Customer Reviews for

Dzur (Vlad Taltos Series #10)

Average Rating 5
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(21)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted May 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    One Step Ahead

    This is once again a fabulous addition to the Vlad Taltos series. I rather enjoyed eating with Vlad at Valabar and Sons. I wonder if they'll open one up in LA. Brust certainly has a way of putting food to pen then pen to paper. But enough of that.

    Though Vlad has been on the run for years from the Right-Hand of the Jhereg, he finds that he must face them once again. His journey begins at Valabar's, Vlads favorite restaurant. Sethra Lavode is concerned about Vlad's safety so she sends a Dzurlord to watch over him. Here is where we also finaly get to meet Mario Greymist, the most feared assassin in the Jhereg, who agrees to help him. Cawti, his wife, or rather ex-wife, is in desperate trouble and reluctantly agrees to accept Vlads help. The Left-Hand of the Jhereg, a cabal of sorceress women, has deviously taken over South Adrilanka and upsetting the lives of the Easterners. The only way to stop the sorceress Left-Hand, he must confront the corrupt Right-Hand.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2006

    Steven Brust does it again!

    Dzur was a great book. Vlad has just been teleported onto the doorstep of Valabar's, the infamous restaurant, when a visitor appears. It seems that Sethra Lavode has asked him to watch over Vlad, and so the novel progresses. This book was a great read in the way that it keeps the reader going, and I for one was very reluctant to even pause for food. The Lord Taltos has been keen on protecting Cawti, his ex-wife, and this time she is really in a knot. He struggles to win over the support of the Left Hand of the Jhereg, and it is surprisingly more than he bargained for. Unlike most of the other books in this series, Vlad uses more time in actually planning out his scheme (as in pages), rather than in performing it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A fast-paced tale

    As he sits in a restaurant in Adrilankha preparing to confront the House of the Left Hand of the Jhereg, Vlad Taltos thinks back to when everything changed. He was an assassin working for Neilar chasing after one of his employees who stole money from him as Vlad allows no one to cheat him and live to tell it. He followed his mark to Castle Black, the floating home of Morollan the dangerous Dragaeran lord.------------- At Castle Black, Vlad meets its owner and Lady Sethra the vampiress host of Dzur Castle. After a near deadly incident between them, Morollan and Sethra offer Vlad work to obtain a staff that contains the ensnared soul of Dragaeran¿s cousin Aliera. He succeeds barely as he is out of his element. However, Sethra insists though he did an admirable job, the work is not done. She demands that Vlad journey to the terrifying Paths of the Dead to beg the gods to restore Aliera to life.---------------- Though not as powerful as TECKLA, Vlad¿s fourth appearance is a fast-paced tale that takes the reader back to Taltos¿s salad days. The prime story line focuses on Vlad's first encounters with Morollan, Sethra, and Aliera (though she initially is a bit wooden), etc. However that prime plot is enhanced by glimpses of the assassin¿s childhood, which are fun to read, but feel like cul de sacs off the main road. Still sort of a biographical fiction, DZUR is a fine entry that Steven Brust¿s fans will fully appreciate for its light into what made Taltos what he is.------------ Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2