Customer Reviews for

Dubliners

Average Rating 4
( 84 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 83 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2007

    Travel Freely Within Old Dublin

    Dublin at the turn of the nineteenth century is this book's source of inspiration. Joyce here captures a sense of sadness, a sense of folly, and a sense of unsatisfaction in this collection of short stories. Fourteen were intended by Joyce for The Dubliners, and in this Bantom Books Reprint, the lyrically written, but awkwardly structured 'The Dead' has been included (it reads in two seemingly incongruent parts). My notables include 'A Mother', 'A Little Cloud', and 'Counterparts'. 'The Dead' is hailed by the literati as a great piece, and the second half of the story captures the distance that can occur in a marriage, the effects of a perceived affair on a husband and a woman's longing for what could have been if she'd married differently. This collection of stories is compulsory for any James Joyce reader, as it is a sharp contrast in style to Finnegan's Wake or Ulysses. I find the value in it, if one wants to be absolutely immersed in a different time and place, and read some passionately painful, realistic stories. The morals of these stories can be interpreted open-endedly, like most great art, and at times may be too subtle for the modern reader. One drawback to this edition. Shame on Bantam for not presenting the punctuation as Joyce intended. He originally demarcates his changed in dialogue with dashes, rather than standard quotation mark indicators. What is the point of reading the book how the author did not intend it read? Read the book, but choose an edition true to the author's intent.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 16, 2012

    Dubliners remains a fresh view of the people

    Added this to my collection because I remember enjoying it very much as the focus of a literature course at the university in the late 1950's or early 1960s. Joyce captures the essence of every day people doing every day things.
    Modern Library Series has been my source for so many classics.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 14, 2011

    A Must-Read Classic!

    I had to read this book for my AP Literature class, but I ended up buying my own copy to keep notes in..and also because I liked it so much. I loved the message that Joyce was trying to portray with this novel: Dublin (and society as a whole) was stuck in a never-ending circle, paralyzed if you will, of drinking, passionless love and lives, materialism, meaningless faith, etc. I had never read something quite like this before, and I loved the creative grouping of the chapters into a timeline type thing. My favorite chapter was Evelyn. All in all, it was a pretty good read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2007

    The Best Collection of Short Stories

    Dubliners is a wonderful masterpiece that is insightful and cascades with beauty through its words splashed upon the pages. My personal favorite story is 'The Dead' which is Joyce's transition from his more simplistic writing into what will later become his stream of conciousness and deeply imbedded symbolism style of writing that we see in Ulysses. I recommend this to anyone. Some of the short stories are easier to read than others, but there shouldn't be any great trouble in any of them. Each story has its unique beauty and truth about the human race.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2005

    The Dubliners is a revelation into the dark side of human reasoning.

    The Dubliners is a revelation into the dark side of human reasoning. It¿s a smashing book, when you are done with it you understand why people do stupid things, drink excessively or gamble (the reasoning behind it). This book is a benchmark in literary competence that everyone should read. I love this book because it gives the perspective of the lower class of Dublin children skipping school, alcoholics exedra. James Joyce has exceeded the expectations for word choice of the finest writers. It is a book of short, stories each chapter gives a different perspective of the same day in Dublin. James Joyce also wrote the Odyssey which by many standards is the hardest book to understand (in English) and is legendary for its complexity. The Dubliners retains all the richness and word of the Odyssey but everyone can (should) understand.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2005

    A rich book

    This is the second James Joyce book I have read and it goes to reinforce the feeling I had after reading the first that that writer is a great storyteller. In fact, I consider James Joyce's Dubliners as one of the best collection of short stories ever put together. The settings are amazing and the rich and lively characters all combine with the incredible plots to add credence to the stories. Not only are they true to life in fitting with the atmosphere that one finds in Dublin, the stories are also hilarious, subtle, and inspirational and gripping. The pace of the stories is fast and the voices are rich.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2003

    a good place to start

    A GREAT book. If it were a good book it would show this dank, depressive, captivating and surreal world. Instead it emerses you in this world. Joyce's writing is so spontaneous. I despise being gushing but it is Joyce. The man is a genius. (I realise I should refer to him in the past tense but his writing seems to suspened his intellect and reality in time). He never resorts to the writing-by-numbers tecnique of presenting characters with a view to evoking sympathetic sentiments from the reader. Characters aren't pleasant so that you want to be their friend or unsuccesful/destructive/pathetic for the purpose of making the reader feel smug, successful and sensible. I can't recommend this book enough. It's an experience. One which you may find tiring and depressing but which is completely worthwhile. And compared to Finnegans Wake it's a walk in the park! Allows you to experience Joyce's writing without completely perplexing you (speaking from experience!)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    ?

    Is it a series of short stories?

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  • Posted April 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Dublin­ers by James Joyce is a col­lec­tion of short sto­ries pu

    Dublin­ers by James Joyce is a col­lec­tion of short sto­ries pub­lished in 1914. The sto­ries are loosely tied together and are con­sid­ered a clas­sic col­lec­tion in world literature.

    The book con­sists of 15 sep­a­rate sto­ries, the most famous might be The Dead (which was made into a movie by John Hus­ton star­ring his daugh­ter Angel­ica). The sto­ries touch many aspects of Irish life but mostly on how dif­fer­ent classes of peo­ple try to inter­act and the unend­ing quest for upward mobility.

    I read Dublin­ers by James Joyce as an attempt to read out of my com­fort zone as well as to read some well known “must read” books which I some­how (and by “some­how” I mean pur­posely) skipped over. I gen­er­ally don’t read short sto­ries, but I’ve heard so much about Dublin­ers that I decided to try it out.

    The first reac­tion I had to the book was not a pos­i­tive one, it seemed to me that Joyce wrote the book beg­ging for it to be ana­lyzed and dug into ad nau­se­aum. I don’t like those type of books, I like think­ing more deeply into a book and try­ing to read what the author meant, not nec­es­sar­ily what is writ­ten in black and white. How­ever, when an author takes unnec­es­sar­ily steps to make their work pur­posely dif­fi­cult to com­pre­hend, and then only by a few elit­ists, is sim­ply not my cup of tea.

    As I con­tin­ued to read though, I found myself lik­ing the sto­ries more and more. Joyce cer­tainly knows how to cre­ate an atmos­phere and describe objects in order to give the reader a full com­pre­hen­sion of what it’s like being in Dublin.

    Joyce seemed to be able to make a point just by set­ting up his scenes, rather than have his char­ac­ters make them for him. While Joyce does some­times does make explicit points, those only serve to enhance the implicit ones made dur­ing the story instead of stand­ing on their own, which in my opin­ion made the sto­ries very powerful.

    I am not very famil­iar with the times in Ire­land in which the story takes place and I had a feel­ing that I missed a few jokes and obser­va­tions, how­ever I still enjoyed read­ing the sto­ries and the harsh real­ity they present. Dublin­ers is cer­tainly a worth­while read, even if the reader strug­gles through a few para­graphs in order to gain a bet­ter under­stand­ing of the sto­ries and the time they take place in.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    The Dead is easily my favorite short story that I've read. The l

    The Dead is easily my favorite short story that I've read. The last five pages of The Dead are probably my favorite consecutive five pages from any book. There are a few stories I didn't care for but Dubliners is worth it just for The Dead.

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  • Posted October 26, 2012

    highly recommend

    I am using this in my classroom. Great to have a complete set of the stories that we can hear as it would sound in Dublin.

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  • Posted June 28, 2011

    Terrible copy. Many mistakes

    I can overlook quite a few misspellings, but this has numbers in odd places, paragraph breaks in the middle of sentences, odd characters. Very distracting

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  • Posted January 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Simple yet provocative

    This collection of short stories is written in a very straight forward, no frills way and yet evokes Joyce's sense of his own people, their lives in their fullness. It seems very understated and therefore more true. Excellent reading. The stories, characters, and their tragedy really stick with you. Profound.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2008

    An Unusual Read That Leaves the Reader to Come to His Own Conclusions

    In this famous collection of short stories, James Joyce gives us a glimpse into the Ireland of his time. The stories are well-written, and deal with themes concerning human nature. One problem that I found, however, is that he never clearly portrayed some of the character's deeds as either good or bad. I suppose he wanted the reader to make his own decision, but it left me wondering what Joyce's intent was. With all of this said, it is a book that many will enjoy, and one that supplys us with a relatively clear view of the past. ---Ryan Robledo, author of the Aelnathan

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2008

    Dubliners: Joyce's love for the people of Dublin

    James Joyce is one of the greatest authors of the 20th century. The stories in this collection reflect the way that Joyce saw his fellow countrymen. Many of the stories come from Joyce's own experiences and knowing this gives the reader an insight into the author's life as a boy and young man. This collection should be read before reading Joyce's other books as it will give the reader an introduction to his style of writing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2006

    Good book

    This was an awesome book especially if you're interested in this sort of thing. While it is a great read and entertaining, it is also very very heavy and wordy.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2005

    Interesting book, an acquired taste

    Some people say that Joyce is confusing or pointless. Well, the only people who would make that claim are either pompous fake intellectuals or fools. His books just cater to a different crowd. They are not written for people who wish to adorn their lives with 'Classic Literature' to make them feel cultured. 'Dubliners,' like so many other of Joyce's works, is a messy and cerebral novel. People who like having meanings and themes spelled out to them in capital letters will not understand the short stories. He expects that people will become intoxicated with the rhythm and flow of the language and not care about 'continuity' or 'a resolution to the conflict' in the stories. It's an unreasonable expectation for an author to have, but one that provides a deeper reading experience than most other 'intellectual' books. I'm giving it four stars because 'A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man' is better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2005

    Dubliners is a waste of time

    Each story in this collection looks like it comes from a full novel, there is no direction and it becomes very confusing as you are expected to know the background before reading. This causes each story to be long winded, focusing on scenery as much as a full length epic, and it also ends each story before one can come to fully understand what is going on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2001

    Outstanding for Anyone

    One needs to be Irish to grasp the full power of Joyce's book, The Dubliners, just as much as one needs to be Chinese to order chop suey. A tough, but wonderful read, it will educate those of all nationalities.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2001

    A Tough Read

    One has to be Irish to realize exactly which emotions Joyce is attempting to express in his short stories. All bleak, dreary, dank, filled with the quality that makes the Irish the people they are - the nourishment of hopelessness. The characters of Dublin are controlled with a spell that cannot be broken, simply because they love its misery and guilt.

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