Customer Reviews for

Eaters of the Dead

Average Rating 4
( 103 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(46)

4 Star

(35)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Beowulf for modern audiences

It would seem the other reviewers failed to read the author's notes. Ibn Fadlan did write an account of his trip to Russia to see Vikings in A.D. 921 but Michael Crichton (on a dare!) fused that into a fictional retelling of Beowulf to make it exciting and accessible fo...
It would seem the other reviewers failed to read the author's notes. Ibn Fadlan did write an account of his trip to Russia to see Vikings in A.D. 921 but Michael Crichton (on a dare!) fused that into a fictional retelling of Beowulf to make it exciting and accessible for modern readers. The fictional, pedantic manuscript we read is his artistic device. The majority of the book is not an ancient manuscript but a clever novel masquerading as an ancient manuscript. But all in all, I loved the book and the movie!

posted by Anonymous on September 28, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Why Rehash Beowulf?

I was looking forward to reading a history, made into a story, that would cast a new perspective on an ancient race. Instead I was stuck reading a rehashed version of Beowulf. Very disappointed

posted by MsSea on November 17, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted July 20, 2011

    Better than the movie

    I recently read the book "Eaters of the Dead". The book is the predecessor to the movie The 13th Warrior, and after the movie was released the book was actually renamed "The 13th Warrior."

    This book is an interesting view of the life and journeys of a man who was born and raised in the Arab culture and then was thrown into the culture of the Northmen. The turning point of the book comes when the main character, Ibn Fadlan, is called to go to battle with these Northmen who he barely knows and hardly understands. He is constantly amazed by the lack of fear and love for battle of these men, especially one who stands out as the groups leader known as Buliwyf. Buliwyf leads their group of men by example and even at one time says, "I have no fear of anything, even the callow fiend that creeps at night to murder men in their sleep." This fearlessness helps the group of men as they fight an unknown enemy that attacks at knight and in the mists when they cannot be seen, and feeds on the flesh of the dead.

    Overall the book is very captivating and well written. It has parts that are slower to read, but it seems like these parts are always followed by chapters that fly by without you realizing you've even turned a page. The book was a fun read and a quick one too. I would suggest it to anyone who has seen the movie and enjoyed it. The parts that were quickly touched on in the movie are given more attention and detail in the book. One of my favorite things about the book was the parts that are lost in the picture of the movie, such as the smells or the building emotions are vividly described in the book to the point that I personally had to take breaks because my senses would become overwhelmed.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 11, 2010

    A enjoyable book by a great author

    This is a pretty good book, but not for everyone. It is translated from a manuscript found by Micheal Crichton. It accounts the travels of a muslim as he spends time and travels with vikings. I recommend this book to fans of old tales and fans of Micheal Crichton.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 4, 2010

    Eaters of the Dead

    Eaters of the Dead is a story about an Arab messenger who is sent on a mission by the Caliph of Baghdad. On his journey, he comes across a group of Viking warriors, and unwillingly joins their fight against the Eaters of the Dead. The Arab is now made a part of their army, and sent out with them on a journey to protect other clans in the barbaric North. Several fights ensue, and most of the thirteen warriors that were brought on the journey are killed. The conclusion of the story will have you on the edge of your seat wondering what will happen next. The book shows many of the differences in cultures back in the earlier years of history. Something that the Vikings believe in will totally go against what the Arab messenger will believe in. Often times, the Vikings will make fun of the Arab for not being like them, and get a good joke out of how he has only one god of believe in. I really liked how all the characters were introduced, and how in went into more depth about the different customs that the different cultures. I didn't like how the book seemed to confuse you with all the different characters introduced at one time. I found it difficult to keep track of what was going on or who said what. I think that someone should read this book because it has an exciting story, and can keep you occupied for a few days. If anyone has seen or read Beowulf, they will be right at home with the book. The story is a different version of the poem. Throughout the book, numbers can be found after some words. The numbers lead you to a separate part of the book where everything is explained in more detail. If you are finding something confusing, just look at the bottom of the page, and the words are translated into a more modern way of speaking it. Michael Crichton is an awesome author, and he translated this story into a more understandable way of think about it. Overall, I think that Eaters of the Dead is a great story that most people will be able to sit down and enjoy for a couple hours of the day.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 26, 2009

    Eaters of the Dead_wow what a good book!

    Eaters of the Dead is based on a journal/ script of the ambassador of the king of the great city of peace (Baghdad). The story takes place in the Anglo-Saxon era, with many references to animal of modern times to be monster of the past. The main character/ protagonist is the Arab Ibn Fadlan, an ambitious man in him late thirties. This story has a lot of dialogue, and also has much of action, violence, and gore.<BR/><BR/> Ibn Fadlan leaves the city of peace with a mission to make contact with the northerners and to inscribe the main events of his trip. One of the great descriptions of Ibn Fadlan is ¿Then, with a curdling scream to wake the dead, Buliwyf leapt up, and in his arms he swung the giant sword Runding, which sang like a sizzling flame as it cut the air. And his warriors leapt up with him, and all joined the battle. The shouts of the men mingled with the pig-grunts and the odors of the black mist, and there was terror and confusion and great wracking and rending of the Hurot Hall.¿ This was at the battle at King Rothar¿s territory against the dreaded dark mist and their fearless horsemen. This a awesome story for anyone who likes history and loves war.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2006

    Eaters of the Dead was great!

    An Arab official has just been given the worst assignment of his entire career. He must venture with Vikings into their world and out of his. On his journey he will be forced to face his fears, battle horrible creatures, and just try to stay alive. One of his fears he must face is the barbaric ways in which the Vikings live, from their poor hygiene to their heathen ways of life. During the story the Arab and Vikings face horrific creatures said to be ferocious man like beasts who eat the bodies of the men they kill. The Vikings and the Arab find themselves surrounded by these creatures and must fight to save their lives. I found this book to be well written. It has a great plot, suspense to keep you on your toes, and it even teaches us about the history and lives of the Vikings. This book is written for those strong of heart, those who can stomach the many graphic battles and gore of the battlefield. The book holds your attention and makes you want to read the next page to know what happens. All-in-all I recommend this book to anyone interested in Viking folklore or to anyone who¿s just looking for a good action adventure story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2003

    Troy 15 year old, very good

    Very good book but it seems to go very fast, before you no it, it's over. The begining is kinda hard to understand but after that its great!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2002

    I really liked it alot.

    This was definitly one of Crichton's better book's. However, I only gave this four stars, because I had heard alot about this book, and had been wanting to read it for a long time, but when I finally got it, I realized that I had gotten a different published version of the book. I thouhgt that I was getting a really good action book by Crichton, It was not what I had expected, but I think It Is still a masterpiece of Crichton.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2002

    A BOOK TO SET DOWN TO

    I thought it was a good book. I think you will be impressed by it. He wonderfully describes the beliefs and situations of Ahemd Ibn Fadlan. You'll remember it better than Congo.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2001

    Masterful storytelling - a must read

    First half of book - I find Michael Crichton¿s The 13th Warrior to be an informative and entertaining book. There are several features that make the book enjoyable. The first feature is the introduction. The introduction provides us with valuable information about the history of the story. We are provided with a brief listing of its translations as well as background information about the original author, Ibn Fadlan, and those whom he wrote about, the Northmen a.k.a. the Vikings. The second helpful feature is Crichton¿s use of footnotes. The footnotes help the reader to understand problematic vocabulary and also provide historical context. The third feature that strengthens the book is Crichton¿s careful editing of the Fraus-Dolus translation. Crichton tells us that he removed unnecessary or rambling lines from the text, and adapted the sentence structure to that of modern English. Such editing makes the story more easily understood and enjoyed. The final feature, which I think adds the most to the story, is the incredible storytelling of Ibn Fadlan. Fadlan does a concise yet complete job of portraying nearly every aspect of daily life in all of the cultures that he encounters. In addition, he compares and contrasts each culture to his own, in an effort to learn and appreciate as much as possible about those he interacts with. Fadlan describes people, places, and events in an unbiased, serious, and detailed tone which allows the reader to form his own opinion about the story. The introduction, the footnotes, Crichton¿s editing, and Fadlan¿s masterful storytelling make The 13th Warrior informative and engaging. Second half of book - I enjoyed the second half of The 13th Warrior. In this part of the book we learn more about the Northmen culture through Ibn Fadlan¿s discussions with his translator Herger. These discussions are particularly informative because Ibn compares his own culture with the Northmen culture, so the reader is able to get a real sense of exactly how Ibn felt. Ibn does an excellent job of dissecting the Northmen¿s way of life as he sees it. He puts the reader in the shoes of the Northmen as well as himself in various stages of the story so we view certain situations from several points of view. The one aspect of this book that I enjoy and appreciate the most is Ibn¿s relentless pursuit of unbiased and accurate reporting. Throughout the story he reminds the reader that he viewed events first hand (i.e. ¿I saw with my own eyes¿¿), and almost constantly uses the word ¿verily¿ which means ¿in truth¿ or ¿in fact.¿ It seems as if Ibn knows that his writings will be read and studied for many years to come. In conclusion, it comes as little surprise that Ibn¿s work has become so celebrated.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2001

    Eaters of the Dead

    'Eaters of the Dead' is based on true journal entries of an Arab Courtier by the name of Ahmad Ibn Fadlan, dating back to A.D. 921. Ibn Fadlan was sent by the Caliph of Baghdad to be an ambassador to the King of the Bulgars. The reasoning behind Ibn Fadlan being sent off was he slept with a very rich merchant¡¯s wife. So Ibn Fadlan was banished from Baghdad. On his journey to his new home Ibn Fadlan runs into a clan of Viking Warriors and is summoned to accompany 12 of the Viking Warriors to Scandinavia to help the people of a north kingdom from this ¡°mist monster¡±. Along Ibn Fadlan travels he finds the warriors social living to be somewhat disgusting and not very humanlike. The warriors are violent, very sexual and not very physically healthy. The action described in Ibn Fadlans journey is very exciting and at times I couldn¡¯t put the book down. This whole book is narrated in Ibn Fadlans voice, because the book is based on his diary like writings. At the end of the book you find out what these ¡°mist monsters¡± are. I¡¯m not going to give the ending of the book away but I suggest that if like action books this one is a keeper.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2001

    another piece of the puzzle

    A great read. Anyone who enjoyed Beowulf will love this book. Is it really from an ancient manuscript? The '13' symbolisim is very interesting. Clues to this meaning can be found in the Illuminatus!(Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson) and Hell's Angels (Hunter S. Thompson).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2001

    Another piece of the puzzle

    A quick and easy book to read. Really from an ancient manuscript? Maybe. The number 13 is signifigant. Clues to its meaning are found in The Illuminatus! trilogy and in Hunter S. Thompson's Hell's Angels.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2001

    Ibn's Journey

    Michael Crichton's Eaters of the Dead is a superior book filled with the spectacular journey of Ibn Fadlan. If I could rate this book from one to five, I think it deserves a four. I thought it was suitable how Ibn Fadlan gave a detailed description of the different societies he encountered on his journey. I also enjoyed how he respected everyone's culture, especially the Vikings. When he was with the Vikings, Ibn got to see all types of eerie things that he thought never existed. I thought it was interesting how he had the chance to come in contact with those eerie things. Another thing I thought was pretty good about the book is how Ibn Fadlan stayed devoted to his religion even when faced with many hardships. Overall I thought this was a splendid book. If you are interested in reading about the journey of Ibn Fadlan and his encounter with the Vikings, you should read this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2000

    Whoa!

    This is one of the greatest novels I've ever read. Michael Crichton's writing is great and his action sequences are set up perfectly. The only other thing I want now is a sequel. There has to be a sequel!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2000

    Not Bad

    This book was not a great book but it was worth reading. The book as always was I thought better than the movie which wasn't that bad of a movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2000

    as always

    This book has a deep history information about my fathers but its not good enough to be a bestseller because its feels like a history book not a thriller as the old books of michael crichton

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2000

    Thank GOD I saw the movie first

    Eaters of the Dead is an incredible story! I loved reading about how ibn Fadlan with his middle eastern culture and sense of morals interacts in the society of the northmen which is all so new and primitive to him. I can hardly believe the movie came from the book! The action and adventure were exciting but the most interesting was the northmen culture. It's too bad they left it out of the movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2000

    Very interesting.

    I read this book some time ago. It got me very interested in Arabic literature and the history of the Khazars. Ibn Fadlin's trip to Scandinavia is not histtorical. The movie 'The Thirteenth Warrior' is based on this historical fiction.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2000

    hasn't anyone noticed....

    This was one of Chricton's earlier works, and one I'd avoided reading. BIG mistake! Although it moves a little slowly at the beginning, it doesn't disappoint. What I've found interesting is no one has noticed that this story is Beowulf!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2