Customer Reviews for

Dune: The Battle of Corrin (Legends of Dune Series #3)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

strong Dune entry

The century long war between the human Army of the Jihad and the thinking machine robots of the Synchronized Empire has surprisingly gone very well for the carbon based people. Machine leader Ominius concludes that if current trends continue the humans will prove victo...
The century long war between the human Army of the Jihad and the thinking machine robots of the Synchronized Empire has surprisingly gone very well for the carbon based people. Machine leader Ominius concludes that if current trends continue the humans will prove victorious as they keep recruiting new members with ease. Ominus needs a new weapon of mass destruction to change the tide so he introduces pandemic plagues to eradicate the enemy.--- The virus work extremely well. The machines feel victory is eminent. The humans make a last stand at Corrin, but they are not only reeling from the plague infested deaths, they are divided weakening them further. Jihad leader Varian Atreides claims rival Abulurd Harkonnen acted cowardly; thus both major houses are ready to battle one another at a time when unity is the only hope. Others have split apart seeking solace in enclaves by forming a sorceress based sisterhood and the Freemen of Dune. The future looks bleak for mankind.--- Dune fans will appreciate the final tale in the Legends of Dune trilogy (see THE BUTLERIAN JIHAD and THE MACHINE CRUSADE) that is based on references from Frank Herbert¿s original 1960s novels. The story line is relatively fast-paced (at least for a Dune tale), but also contains the typical mythos-religious blending that is a series trademark). The cast seems two dimensional whether they are human or machine (no Johnny Five is alive amongst this crowd) except perhaps the heated rivalry that adds depth to Varian and Abulurd, but only when they are together in some context. Still readers will enjoy the final act of survival prequels to the Dune dynasty.--- Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on December 9, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

It's sad to see what Dune has become.

Anyone who loved Frank Herbert's original Dune series will likely read this book (and all other B. Herbert/K. Anderson Dune books) and be saddened by what Dune has become. Frank Herbert's series was original and driven by multi layered characters. This book is neithe...
Anyone who loved Frank Herbert's original Dune series will likely read this book (and all other B. Herbert/K. Anderson Dune books) and be saddened by what Dune has become. Frank Herbert's series was original and driven by multi layered characters. This book is neither of those things. Originality is non existent - the story seems to be pieced together with bits from popular science fiction books and movies like The Matrix, Star Wars, and even B-grade horror films like Phantasm (piranha mites - what were they thinking?!). The characters are one dimensional at best and leave no lasting impression on the reader. This book suffers greatly from poor editing (as do most Brian Herbert books). Some points in the story must be mentioned, usually verbatim, well over a dozen times. What makes this even worse is that the same points that are repeated in this book have already been repeated ad nauseum in the first two books of this trilogy as well. I dare anyone to read this book without resorting to skimming through pages. The pacing is also very poor. The main points of interest to most fans of the original Dune series (Bene Gesserits, space folding and melange, the Fremen, etc) are all thrown together in the last 1/4 or so of the book. It would have been a much better read had these points been revealed throughout the book. So what could make this book worse? How about plot points that don't make any sense. There are many but for the interest of posting a short review I will mention the main one that really bothered me - if the humans had technology that could wipe out the gel circuitry of the computers without damaging the surrounding area or killing any humans why did they completely destroy entire planets and kill billions of people with atomic weapons? Also, why did they only entrap the machines on Corrin with the gel circuitry destroying sattelites rather than destroying them? These enormous plot holes make absolutely no sense. While all the B. Herbert and K. Anderson Dune books have been disappointing this one is the worst. Unfortunately for Dune fans they are planning on picking up the story after Chapterhouse Dune. Let's hope they do a better job with that - it wouldn't be hard.

posted by Anonymous on May 1, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2011

    Well worth it!

    No, this is not a Frank Herbert book. Is it worth reading? Yes! The overall effect of this series of books is great because it brings to life the events we got glimpses of in the original books. As for this book I think it pays off in the end.

    Could it have been better? Of course. I think some of the characters could have been fleshed out better. I also think that some of the events in the book could have been delivered with more detail.

    Overall, I say read this book and and the two previous and look forward to the next!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2005

    All loose ends are covered.

    It felt GREAT to finally find out what happened at the Battle of Corrin to make the Harkonnens and Atreides hate each other for so long. The authors are brilliant in their story telling, the book covers all ends and doesn't leave you confused or wanting. This is a MUST read for anyone who has read the Dune series, it will answer all your questions that you had from the previous books.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    strong Dune entry

    The century long war between the human Army of the Jihad and the thinking machine robots of the Synchronized Empire has surprisingly gone very well for the carbon based people. Machine leader Ominius concludes that if current trends continue the humans will prove victorious as they keep recruiting new members with ease. Ominus needs a new weapon of mass destruction to change the tide so he introduces pandemic plagues to eradicate the enemy.--- The virus work extremely well. The machines feel victory is eminent. The humans make a last stand at Corrin, but they are not only reeling from the plague infested deaths, they are divided weakening them further. Jihad leader Varian Atreides claims rival Abulurd Harkonnen acted cowardly; thus both major houses are ready to battle one another at a time when unity is the only hope. Others have split apart seeking solace in enclaves by forming a sorceress based sisterhood and the Freemen of Dune. The future looks bleak for mankind.--- Dune fans will appreciate the final tale in the Legends of Dune trilogy (see THE BUTLERIAN JIHAD and THE MACHINE CRUSADE) that is based on references from Frank Herbert¿s original 1960s novels. The story line is relatively fast-paced (at least for a Dune tale), but also contains the typical mythos-religious blending that is a series trademark). The cast seems two dimensional whether they are human or machine (no Johnny Five is alive amongst this crowd) except perhaps the heated rivalry that adds depth to Varian and Abulurd, but only when they are together in some context. Still readers will enjoy the final act of survival prequels to the Dune dynasty.--- Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 22, 2012

    Fantastic!

    I really enjoyed the original Dune series by Frank Herbert. But this series, written by Brian Hertbert and Kevin Anderson is absolutely the best. It explains everything about how things evolved into the original series. Not completely through with this particular book. But can hardly wait to finish it. I just can't get enough.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    Wonderful

    This trilogy to me marks one of the best stories ive ever read. I never felt a dull moment

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2011

    Great book

    This classic does not disapoint.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Good Read-I Liked It

    Perhaps just as slow moving as 'The Machine Crusade', 'The Battle of Corrin' will climax to conclude the plots that began in 'The Butlerian Jihad' and were established in the Dune Chronicles.
    Put at a serious disadvantage by the retrovirus against humans, the properties of spice are discovered. Through Ishmael and his stepson El'hiim, we witness the destructive divide between those who wish to keep off-worlders away from their sacred and traditional lives and home and those who wish to make their lives easier and more convenient by selling spice offworld. The military's demanding need to use the still unreliable space folding ships is utilized despite the giant lose of men, ships, and money. Norma's determination/obsessive fixation to solve the puzzle of folding space results in her sacrifice by experimenting on herself. The war against the thinking machines comes down to the last remaining Omnius on Corrin, where the Army of Humanity is led by the long lived Vorian Atreides to face the cruelty of the Bridge of Hrethgir and his goal to clear the name of Xavier Harkonnen.
    I recommend the Legends of Dune prequel trilogy, especially to those who've already read Frank Herbert's Dune Chronicles, and/or seen the 1980's movie, and/or the SyFy channel's mini-series. Dune is a space saga for any and all fans of science fiction, readers or not.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2006

    It's sad to see what Dune has become.

    Anyone who loved Frank Herbert's original Dune series will likely read this book (and all other B. Herbert/K. Anderson Dune books) and be saddened by what Dune has become. Frank Herbert's series was original and driven by multi layered characters. This book is neither of those things. Originality is non existent - the story seems to be pieced together with bits from popular science fiction books and movies like The Matrix, Star Wars, and even B-grade horror films like Phantasm (piranha mites - what were they thinking?!). The characters are one dimensional at best and leave no lasting impression on the reader. This book suffers greatly from poor editing (as do most Brian Herbert books). Some points in the story must be mentioned, usually verbatim, well over a dozen times. What makes this even worse is that the same points that are repeated in this book have already been repeated ad nauseum in the first two books of this trilogy as well. I dare anyone to read this book without resorting to skimming through pages. The pacing is also very poor. The main points of interest to most fans of the original Dune series (Bene Gesserits, space folding and melange, the Fremen, etc) are all thrown together in the last 1/4 or so of the book. It would have been a much better read had these points been revealed throughout the book. So what could make this book worse? How about plot points that don't make any sense. There are many but for the interest of posting a short review I will mention the main one that really bothered me - if the humans had technology that could wipe out the gel circuitry of the computers without damaging the surrounding area or killing any humans why did they completely destroy entire planets and kill billions of people with atomic weapons? Also, why did they only entrap the machines on Corrin with the gel circuitry destroying sattelites rather than destroying them? These enormous plot holes make absolutely no sense. While all the B. Herbert and K. Anderson Dune books have been disappointing this one is the worst. Unfortunately for Dune fans they are planning on picking up the story after Chapterhouse Dune. Let's hope they do a better job with that - it wouldn't be hard.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    Utterly worthless

    The fagoty little upstart has struck again! Frank Herbert's universe now joins the ranks of the licensed novel and vanity published genre fiction- bit then again this garbage falls well below even the pitiful standards set by the trash it rests among
    Really we must ask ourselves- what did

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Battle of Corrin, Legends of Dune trilogy, Book 3

    Coming soon.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A good read, A good addition

    The close of a wonderful prequel. The Battle of Corrin sets the stage for the rest of the Dune Novels. If you have wondered why politics, science, tragedy and the universe became what became DUNE, this is the final episode that strengthens the foundations of one of the greatest SF and Literary Epics of the 20th and 21st centuries.

    Recommended without hesitation!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2008

    ha ah ha

    Dune the Battle for Corrin was a good book with a long storyline that sometimes got to be annoying. I enjoyed learning finally why House Atreides hates House Harkonnen but I thought it was for a poor reason. Overall the rest of the book I enjoyed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2006

    Boring

    The novel is inflated in length, and lacks twists or turns: entirely predictable. The whole series deteriorates from the first book. The 'House' series was much better. Let's hope that when he wraps up his father's work it is much better than this.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2004

    A wonderful finish to a great series

    When it finally ends you will wish it hadnt. Growing a bond with the world of Dune and its many distinct and individual characters over the last 11 books has engrossed me so much that I lost track of the world around me. I waited for 4 years to finally reach the end and would gladly wait longer if I could experince the Dune world further. It wonderfully explains how the concepts of the Dune reality were born and is a must read for all who enjoy learning about the roots of the greatest science fiction series of all time!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2004

    Too Long.

    This last part of the series is just too long. I rated the 3 stars for the series, but this book was very disappointing when compared to the first two. Anyway, it is a good sci-fi story. However, there are too many characters. Moreover, the authors make it sound that taking over a planet is like taking over a city. Plus, 100's of billions dead humans, but jihad is declared because of 1 dead baby? I think the authors found Frank Herberts noted and wanted to cash in on them. Well, overall, it is okay, but !!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2004

    Bringing it all together! Awesome Job!

    Three cheers for the authors. I have a sense of longing for more! Guys, please don't stop writing, you have a fan for life. Bene Jesuit, Harrkonnens, The future family of the hawk, Norma, Selim Wormrider and the rest. A must read for all Dune fans. Can I get some more?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2004

    SCI FI LISTENING AT ITS BEST

    Dune fans can relax and rejoice - Dune's back with The Battle of Corrin and Scott Brick's performing it. Doesn't get better than that! Brick's deep, well modulated voice can both lull and electrify. His timing is impeccable in this reading of the much anticipated finale to Dune: The Machine Crusade. If you're not familiar with the previous works, I'd like to suggest that you read or listen before enjoying this fantastic sci fi finish. However, on the chance that you're familiar with the earlier tales, it is now a half century later. A horrendous galactic war has been waged between humans and robots (to put it simply). Just when it looks like the humans might win this battle after all, the evil Omnius releases a deadly plague which literally wipes out entire planets and, of course, their people. One final deadly confrontation remains: Battle of Corrin. Listen to sci fi at its best. - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2004

    Absolutely Magnificent!!

    ...If you should read at least 1 Science Fiction Masterpiece this Millenia....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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