Customer Reviews for

Enduring Love

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Life: Who's in Control?

Just when one thinks that existence couldn't get any better than this, the ofetn overlooked details converge to unravel the larger tapestry of life. Small threads of doubt and mistrust directed toward others inevitably return and manifest themselves in a gut-wrenching ...
Just when one thinks that existence couldn't get any better than this, the ofetn overlooked details converge to unravel the larger tapestry of life. Small threads of doubt and mistrust directed toward others inevitably return and manifest themselves in a gut-wrenching questioning of one's own fallibility. Such is the case with Joe Rose, the main character of Ian McEwan's novel 'Enduring Love.' An idyllic day of intended sharing and unencumbered love above a sweeping English meadow is unraveled by a tragic event that will forever change Joe's life. McEwan's captivatingly eloqent account of the balloon accident in the first chapter does more than hook the reader and set the basis for all later plot situations. It leads the reader to ponder the perplexity of the human condition. It conjures up questions of human values. Just how far are you willing to go to save someone else's life? What personal price are you willing to pay in order to help someone else? Are you willing to face the future challenges that may result from your present actions? 'Enduring Love' is more than a novel that recounts the oftentimes undesirable outcome of actions taken simply because they were right at the moment. The balloon accident is the key that opens the door to other personal revelations and challenges that lay hidden inside Joe Rose. Even though Joe and Clarissa's relationship is more complicated than simply having great sex, I got the impression that that was about the only honest connection that they shared. Joe (a science journalist) views the world as scientific theories and mathematical equations, whereas Clarissa (a professor of literature) perceives life as being a continuously romantic Keats poem. This disparity of perception between them gets more complicated when Jed Parry (a young man who was also galvanized into action during the balloon tragedy) turns out to have a homoerotic obsession for Joe brought about by their ill-fated sharing of a tragedy and a deranged mental condition de Clerambault's syndrome. As Jed begins a shedule of stalking Joe with the intent of bringing him closer to God, Joe and Clarissa begin to question the lack of trust and support between them. They find themselves battling a commitment to each other that never really appeared to be there from the start. If there had been, it would have taken more than Joe's uncontrolled urge to rifle through the personal letters in Clarissa's desk to possibly end the marriage. I found Clarissa to be a self-absorbed person who failed to internalize the romantic compassion of love one learns from literature. This brings me to a few other events in the novel that I found to be a bit implausible. It seems a bit fantastic that Clarissa would not be overly concerned about a man who would obsessively stand across the street and watch her husband's every move. It also seems a bit peculiar that when Jed Parry decides to act, he chooses a public restaurant packed with patrons when he had many more private opportunities. However, who knows what goes on in the minds of those deranged? I grew perturbed that someone as cerebral as Joe would fail to think of easily available means of proving his case. Why wouldn't he merely take Clarissa to the window and show her the deranged man consistently standing across the street? Or better yet, tell her to watch for the man scurrying up the street to avoid being detected by her when she walked out of the door. As a reader, I grew frustrated with the characterization. Rarely have I read a novel where I often didn't care what happened to the protagonist. I didn't fully feel connected to Joe and his conflict. A reader who finds displeasure in reducing life's happenings into black and white scientific theories will find this novel tedious. However, those readers who marvel at the complexities of human nature will find Ian McEwan's book engaging.

posted by Anonymous on June 12, 2000

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Interesting psychodrama

If you like psychodrama, you will probably like this. Certainly, the opening chapter is rivieting, but the rest of the book doesn't quite measure up. I read it for a book club, but probably would not have finished it otherwise. There is a nice mystery here, but there...
If you like psychodrama, you will probably like this. Certainly, the opening chapter is rivieting, but the rest of the book doesn't quite measure up. I read it for a book club, but probably would not have finished it otherwise. There is a nice mystery here, but there are better reads out there. don't read the other reviews here -- they give away too much of the plot. I guarantee you will enjoy it less if you know the ending before you start.

posted by Anonymous on July 16, 2001

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2001

    Interesting psychodrama

    If you like psychodrama, you will probably like this. Certainly, the opening chapter is rivieting, but the rest of the book doesn't quite measure up. I read it for a book club, but probably would not have finished it otherwise. There is a nice mystery here, but there are better reads out there. don't read the other reviews here -- they give away too much of the plot. I guarantee you will enjoy it less if you know the ending before you start.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2000

    Life: Who's in Control?

    Just when one thinks that existence couldn't get any better than this, the ofetn overlooked details converge to unravel the larger tapestry of life. Small threads of doubt and mistrust directed toward others inevitably return and manifest themselves in a gut-wrenching questioning of one's own fallibility. Such is the case with Joe Rose, the main character of Ian McEwan's novel 'Enduring Love.' An idyllic day of intended sharing and unencumbered love above a sweeping English meadow is unraveled by a tragic event that will forever change Joe's life. McEwan's captivatingly eloqent account of the balloon accident in the first chapter does more than hook the reader and set the basis for all later plot situations. It leads the reader to ponder the perplexity of the human condition. It conjures up questions of human values. Just how far are you willing to go to save someone else's life? What personal price are you willing to pay in order to help someone else? Are you willing to face the future challenges that may result from your present actions? 'Enduring Love' is more than a novel that recounts the oftentimes undesirable outcome of actions taken simply because they were right at the moment. The balloon accident is the key that opens the door to other personal revelations and challenges that lay hidden inside Joe Rose. Even though Joe and Clarissa's relationship is more complicated than simply having great sex, I got the impression that that was about the only honest connection that they shared. Joe (a science journalist) views the world as scientific theories and mathematical equations, whereas Clarissa (a professor of literature) perceives life as being a continuously romantic Keats poem. This disparity of perception between them gets more complicated when Jed Parry (a young man who was also galvanized into action during the balloon tragedy) turns out to have a homoerotic obsession for Joe brought about by their ill-fated sharing of a tragedy and a deranged mental condition de Clerambault's syndrome. As Jed begins a shedule of stalking Joe with the intent of bringing him closer to God, Joe and Clarissa begin to question the lack of trust and support between them. They find themselves battling a commitment to each other that never really appeared to be there from the start. If there had been, it would have taken more than Joe's uncontrolled urge to rifle through the personal letters in Clarissa's desk to possibly end the marriage. I found Clarissa to be a self-absorbed person who failed to internalize the romantic compassion of love one learns from literature. This brings me to a few other events in the novel that I found to be a bit implausible. It seems a bit fantastic that Clarissa would not be overly concerned about a man who would obsessively stand across the street and watch her husband's every move. It also seems a bit peculiar that when Jed Parry decides to act, he chooses a public restaurant packed with patrons when he had many more private opportunities. However, who knows what goes on in the minds of those deranged? I grew perturbed that someone as cerebral as Joe would fail to think of easily available means of proving his case. Why wouldn't he merely take Clarissa to the window and show her the deranged man consistently standing across the street? Or better yet, tell her to watch for the man scurrying up the street to avoid being detected by her when she walked out of the door. As a reader, I grew frustrated with the characterization. Rarely have I read a novel where I often didn't care what happened to the protagonist. I didn't fully feel connected to Joe and his conflict. A reader who finds displeasure in reducing life's happenings into black and white scientific theories will find this novel tedious. However, those readers who marvel at the complexities of human nature will find Ian McEwan's book engaging.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Enduring Love Captures Your Soul And Stays With You A Long Time

    McEwan continues to dazzle us with his diversified approach to writing. At one moment he is describing the full bloom of vegetation in an inviting park, in exquisite detail, and in the next he is using street vernacular to identify the sexual act of two lovers. This is what makes him so unique and palatable. You read a little, and want more of the book, and then want to start another one. I'm enthused with the idea of being able to read any of McEwan's work in any order. He does not bow down to the tireless drivel of serials.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2009

    It's McEwan

    I always have a bit of a tough time reading this reknowned author and this book is no exception. I read and read, almost forcing myself to get through the pages, run across a few accounts that are quite stimulating and imaginative, and then read and read again. Then the book is over. Perhaps I should stop trying to like McEwan?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 22, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Disturbing

    One of the best books I have read and one of the most disturbing. From a chance encounter one's whole world can change and become a nightmare.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2007

    Excellent

    Colorful prose with visuals that place you at the scene. The weight of emotional young love anchors the reader throughout to the end. Not only a story about love, but a story of chance and conviction sometimes two opposites that never attract. Cant wait to read another one of his books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2004

    Wrong Title - Right Book

    As with so many novels, the title reveals nothing. (Are we running out of book titles?) The title suggests a pulp novel. The reality presented, as in any McEwan novel, is from the outset a series of modern moral choices, and the sequellae that may flow from those choices when taken. Some of these choices must be taken in the throes of an emergency. Some are undertaken after great deliberation, or under the control of a poweful obsession. McEwan has the consummate skill to cocoon these choices, and their outcomes, in the shell of a good story. This is a thinking person's novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2004

    recommended

    This was my first McEwan novel and it held my attention from page one. He took the story from one plane to another while holding the central themes of obsession and forgiveness. One thing that drew me to this author was the commitment of his readers and now I can see why. This won't be my last.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2004

    Absolutely astonishing! Read all Mr. McEwan's books!

    A deliciously exhilarating plot is to be found in Enduring Love. What an absolute joy to be thoroughly immersed in the main character's flight as he is stalked by a shadowy man with whom he has shared a terrifying event (the attempt to save a boy from death in a runaway balloon.) Again, Mr. McEwan fascinates the reader by drawing us into rich plots and undertones of meaning. The main character is haunted by the man at every turn: If he parts the curtains of his apt., the man is there. Telephone calls and disturbing street meetings lead to a final confrontation preceeded by carefully layered plot and rich characterization. As with so many of Mr. McEwan's books, one will re-read them carefully, savoring every turn of the page. As in Black Dogs, Atonement and Amsterdam, readers experience the thrill of the moment and the ingenious literary skills of a true master. Read everything by this author. His works are literary gems. Kathryn Forrester, Poet Laureate Emeritus of Virginia

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2003

    Enduring love - Love that is endured? or Love that is enduring?

    At First i was intrigued by the opening chapter but as the novel developed i became more curious and impatient to find out what would happen later. I believe this novel gets better as you read it and that there are alot of links with the title throughout. There are 2 sides to Joe in this - the scientific side and the story telling side, often Joe detaches himself from his current situations by telling them as an onlooker in a story form. In real life people can relate to this as in awkward situations you wish you could detach yourself away from it. Jed Parrys views on matters stem from religious beliefs - he see`s Joe as a challenge because he believes it is his duty to bring him to God. This novel is a gripping and exciting read and i would recommend it to anyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2003

    stupendous

    the book is easy to read has many cliff hangers which keeps the reader in suspence. The first chapter of enduring love is the heart of the book as it brings the book to life. I have also enjoyed the characters in the novel as they all bring new stories into the novel. The use of film convention in the book is prehaps the cleverest. Overall 'a fantastic book to read'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2002

    It's all about obsession

    I'm also reading this book for my English Literature AS level course. Being just 16 I find the lexis very hard to grasp yet the majority is enthralling! The first chapter captures you, forcing an obsession upon yourself so that you have to read on. The descriptions of actions are just as exciting yet McEwan tends to sway off of the subject, over-doing it slightly with the scientific knowledge of Joe Rose. Apart from that, a truely expertly written novel- much recommended by myself!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2001

    Easy-to-read

    One of the most provocative piece of Ian McEwan-- Enduring Love introduces a new kind of reevaluation and hidden conflicts of society and life, through a deliberate coherent, analytical narration. McEwan cleverly bridges different genres: psychological thriller and tragic love story into a novel of ideas that mirrors the world in a contemporary sense. A reunited couple, a bottle of wine following by a catastrophe begins Joe¿s report on a tale of chaos. The protagonist, Joe Rose, a scientific writer, and his wife, Clarissa who is a romantic literature professor witness the balloon accident which causes a doctor¿s (Mr. Logan) life in the process of saving his grandchild. While Joe, one of the helpers hangs on to the rope, starts suspecting himself as the first one who lets go and causes his death, another helper, Jed Parry who suffers de Clérambault Syndrome comes along and insists praying together will help relieving his guilt. Although Joe refuses, his glances and looks only initiate Jed¿s obsession. The dreadful disaster recalls heartbreaking memory for the couple who are ¿unable to bear children.¿ (31) When both of them are trying to bury their sorrow and fix up the loving relationship through love and sex, Jed intrudes their orderly life. First with numerous phone calls and messages, later, love letters and spying across the street, Jed is only anxious but never tired in revealing his infatuation to Joe who merely diagnoses his feelings through scientific and rational logic and theories which, indeed, fails him to make sense of his behavior and Clarissa¿s ignorance and annoyance against his obstinacy to a stranger¿s craze. As Jed¿s interference becomes more irritating and his marriage starts falling apart, Joe reaches out for help; nevertheless, police neglect his complaint until he claims to identify Jed in the shooting scene which happens on Clarissa¿s birthday while a professor (Jocelyn), Clarissa, and himself are having lunch and discussing Keats. Yet, due to Joe¿s fragmented statement and unreliable assertion of Jed¿s attempted murder, contrary to other witnesses¿, police are not the least convinced. The rational Joe, finding no way for rescue, feels the urge for self-defense and buys a gun. As Joe predicts and calculates, Jed breaks in their house and pleads for forgiveness when he admits his attempted murder. Joe¿s rationale hesitates and leaves Jed no choice but threatens him with his own life. After careful calculation, Joe shoots him. When chaos is over and problems are solved, Joe assumes his marriage would heal through greater intimacy. But Clarissa, finding herself unable to fit in Joe¿s logical world, only thanks him for his heroic rescue and leaves him for good in order to preserve her own values of love. Enduring Love wages war between science, art, and religion, through a unique exploration of love. A story of Joe, a symbol of systematic logic and reasons, Clarissa, a symbol of romantic poet¿Keats, and Jed, an extreme romantic attachment with distorted values of love, are recounted and interpreted in a history narrative form and in the language of science logic and rationalism. Science, dominating the Western culture since Enlightenment in 18th century, is deemed as pure absolutes, powerful knowledge, and necessity of survival that triumphs art and religion which have now been degraded for leisure spiritual appreciation and luxury. This dramatic change has lasted until today where our mainstreamed culture, society, and life are still constructed in preference of scientific results and logical process, rather than natural tendency for feelings and knowledge of God. Ian McEwan, in his post-modern masterpiece, has defeated science when Joe, being a loner, loses Clarissa and reestablished the irreplaceable importance of love as Jed, with no regrets, is kept in a mental institution where he is still free to love and Clarissa successfully preserves her values of love. Enduring Love awakens those w

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2000

    Excellent Book

    Im only 16 but i found this book really enjoyable. It was a great book and you really get into it. The opening chapters are a great setting to the book and they absorb the readers into other peoples life. As the story unfolds, the book just gets better and better and I feel this book is one of the best I have read. I will continue to read his novels if they are anything like this and would recommend the novel to anyone no matter what age.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2