Pink quotes Bruno Frey, an economist at the University of Zurich says "Intrinsic motivation is of great importance for all economic activities. It is inconceivable that people are motivated solely or even mainly by external incentives."

    DRIVE lists several highly successful business people who are driven by intrinsics to achieve and even asks us to ponder whether the intrinsically-motivated Warren Buffett and Oprah Winfrey are any less economically successful than Jeff Skilling and Donald Trump (whom most would agree are Motivation 2.0 poster boys).

    For more on this topic visit: http://tamelarich.com/2010/perspective/banker-motivation/

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2014

    Makes you think

    Stop reading after every main point and think back

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Dan Pink does it again!

    While I was in awe with "A whole new mind," Dan Pink did it again with "Drive." He talks about what truly motivates us. It's a great read for people who want to break out of the extrinsic rewards mold! It also gives people who are in a struggling situation. I recommend Dan Pink's books for all young people who "feel bad" about not having the perfect job or lifestyle. Reading Pink's books will give you hope to truly follow your own desires because in the end, this is most profitable!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A good read, insightful

    I thought the information was very good and helpful. However I thought it was about an hour's worth of information in a five hour effort

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2014

    I started reading this book because I normally enjoy non-fict

    I started reading this book because I normally enjoy non-fiction books. I did enjoy and agree with many of the author's points and learned a lot from what he had to say. However I would not recommend this book unless you are only interested in using it for a reference book. This is because after the author made his point in each chapter I found that all the back up to each point very repetitive and unnecessary. But the information and points are very useful and exceeded all of my expectations of the book for example the author explains why the reward of creating is more important than monetary rewards to us as people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    Jb

    Hey baby fingers her

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Jenny

    Hi jb

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    It's a thinker

    Pink reveals a lot of research about motivation and doe a very good job of simplifying his claim.
    It is a must read for businessmen and leaders. It can show us what the future holds and a little bit about how businesses are beginning to change.
    If you've ever listened to one of Pink's lectures, it almost reads like he is talking to you. A very simple style and minimal jargon.
    Reccomended reading for everyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    Great book!

    This book shows where we find motivation, and he backs it up with scientific reasoning. Will read again!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2012

    Sparkletail

    Hey toms!!!!!!!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2012

    Plauge

    He looked up at Sparktail and sniffed in her heat. He smiled and padded to her wrapping his tail around her.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2012

    I dident even read one word

    I wanna do a game find the odd man out
    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$3$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$s$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$@$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$%$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$&$$$$$$$%$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$#$$$$$$$$$$$$*$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$"$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$-"$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$&$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$5###$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$%$$$$$$$$YXDFFDFDFJFFJDFHFFGHYEHDCEUHNVJVNDBFJFJXJXBCBFIQIDIFKQJEJEIFIWIDIWIWIDIWIDOWOQUWOEIWIDIQIQIQIWUEIWOWOWIIQIFHSCWYCCQIQIQPFDUBBBBBPOOIHOFWUEOOPPPXD DDDDFFVFDQDDXFFCCFWCDSSDQOJOOEOGWQJWWQKWLKGWGDWJGIGIQAOKPKOFOOPPSBOKKDJJJOIIIOIDRYHAOAVSJJJSPDLPOJFBFCBCBSVXVKXBKLBCVCVDHJXHCGFLDLLSKLKKDKDBQOWOQPWOQOQPEOWPWOEPDOSPFPQQSPAPCPQQAPAFQP VFQPQPFQWPQPQQPPVQPQPVPFPCQDPPQPQPQOQOFQJQ HHBDHIUEYWUOQPQP PEPFPDPBODPPVGKSKAJSVZSKCHFKFJCUJFHSUKJUFIFTGHJKZHKOGXKZBSJZIUIIIUULYIUYYXPOXPOUDPXPSOLUZPXPFPFIPIZIJCHGGHFHFFHGGFHFHFHFYFYFJJGMMKKLLLHKKKSMKHMFSRTDTDTEEETDTEETSTTSTDTETTDTVZHDHEJDJDHgshdjhdbHFBBHHHHHHGGGGGHHFRHGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHJJIUGHOFXGDKDDGFLFHFHGZZRXXXGJDDGJXJXJDGXGJDDTDTSJGDDGJDGGDXGJDDDDGDGGZDGDDHJDDDYDTFGDGDGDGJGDJGDUFKDGDGDDDDFYRHSJFYFGVJCHFGGGCFFVYDFHFHFHDHDFHFUDBFBCFCJHFJFBDHFHDDHCHFHCBBFHECRHCHRHRFHH

    0 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2012

    Tribute info continued

    Oh and im 13

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2012

    Brooke

    Tribute from 12
    Good runner and knife dueler

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2012

    Tribute, Jacey

    I am fast, and am really good at knowing what to do in the games. I am from district 2 and am kinda rich. I also am fast at learning so that could help in the training center. Oh I signed up for 7 tesseras

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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