Customer Reviews for

Everyman

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    Review on Everyman

    This was the first book I have read by Philip Roth. Even though it was very depressing, it was hard to put it down. He writes very descriptively and one gets avery clear picture of what he is saying. As to the essence of the book he pictures this man, and therefore life, in general, as nothing but a series of bad experiences with the BIG LAST EXPERIENCE AS DEATH. One can focus on this type of jouney of life or one can focus on all the beautiful and wonderful aspects of life. This is what we have been given by our maker. This is what we have on this earth. It is up to us to do with it what we will. Do the best we can, make a difference, be morally upright and be at peace when our time is up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2012

    Intense

    Despite it being an easy and short read, it's an intense and rather depressing story... close up of death and what every one hopes to come before it: old age... "old age isn't a battle, old age is a massacre".... still worth the read if you are not at the brink of depression!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Everyman ..... a must read for ex's..... women in particular

    Philip Roth pulls together feelings about "everymans" ordinary life. The sometimes unspeakable truth about how good men deal with bad situations is revieled in a short but topical novel.

    Divorce, children, affairs, and repenting are all dicussed in a poinyant yet subtle story. For men who dont like to discuss their feelings to women who jsut don't understand what makes men do some of the things they do, "Everyman" explains a lot.

    This is a very easy read. Great for novice readers. Probably PG-13 at a minimum.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 7, 2008

    i love Philip Roth and i liken him to Joyce Carol Oates in talent and literary giftedness.

    I am not yet finished with EVERYMAN BUT AM really enjoying reading it. Being Jewish myself, i can relate to the details surrounding the funeral. We have all been there. I love just about everything Philip Roth writes and this is no exception. I happened to come upon it in a thrift store and had to have it. His details are so perfect. His writing is so sincere. I continue to be a fan.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2007

    A 'How Not To' Lesson

    I very much enjoyed the character development and manner Roth chose to tell this story. I'm afraid many will relate all to closely to the choices made by this man, choices with a negative impact on everyone in his family. It's really a story of how we shouldn't live our lives, at least from a moral perspective. Here was a talented and successful, hard working man, who missed what is really important in this one chance we get. If conveying this message was Mr. Roth's intent then the point is well made.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2007

    Trite and predictable

    This extremely brief book reads more like a depressing short story than a fully realized novel. It took me less than 1 day to whip through this account of the relentlessly deteriorating health of the protagonist, his multiple surgical procedures and failed relationships with women. I personally do not need to read about the graphic details of the caricature-like older man's affair with the young beauty in order to be satisfied with a story.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2007

    Stunning

    I've admired Philip Roth's work since high school, when I read 'Conversion of the Jews' in a short story/novella class. I was intrigued by Sabbath's Theater 'is anyone beyond redemption?', very moved by American Pastoral 'a great American novel about the myth of the American Dream', and amazed by The Human Stain 'American 'morality' shown for the hypocrisy so many have let it become'. And now, with Everyman, Philip Roth has done it again. This story is nothing less than a contemplation on mortality as seen through the failing of one human being's anatomy. It's a short novel, but it's filled to brimming with passion, ideas, and the question of what it is that truly defines what it means to exist (while thinking every day, in the back of one's mind, of how death is the greatest mystery and one from which nothing that breathes may ever escape). Though it may seem an intensely moribund novel, it is, considered in its entirety, incredibly moving - even life affirming. Philip Roth has taken an ordinary human being and, without falling on cheaply contrived authorial mechanics (quite a feat), has presented an unnamed person 'all of us, really' in a manner that is as complex as it is inevitable. I will not go into plot, for doing so would threaten to lessen the experience for one who has yet to read this novel. And though I feel ambivalent about awards 'where aesthetics exist, they are prickly things', were it that, with Everyman, Philip Roth received a second Pulitzer, I would feel that some form of literary justice had been served. With each novel, Philip Roth again does something he accomplished long ago: he proves himself one of the great writers in American fiction.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2007

    Everyman

    In the 15th century English morality play Everyman, the titular character is summoned by Death and learns that no other friends, worldly goods nor beauty will go with him -- none except good deeds. In American author Philip Roth's identically named latest novel, the protagonist ponders whether he possesses much of any of those things in the first place. The novel opens at the burial of the unnamed protagonist, where Roth clumsily makes two characters deliver eulogies that outline his life to the reader. Rising from a working-class Jewish childhood in New Jersey to become a New York advertising man, he spent his last years at a private retirement community on the Jersey shore. He is close to his daughter and his elder brother, but also has three failed marriages and two estranged sons. As the narrative moves back in time to the protagonist's own thoughts as he awaits surgery, the reader learns he has had his share of the good and the bad. But the defining characteristics of his life is his battle for it not to end. In and out of hospital for various bodily failures all his life, from a hernia in his childhood to collapsing arteries in his old age, much of his musings are on the failty of the human body. Roth devotes large chunks of text to describing hospital stays and operations, and the descriptions are admirable in detail and depressing in content. The deterioration of the protagonist's body over the years also physically parallels the deterioration of his life over the years. His life succumbs to forces he cannot seem to control -- generally emotional, frequently sexual. Betraying a series of wives because he lusts and longs for someone or something else, he leaves behind a trail of wounded women and confused children. These dysfunctional relationships make up the bulk of the novel, and he recalls his past decisions with a mixture of regret and resignation. Unfortunately, it can be hard to care about any of these characters -- and consequently, the protagonist himself -- since Roth seems content to leave them as sketches, without quirks and inconsistencies. There is the successful elder brother, the vulnerable daughter, the trinity of ex-wives 'shrew, saint and ditz, respectively', and even a wise gravedigger who appears at the end to provide an epiphany. Perhaps Roth intended his characters, like in a morality play, to embody various human virtues and vices. In any case, they are trotted in for the protagonist to muse upon what it means to be human, without being convincingly human themselves.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2006

    'Aint No Lovin' Like Jersey Lovin'

    Wow just wow, a book about the story of a life of a New Jersey Jewish immagrant. Although it is fiction it makes a great case for the lives that everyday people live. Travel through the life of one man who as the book starts out dies, and have him grow on you as you get further in the book. Some of his decisions and actions are unforgiveable but you learn how the person that commits them lives with them, which is just a great insight into the minds of ordinary people, as this book, Everman, can symbolize my or even your life as it unfolds, getting sick, having family problems, lossing loved ones, and comming to an old age and dying.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2006

    A Huge dissapointment

    'Everyman ' the newest novel by Philip Roth is a huge disappointment for me, as I usually enjoy every novel from this talented writer. Though Mr. Roth writes well there is no question about his ability to write, the question is where's the story. I was thoroughly bored with the character the novel is about. Opening on his death and burial then back to his life, seems to be filled with his preoccupation of his health, sickness and surgeries. When not dealing with his, Roth has chosen to comment on others that surround him. I would like to think that it is only because this story is depressing, but I do believe that it is because this is a not an interesting story to tell. A novel needs to be written well but I think it also must have a good story. I look forward to the next novel Mr. Roth writes and will hope he finds himself a different muse.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2006

    The 'Massacre' which is Old Age

    Philip Roth¿s `Everyman¿ is a tale especially appropriate to our time and situation. In tracing the life and death, and above all, the old age of his protagonist and everyman a retired thrice- married and thrice- divorced commercial artist he gives an insight into what most of us have already experienced some of , and will probably know a great deal of before we leave the world. He gives a chilling chronicle of what Old Age does to people. In what I found to be the most instructive passage of the book he reflects after speaking to three former colleagues each devastated in his own way on the end of life. ¿Had he been aware of the mortal suffering of every man and woman he happened to have known during all his years of professional life, of each one¿s painful story of regret and loss and stoicism , of fear and panic and isolation and dread, had he learned of every last thing they had parted with that once had been vitally theirs and of how, systematically, they were being destroyed , he would have had to stay on the phone through the day and into the night, making another hundred calls at least. Old age isn¿t a battle it¿s a massacre.¿ Roth gives a sympathetic picture of a hero who has come to the end of his life, cut off from most of those he should be close with. But he also portrays vividly the joys and loves of that life, its major decisions and foul- ups. And in telling nuanced dialogue it sets forth the complex set of relations between the protagonist and his one loving daughter, two resentful sons, and the second wife whose abandonment has been his greatest crime and failure. This book does not have the comic genius of some of Roth¿s earlier work, but it does have a sober, sensitive insightful and ultimately moving portrayal of what the human being goes through at the end of days. Whether it is a masterpiece is a question, it certainly is a most outstanding instance of that Literature which sees deeply into Life, and enhances it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2006

    A magnificent book, both erudite and readable

    This is a magnificent book. Roth has performed a remarkable feat: Creating a book which is both erudite and immensely readable. I read it in a single day. As I read the Keats poem at the beginning, I was reminded of another poem which could also serve as an entry to this book: from Yeats' 'Sailing to Byzantium': 'This is no country for old men. The young in one another's arms...' This is my choice to present to my book club during its next season here in our retirement community.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2006

    A boon for the suicidal!!!

    I just have to say thank you to Phillip Roth for reminding us that life is short it ultimately adds up to nothing and there are millions of people who are essentially living just to take up space, hurt others, eat, and then die. This was very well written and an easy read I enjoyed it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2006

    Thoroughly Enjoyed

    As soon as I got to the end, I was compelled to go back to the very first page and start over again. Wonderfully written -- it brings the reader face to face with mortality. Reminding us that that the human body, and human relationships, are frail. Thank you, Phillip Roth, for this insightful story!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2006

    Why the guy has it going on

    I like Mr. Roth's work for two reasons: One, he doesn't shy away from controversial topics (the way J.T. McCrae and Palahniuk don't), and Two, he is a great writer. To find one of these qualities in an author is rare, but to find them coupled together in one is mind-boggeling. And the guy hasn't just written ONE book, but many. I first became familiar with Roth's work via PORTNOY'S COMPLAINT which just blew me away. Then I read all his other books and couldn't get enough. If there is one writer America can be proud of, it's Mr. Roth. Kudos.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2006

    From Inside the Age Cage

    'Old age isn't a battle old age is a massacre.' Philip Roth in this brief 180 page latest book offers us an extended elegy about the processes of living and dying, and in his customary succinct style he manages to share the anxieties and fears and philosophical changes that pepper our lives as we tread from the memories of childhood to the realities of facing death. It is a beautifully designed and realized touching series of thoughts on the meaning of living a life. The nameless Everyman relating the story is a familiar Roth creation: the child of a Jewish diamond and watch salesman, he grows up in New Jersey with his 'near perfect' brother Howie, manages to stumble through three marriages sire two sons and a daughter, and move through life never quite connecting with the moment. We meet him at novel's beginning at his funeral and the book is a retrospective of his life. And at novel's end, after walking us through the errors of his life and the treasured moments of his childhood and his time with his various wives, estranged sons, beloved daughter and the constant Howie, our main character reaches out to the world that is left as he faces his umpteenth surgery and brush with death by telephoning old acquaintances: 'Had be been aware of the mortal suffering of every man and woman he happened to have known during all his years of professional life, of each one's painful story of regret and loss and stoicism, of fear and panic and isolation and dread, had he learned of every last thing they had parted with that had once been vitally theirs and of how, systematically, they were being destroyed, he would have had to stay on the phone through the day and into the night, making at least another hundred calls at least'.This is writing of the highest order, brief, touching, illuminating, caring. To read Roth is to look in the mirror, reminding us that while living we can make changes and alter destiny - to a point: and that does help. Highly recommended. Grady Harp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2006

    A Very Good Book

    In a time when most commercial literature is more like pop music, it's a pleasure to read a very well written story. I could not help but see some of myself as I read this book. Roth deals with the issues of life and death in a way similiar to Hemingway. If you enjoy excellent writing that is truthful, you will enjoy Everyman. It's good to have Philip Roth as a writer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2