Customer Reviews for

Earth

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
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(19)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2010

    One of my few regular re-reads

    I first read this novel when it was first published twenty years or so ago. Set in a near future, it made a number of predictions and projections and was a great, riveting read. Since then, many of those forecasts have made manifest and if I were a bit more superstitious I'd suspect Mr. Brin of a precognitive ability.

    Read this book and then think about what events and concepts are now 'in the wild' and how many more are likely and possible. I'm not going to post a summary as I can't do it justice - just read it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Earth by David Brin Imagine a world in 2038 where the populatio

    Earth by David Brin

    Imagine a world in 2038 where the population is 10 billion people. Pollution runs rampant, the only way to survive is by recycling. Climate change is not only real, but it has affected one third of the world: Netherlands, Louisiana, India, China are among the spots that have disappeared due to the oceans' rising waters. The ozone layer has eroded to the point where you must wear goggles or risk blindness, wear sunscreen, or risk skin cancer. The species habitat have eroded to the point where it's necessary to create artificial ecosystems to preserve them - sort of Noah's ark, where you are trying to preserve the DNA for when conditions change, if ever....Water is scarce, and most of it comes from desalinization of the ocean's water.

    There are cults to Gaia, or mother earth, where the purist forms of the cult have gone blind and have skin cancer because they refuse any artificial means of sustenance. The Pope has issued an official proclamation so that it's OK for Catholics to worship Gaia.

    In the middle of this, a prominent physicist, Alex Lustig, creates a singularity - a man made black hole - Alpha. Accidentally Alpha is released into the Earth's core. Alpha turns out to be unstable and disappears by itself. While searching for Alpha, Lustig and his associates stumble across a much more dangerous singularity already present at the center of the Earth - Beta. Beta, is exponentially eating up all the matter at the earth's core. Unless Lustig and his associates can control Beta, Earth will be swallowed by this dangerous black hole.

    Lustig manages to create gravity amplification by simulated emissions of gravity, or Graser. Helped by his mentor, Stan Goldman, and a Kiwi mufti-billionaire, George Hutton, the team establish four bases: Easter Island, New Zealand, Greenland, and South Africa, from which they emit this Graser pulses to push Beta out of the Earth's core and make it lose its mass. Unfortunately every time the Grasers are made, there are consequences: earthquakes, tsunamis...Lustig also discovers that Beta was sent over 100 years prior by aliens.

    Because of this, Colonel Glen Spivey from the US Aerospace Force is chasing the team. Spivey would like to have Beta as a weapon against future extraterrestrial invasions. However, Gaia cult and famous hacker, Daisy McClennon, is also chasing the team. She wants to use Beta to destroy 80% of Earth's population to restore order to the planet.

    As they are discovered, Lustig must fight both the World armed forces and the Gaia hacker to prevent a catastrophe. They are saved by Pedro Manella, a journalist, who we discover later in the book is an alien himself.

    This is a fascinating read. I think it's a must for any Sci-Fi enthusiast. Narrated from the third person point of view - and from excerpts from the Internet, it's a wonderful read. I became so obsessed wit the book that it took me over a week to read 601 pages. I just wanted to study and understand each word that was said, because it all seemed to be so plausible....

    Written in 1989, the book makes predictions for the year 2038 - or fifty years in the future. Half century projections are among the most difficult to predict - five decades is just a short enough a span to require a sense of familiarity, and yet far enough away to demand surprises, as well. The writer has to make it believable to the point where someone who will survive the five decades finds the conditions - if not commonplace - then at least normal.

    Even though Earth correctly predicts the Internet and the web, the novel is not a prediction. Earth is perhaps one of the possible tomorrows - one that will strike some on the left as too optimistic, while some on the right might say it's too gloomy.

    Make some time in your life to read this wonderful work of art....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 10, 2010

    Brin's Earth

    With appropriate homage to John Brunner, this is a fully realized extrapolation of a not too future Earth. The delineation of the ideas is very good and the development from what is 'now' to his vision is quite clear, and quite plausible. Brin's writing can vary from the acceptable to the brilliant (his Uplift novels run this gamut)and this one is very good and consistent throughout. While Brin's characters seem to be fractal (less than full dimensionality)they are likeable and memorable. Several always seem to be a bit unreal yet they do not impede the story or diminish it. This is a very engaging book and, like its obvious influence Stand on Zanzibar, is a book of many characters and a book of many ideas; both being central to the story. I personally found the ideas more appealing than the characters. Overall, a really good read and i think a rather significant contribution to the field of Sci-Fi because of the full realization of an envisioned future consistently extrapolated from the present.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2013

    Jaysoar

    Good

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2012

    Ice Dorm

    -Ravrn

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2012

    Silversteel

    (But whats the diferance between a "con or a bot"?)

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    TO ANY DECEPTICONS LEFT...m

    Next result.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2012

    Silentecho

    I dont know. Okay ill be back at base.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    Nice

    Interesting book. Good for bookworms like myself! XD

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  • Posted April 22, 2011

    Very good, real SCIENCE fiction

    Great story, though it does get a little complicated and their are a lot of characters to keep track of, but it all comes together at the end. The science part is a little heavy but it fits the story well. Don't let the challenge stop you. Though it was written in 1990 (I think), some of his assumptions of the future have already come true. Lets hope they don't all!

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  • Posted February 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Brin at his best

    I read this years ago. One of the main characters states that if is difficult to predict the future. Yet Brins vision from 1990 is easily recognized in our lives today.
    Considering the widespread use of the internet and portable devices in this story is cool to be able to read it on the nook.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2009

    One of my favorites!

    It's long and not the easiest read. But it is captivating, thought-provoking, perhaps a bit prophetic. If you love Asimov, you will love this! I had to buy another copy, since my son won't give mine back!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
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