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Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done

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  • Posted April 9, 2013

    The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Rig

    The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done by Peter Drucker focuses on self-management rather than on the management of others. The book addresses how an individual can become more effective in key activities such as time management, activity prioritization, and decision-making to the furtherance of their organization's goals.

    I believe that an organization's actions are defined by its people and not the buildings, machines, and tools they use - organizations themselves fundamentally behave like people. Subsequently, as individuals become more effective, such that their decisions and activities are increasingly focused on mission achievement, the organization itself is more likely to achieve greater levels of success. Because the principles contained within The Effective Executive focus on strong leadership, when they are built into processes and procedures, additional measurable improvements in organizational effectiveness can be achieved.

    The Effective Executive clearly and concisely conveys many powerful leadership concepts. Many of the best practice recommendations found on the StrategyDriven website relate to The Effective Executive; making it a StrategyDriven recommended read.

    All the Best,
    Nathan Ives
    StrategyDriven Principal Contributor and
    Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2009

    Easy to see why Drucker is the Father of Modern Management

    This book belongs on the shelf of anyone that calls or hopes to call themselves a professional. The points are relevant, clear and compelling. Every executive must manage their time, work on the right things, make effective decisions and read this book.

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  • Posted April 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Handy guide to becoming a top executive

    As an author and an intellectual, the late Peter F. Drucker was a true business sage. Recognized as the father of modern management, Drucker forecast numerous pivotal trends, including decentralization, privatization and the development of the information society. He introduced the concept of the "knowledge worker," a term he employs widely in this fascinating book. His internal study of General Motors, Concept of the Corporation, greatly influenced how businesses conduct their affairs. Each Drucker book is a genuine business classic, including this one. getAbstract believes it will help you think productively about what you do. No one writes more intelligently or presciently on management and its functions than Drucker. All executives, even those who are already effective, will benefit from reading this informative, enlightening book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2002

    One of the Very Top Management Books of All Time

    Revolutionary when written, The Effective Executive provides the fund of ideas on which most subsequent management works draw. To fully understand today's cutting edge business concepts, you must, absolutely must, first understand Drucker and read his original writings. The Effective Exectuive caused many in the business and academic worlds to scratch their heads asking 'Why didn't I think of that?' The answer: they had focused on many of the trees in the forest about which Drucker wrote ('first things first' and 'know thy time' and 'effective decisions'), but they had not stepped back far enough to see the whole landscape and appreciate how the individual trees fit together. After reading The Effective Executive you will want to read challenging new works such as 'Why Didn't I Think of That? - Think the Unthinkable and Achieve Creative Greatness' where the author takes you to the highest levels of current creative managerial thought so that you, unlike your predecessors in the pre-Drucker days, will not end up having to ask yourself 'Why didn't I think of that?'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2001

    Being a Help Rather Than a Bother

    Have you ever run into executives who create more harm than good? Do you realize that some people may see you that way, at least in some situations. One of the most famous quotes by Peter Drucker is that he sometimes refers to himself as an 'insultant' rather than a consultant. His straight talk in this book will direct you onto the right path for helping your organization accomplish more. Peter Drucker begins this book by pointing out that there is no science of how to improve executive effectiveness, nor any naturally-occurring effective executives. The redeeming point of this problem is that he argues that executive effectiveness can be learned. The principles begin with a focus on time management. We can get greater quantities of every other resource we need, except time. Drucker reports that executives spend their time much differently than they think they do and much differently than they would like to. His solution is to begin by measuring how you spend your time, and compare it with an ideal allocation. Than begin to systematically get rid of the unimportant in favor of the important. His suggestions include stopping some things, delegation, creating policy decisions to replace ad hoc decisions, staying out of things that others should do, and so forth. Any student of time management will recognize the list he suggests. One of the best points is to give yourself large blocks of uninterrupted time to do more significant tasks. He also cautions us not to cut down on time spent with other people. If an hour is required, don't try to do it in 15 minutes. Next, Drucker argues that we should focus on what will make a difference rather than unimportant questions. Otherwise, we will fill our time with motion rather than proceeding towards results. Beyond that, he points out that we have to build on our own strengths and those of the people in our organization. That is how we can outperform the competition and accomplish much more. We also need to be systems thinkers, getting to the core of the issue first. If you would like to know more about that subject, look at The Fifth Discipline. For example, if you are weak on new products, you need to work on the new product development process before fine-tuning your marketing. If you reverse the order of these activities, your results will be far less. Perhaps the best section in the book has to do with executive decision-making, when to make a decision, about what, and what principles to apply. If you only read this section, you would be well rewarded for studying this fine book. I especially liked the familiar Drucker use of important historical examples to make his points. You'll remember the principles better because the examples are so vivid. Although this book was written some time ago, it retains the strength of its insight today. Truly , this is a timeless way to achieve greater effectiveness. You may be concerned about how you are going to learn to apply these concepts. That is actually quite easy. Drucker provides questions in each section that will guide you, step-by-step, to focus your attention on the most promising areas. If you only read one book about how to improve your personal effectiveness as an executive, you will find this to be a rewarding choice. If you liked what Peter Drucker had to say in this book, you may want to read his latest book, Management Challenges for the 21st Century, to get your agenda for using the skills you developed from The Effective Executive. Donald Mitchell, co-author of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution

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    Posted January 4, 2009

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