Customer Reviews for

Elijah of Buxton

Average Rating 4
( 58 )
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(31)

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(7)

2 Star

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Highly Recommended

Great book for summer reading

posted by csi-51 on April 30, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Boring

I hated this book. It was boring and hard to understand. Not worth it!

posted by Anonymous on November 17, 2012

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  • Posted April 30, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Great book for summer reading

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    great read for kids

    Newbery winning author Christopher Paul Curtis has written 2 of my favorite historical novels, "Bud, Not Buddy" and now "Elijah of Buxton". I'd recommend both these books to anyone, but especially to kids aged 8-12.Elijah is a free-born boy growing up in the real town of Buxton, Ontario, a place where former slaves lived in relative safety before the Civil War. When a thief steals the money intended to buy a slave family's freedom, Elijah sets off in pursuit to get the money back. On his journey, he must avoid bounty hunters looking for runaway slaves to take back to the US. Determined to do the right thing, Elijah is optimistic, resourseful, and very brave.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 9, 2009

    Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Pual Curtis

    In the Newberry Medal winning story, Elijah of Buxton, Elijah is a cowardly eleven year old living in a free settlement in Canada. He is the first child born free in the settlement of Buxton. During the celebration Elijah Freeman threw up on Fredrick Douglas, who was considered to be the smartest man who had ever escaped from slavery. Elijah is an excellent worker and fisher, but is very afraid of snakes and other simple things in life. The preacher, who carries around a pistol everywhere he goes, says that his talent of fishing is a true gift from above. When Mr. Leroy, who is a friend of Elijah's, earns enough money to buy his family out of slavery, the preacher, who was thought to have been a friend, steals his money. Elijah sets off and crosses the American border into Michigan to hunt the preacher down and get Mr. Leroy's money back.
    Although the story progresses slowly, and younger readers may become bored very quickly, Christopher Paul Curtis does a great job at introducing almost everybody in Buxton. He makes you feel like your right in the story, experiencing everything the main character (Elijah) goes through and all of his adventures. This was the best book I have ever read, thank you Christopher Paul Curtis.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2008

    Entertaining nonstop adventure

    Elijah of Buxton is a hero for youngsters of all ages. Elijah of Buxton is laugh out loud humor and powerful history combined in one book. Christopher Paul Curtis has written another powerful story to make us understand history clearer. Mr. Curtis is able to bring the characters to life with each page. You can feel the joy and pain the slaves, freedmen and former slaves feel in the style Mr. Curtis writes. I recommend this book to all teachers for the classroom, history buffs and avid readers.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Beauty

    ELIJAH SEXY

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    Me

    Loved this book

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    Awesome Book

    Very intresting book!! I love that this book has cliff hangers and lots of suspense that makes you not want to put the book down!! I highly reccomend buying this book!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2013

    Elijah

    I think that it was very insightful and i like how Elijah is very detailed in the book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2013

    Kcwassup

    I really lov books lik the/ wastons go to birmingham-1963.but ths book is really cool too!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2013

    Emily's review

    My fav part was when Elijah put the toady frog in mama's sweater and for payback mama put a snake in the cookie jar

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    Super bowl sunday!!!!

    Ravens v. 49 ers type to Skyler....... SUPER BOWL!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Anonymus

    I love this it is so great. Also very adventourus or however you spell that I don't have a grammer check! So dont push me Im tired so exuse my spelling.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2014

    great story love this book

    great story love this book

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  • Posted August 7, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Amazing Ending! You will not be able to put this book down!

    The characters in this book are so well developed you'll feel like you know them. The book slows somewhat in the middle, but hang in there. The ending is absolutely incredible. And get your tissues. Thank you, Christopher Paul Curtis, for this brillant piece of work.

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  • Posted May 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Another piece of history, well told

    My son loves this author and really enjoyed the book.
    Although is was a difficult time to think about, I think the lesson needs to continue for each generation. Freedom was not easily earned, but so precious.

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  • Posted March 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Elijah of Buxton - Great read aloud, slow developing plot, fantastic overall story.

    Elijah of Buxton is the first freeborn child of Buxton a settlement on Lake Erie in Canada created by escaped slaves in the mid 1800's. Elijah tells the story of his ordinary life who his momma is continually telling him that he is too frag - ile. However, as we travel with him as he does his chores, does odd jobs in the settlement, interacts with the characters that have become central in his life, and of course going to school we find that Elijah is not an ordinary boy at all. He has a gift of story telling and creative exaggeration with explanations that achieve and surpass the best metaphors and similes penned by even the classic tall tale authors of all times. While the literary style and tone is expertly done with subtle events and happenings being wove together for a powerful climax the plot is agonizingly slow moving. The first chapters are more like short stories tied together with the passing of time and Elijah's struggle for recognition as an adult as his values and character is discovered by the reader. It might be a good read aloud, but I wonder how many young readers will maintain enough interest to read through most of the book. It isn't until the reader is closing in on the end that the plot finally unfolds a multi chapter event with enough excitement to propel the reader to a compelling ending. An ending that can only be achieved by a character who has gained enough insight into the complicated decisions of an adult world and a reader that has gained insight into the complications of slavery in the United States in the 1860's.

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  • Posted February 14, 2009

    Worthy of the Awards

    Christopher Paul Curtis' latest masterpiece is truly worthy of the awards it has received. The story of young Elijah Freeman made me laugh and cry.<BR/><BR/>Elijah is the first child born into freedom in Buxton, Canada. The novel takes the reader through daily life in the settlement for a frag-ile child tryin' to be grown. <BR/><BR/>While it took me a few chapters to get into the book, I was soon absorbed in the story. The writing is full of humor and everything is seen through Elijah's eyes. By the time I reached the last page I was left wanting more!

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  • Posted December 14, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Jasmyn Vason- Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis

    This book was about the life lessons of a young, fragile African American boy, who is set out on a mission to fulfill a friend¿s dying wish. His friend had been saving money to buy his family out of slavery in the South, but the money gets stolen. So, he heads out on a perilous journey to fulfill his friend¿s wish of catching the thief. Along the way, Elijah experiences the terrible horrors of slavery and wonders if he will have the bravery to come back home. <BR/><BR/> I really enjoyed this book in some areas. I liked how the text of the book was written in the time frame of the narrator¿s language. It made me feel the true effect of the story during that time. I liked the way the story taught real-life lessons in certain situations. It made me realize, as a young person, why things are to be done a certain way. One important lesson I learned was that you have to see things the way they are and not the way you wish them to be. That stuck with me throughout the rest of the book. I liked the way the author used different words to depict the scenery of the book, so that the reader could visualize the setting clearly. I also liked the main character, Elijah, because throughout all the life lessons he learned, he learned a very valuable one at a young age. He learned how to be courageous. I learned that it does not take a big person to be brave, but it takes a big heart instead. I admired Elijah¿s parents because they taught him the foundation of courage. <BR/><BR/> However, I disliked this book in certain areas. I did not like the fact that it reached to almost the end of the book before the main plot actually began. I believe that the story was written backwards in a way because of that. The plot was not even introduced throughout the beginning and the middle of the book. I felt like all the other events before the plot was irrelevant to the main plot too. Some of the things that happened before then were not even interesting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2008

    John

    Amazing. This is the best of Christophers books. About the only Book that he has wrote that compares is Bud,Not buddy. I recommend this book to anyone who likes to laugh a little.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2008

    Birth of a Classic

    Newbery Medal winner Christopher Paul Curtis' latest novel chronicles a young boy's amazing journey into manhood, leaving readers laughing and crying along the way. The first few chapters are deceptive- I laughed so much that I doubted whether I would ever get to the 'real' issues at hand for the eleven year old protagonist, Elijah. Reminiscient of Tom Sawyer, Elijah is immediately likable because of his frank observations of adult behavior and his own pranks in response to their rigid behavioral guidelines. After falling in love with Elijah and his antics, readers are made aware of the significance of his life: he is the first free African American born in Buxton, a real-life settlement in Canada that was home to run away slaves in the 1800's. As Elijah struggles to prove to his parents that he is becoming a man (he struggles to shake the 'fragile' image he has had as a child), he learns valuable lessons about his own conscience. Throughout his page-turning adventures, he learns, from some very interesting characters, lessons about doing and saying what is right, even when it means doing something he doesn't necessarily want to do. Elijah has some hilarious discussions with himself that will draw young readers into his plight. Once Curtis hooks readers with humor, the author teaches valuable lessons about cultural identity, maturity, parent/child relationships, and the one that Elijah struggles with most often- when to speak, and when to be silent. The first person point of view offers readers a young boy's insight into the painful world of slavery, and will help children explore the issue without the guilt of ignorance. Elijah himself is ignorant, being born into a free country and having only heard stories of slavery that seemed foreign to him, and asks questions born of innocence: What difference does a border make? How can a person be free on one side and enslaved on another? Why don't they all just run away? Unfortunately for Elijah, the the answers to these questions come in shocking ways he never expected. elijah's journey offers social awareness with a hopeful outlook. I highly recommend this book for children age 10 and older. This would be an excellent introduction to so many topics- maturation, moral dilema, social consciousness, history of slavery and the Underground Railroad in America (real life abolitionist Frederick Douglas is a prominent figure in Elijah's life), and too many developmental issues to name. I would love to see this book make it to the reading list for middle schoolers it would be perfect for Language Arts and/or Social Studies. As an experienced teacher, I am confident that all readers would enjoy this one- it's too funny, too clever, and too exciting not to.

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