Customer Reviews for

Education of a Wandering Man

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2003

    The best Education

    It¿s been many a years since I have enjoyed and learned from a book as much as I have this masterpiece. Not only is the book a marvelous source and guide to an avid reader, but in Addition, it is sheer delight and an easy, interesting and inspiring read. Although I have finished reading this book just a few days ago, I am about to reread it yet once more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2011

    Highly recommended-a must read for every student!

    "A great book begins with an idea; a great life, with a determination." Thus begins Louis L'Amour's Education of a Wandering Man, which details L'Amour's autodidactic pursuits. L'Amour's work is a treasure. His writing displays the kind of storytelling that infuses his novels, but here he explains what L'Amour discusses not only his own work, but the writers who most influenced him. In fact, the majority of this book is about his reading life. He believes that a good writer begins life as an avid reader, and that to read broadly is what makes someone a good storyteller. In this, his most personal book ever, L'Amour writes of growing up in Jamestown, North Dakota, of the parents who instilled in him a love of the printed and spoken word, and of his decision to leave school at fifteen to make the world his classroom. While his contemporaries attended high school, L'Amour skinned cattle in Texas, worked as a circus roustabout and a mine caretaker, won small-town prizefighting exhibitions, hoboed across Texas on the Southern Pacific, and shipped out to the West Indies, England, and Singapore as a merchant seaman. Wherever he wandered, his pockets were always bulging with books. Ever both teacher and storyteller, Louis L'Amour makes his education our education, in a book filled with glorious asides on everything from hobo culture to the fate of Butch Cassidy. Here is a testament-part memoir, part reflection-in which the author bequeaths to us a most wonderful legacy of the "education of a wandering man": a life lived to the fullest through the never-ending quest for knowledge For an educator, what more could a teacher want from a student-one who is accountable and takes control of their own learning as seen by the following quotes: p. 3 - Education should provide the tools for a widening and deepening of life, for increased appreciation of all one sees or experiences. It should equip a person to live life well one must live with awareness. - No one can 'get' an education, for of necessity education is a continuing process. If it does nothing else, it should provide students with the tools for learning, acquaint them with the methods of study and research, methods of pressuring an idea. We can only hope they come upon an idea they wish to pursue. p.4 - Education depends on the quality of the teacher, not the site or beauty of the buildings - nor, I might add, does it depend on the winning record of the football team, and I like football p. 74 - Acquiring an education has many aspects, of which school is only one, and the present approach is, I believe the wrong one. Without claiming to have all of the answers, I can only express my feeling that our methods of instruction do much to hamper learning. Our approach is pedestrian. We teach a child to creep when he should be running; education becomes a task rather than excitement (a means to an end when there should never be an end). Yet each of us can remember one or two teachers who made learning an adventure, which it surely is. p. 74 - Personally, I believe children should be taught to see, to observe, and to subject what they have seen to analysis, and this in the earliest grades. p. 74 - Very young children will often learn a difficult subject easily unless someone tells them that is 'hard'. (I fear this is contagious and also spreads through peer relationships) p. 75 - I studied purely for the love of learning, wanting to know and understand. For a writer, of course, everything

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  • Posted February 10, 2011

    Great

    I really enjoyed this book. After reading his books for years it wa nice to see the background he came from.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2002

    wonderful read!!!!!!!.

    this book is great!!!. I have been reading louie's books for 5 years and have never found a book like this!!!.

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