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Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy Eating

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2005

    Science comes to the rescue.

    After years of following the dietary habits of nurses, physicians, and others in long-term cohort studies, this investigator comes to some surprising conclusions regarding the benefits and dangers of various dietary regimens. If you are dieting, thinking about embarking on a diet, taking supplements, think you do not need to loose weight with a Body Mass Index below 25, or are simply confused about the rash of claims of health benefits for various dietary practices-you need to read this book. This is not a fad diet book. While the jury is still out on many common dietary proscriptions, there is good evidence to support the many recommendations Willett makes-and not everyone is going to be happy with his conclusions. Some background science is very clearly explained, such as types of fats (HDL/LDL/Transfats etc.).

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    This book is a must!

    I love this book. I actually have two copies. The previous book and this new updated version. I recomend this book to everyone struggling with weight or bad blood work results. This book puts your health and foods effects on it in simple easy to understand terms. I like that it is an unbiased book and is a collection of multiple studies results and not just one. Thank you for a wonderful book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2005

    One of the best nutrition books out there!

    I read a lot about nutrition, diet, and health. It's an obsession really. I even read about diets I completely disagree with. Having said that, this is the best book in this area that I have come across. There is no 'selling' of a diet. It's clear, concise research that outlines a very well-rounded nutrition plan that isn't difficult to follow.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2012

    Heheheh

    Im SPARTA!!!!! Lol write a review back to me cuz im epical.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2012

    A must to read book

    You'll be surprised of how much you can understand about healthy eating by reading it carefully

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  • Posted July 30, 2011

    Really enjoyed this book.

    Alot of good info on basic nutrition in easy to read style. It is one I go back to for reference frequently.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2004

    Read, Think, and Be Healthy

    Finally, a book that uses actual facts to provide us the best information available for a healthy diet. This book isn't a list of anecdotes about someone's neighbor's cousin losing 50 lbs. by eating bacon and eggs. The findings in this book are backed by large, long-term studies. Find out about the carbs you need and the fats you should add. Read this book and refer to it afterwards as you incorporate the findings into your diet.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2004

    Awesome book!

    This book was amazing! It breaks down the reasoning behind the good carb/bad carb phenomenon. He backs up all of the information with hard scientific data, and makes it easy for a normal person to understand. Being a gym owner, it makes it easier for me to explain healthy eating to my members when I understand the science. If you want to find out WHAT to eat, this is the book for you. Dr. Willett actually explains the effects that foods have on your body. This book is a must-read for anyone who is dieting!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2003

    Antidote to fad diet trend

    This book is all based on HARD SCIENCE, not fads, conjecture, speculation, and wishful thinking. It explodes a lot of myths, for example, that coffee is bad for you. It also explodes the myth of the 'Atkins Diet' as being 'proven' to help people lose weight in a safe manner. If you buy one book on eating, diet and health, this should be it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2002

    Offers dietary wisdom and sound advice

    This book is well researched and easy to understand, with sensible and practical guidelines to help readers make correct dietary decisions. Dr. Willett stresses that food that is good for you need not be boring or tasteless, nor does eating right have to be synonymous with self-deprivation. Although he cites the Mediterranean diet as a prime example of healthy eating, he points out that other traditional diets contain beneficial elements that are worth incorporating into one's eating habits. He has included some recipes, but I have found that the concepts embodied in his book can be very effectively utilized in conjunction with any cookbook that contains healthful and appealing recipes, a notion compatible with his 'flexible eating strategy.' One volume I particularly recommend is Sonia Uvezian's 'Recipes and Remembrances from an Eastern Mediterranean Kitchen,' which provides cooks with hundreds of inspired recipes for dishes rich in flavor and nutrition as well as many innovative ideas that can be used in one's everyday cooking to make it more healthful and exciting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2002

    Physician recommended!

    As a physician, I think I have the authority to let people know that we get all of about three hours of total training in nutrition in medical school. Our year of biochemistry is spent learning garbage that never gets connected to the 'real world' stuff because we're too busy learning the specific sequence of eicosanoid production. Anyway, I bought this book because I wanted to be sure I was telling my patients the right stuff, and because I wanted to learn more about my own diet. This book is fabulous in a lot of aspects, but the aspect that I like the most is that Dr. Willett provides the evidence behind his recommendations and suggestions. There are a lot of crazy diets out there..and he explains why things like the Atkins diet are useless for losing weight over the long haul without getting overburdened in technical jargon. I'm an FP doc, so I like to keep things simple for myself and for patients. The only thing I wish this book contained was a section on calories. He covers fats, carbohydrates, and proteins wonderfully, and there is a section at the end that gives you tips on what to look for out in the food stores and restaurants (and what to avoid!).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2001

    The Latest Research, Good Explanations, and Easy to Use

    Review Summary: You would have a hard time finding someone in a better position to write this book. Dr. Willett is chairman of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, a professor at Harvard Medical School, and he heads some of the most important long-term studies of how nutrition affects health. In this up-to-date book, you will learn what the latest research shows about how eating, alcohol use, exercise and not smoking can help you avoid some diseases and birth defects. The book also explains how to read the latest health headlines and interpret the studies they are based on in the future. The lessons are summarized into a Healthy Eating Pyramid that you will find easy to understand, apply, and remember. The book contains a lot of helpful information about how to shop for more nutritious and healthful foods, and easy-to-follow recipes. I was particularly impressed with the summaries of the data on how weight and eating relate to various diseases. The book's only obvious flaw is that it does not attempt to refine the overall research into subsegment groups like those with different blood types, different genetic tendencies, age levels, and so forth. Review: Like Sugar Busters! this book takes a serious look at overcoming the tendency for having too many fast-absorbed carbohydrates (whether as baked potatoes or as a soft drink) overload your blood with sugars and depress your metabolism. Unlike the 'avoid fat at any cost' diets, this one says to avoid bad fats (especially trans fat and saturated fats) and to use helpful fats (like unsaturated fats that are liquid at room temperature). You are also encouraged to seek out nuts as a source of vegetable protein. There is also a good discussion of the healthiest ways to acquire your protein. The beef v. chicken v. fish discussion is especially helpful. He is skeptical about the need for much in the way of dairy products (I was shocked to realize how much glycemic loading, creating sugar in your blood, is caused by skim milk), but favors vitamin supplements as inexpensive insurance. He shows that calcium supplements may not do as much as you think to avoid fractures. Exercise and not smoking are encouraged. Raw foods and ones that are slow to digest (whole wheat, for example) are encouraged among the fruit and vegatables, in particular. The pyramid is contrasted to the one that the USDA adopted in 1992, which seems to be almost totally wrong. Apparently, it was developed based on a very limited research base. Since then, much has been learned. I enjoyed reading about all of the long-term studies being done now to understand the connections among eating, lifestyle, and health. The next 10 years should radically revise the lessons summarized here, as Dr. Willett is quick to point out. The conclusions in this book, for example, are based on individual studies of eating, drinking, exercise and health rather than the long-term studies that he supervises and follows. So even those studies may show new things. In one part of the book, he discusses the pros and cons of some of the popular diets. Some simply have not been tested for health effects, and he is candid in sharing what is not known as well as what is. This book will be especially valuable to those who like to get their information from highly credible sources, especially from within the medical community. I think I'll give a copy to my physician, who has been advising me to reduce fats in the wrong way! Although I don't consider myself very helpful in shopping for or preparing food, I learned a lot from the book about how our family can acquire better building blocks for a healthier diet. After you finish reading this book, think about where else in your life you may be following outdated information. How can you check? A good example is probably related to what you think it costs parents for children to go to graduate school and get a Ph.D. In many schools, all the costs are subsid

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    Posted January 8, 2014

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    Posted April 27, 2013

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    Posted October 2, 2010

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    Posted August 2, 2011

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    Posted October 23, 2013

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    Posted March 4, 2009

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    Posted October 21, 2009

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    Posted November 13, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
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