Customer Reviews for

Everything Bad is Good for You

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

great read

The book “Everything Bad Is Good for You” by Steven Johnson was a great read. Johnson’s introduction showed how children unknowingly learn new things from games and television. It was surprising to hear that baseball card games, and Dungeons and Dragons gave him certain...
The book “Everything Bad Is Good for You” by Steven Johnson was a great read. Johnson’s introduction showed how children unknowingly learn new things from games and television. It was surprising to hear that baseball card games, and Dungeons and Dragons gave him certain intellect that he wouldn’t have known without them. The fact that Johnson says reading doesn’t use nearly enough of the brain astounded me. I was sort of happy when he said playing video games increases parts of the brain that reading just won’t help. I definitely agree that having a visual puzzle in certain games definitely makes one think a lot more than just reading words off of a page. This is simply because you see what is happening, and hear the music letting you know the tone, and you hear the words which let you know what is going on. Playing video games definitely uses more brain power than reading does. Television, Johnson states, requires thinking and brain power to watch. Certain types of television, such as reality t.v. and action and drama, require different amounts of brain power. Action shows (Johnson brings up 24 – a great show by the way) make people think about plots, mysteries, and even characters and their relations. These different webs of information do in fact make one think which uses a good amount of the brain. Although I agree with what Johnson says about television and games, there are certain flaws I find in Johnson’s reasoning. For one, certain games have levels that just require playing through and don’t require much thought. These games do not give much evidence of supporting Johnson’s reasoning. Some television shows also are just dumb and pointless to watch. Johnson’s thinking is correct; it just depends on the games and television you choose to interact with. But overall, loved the book and highly recommend it to anyone – especially someone who thinks video games and television rot the brain.

posted by ryan_p on January 8, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Compelling and Informative.

Steven Johnson does a pretty good job of bringing another side to the table on the issue’s pertaining to the use of popular culture. Johnson’s main argument relates to the functions using video games and other forms of media, and how despite their inabilities to match ...
Steven Johnson does a pretty good job of bringing another side to the table on the issue’s pertaining to the use of popular culture. Johnson’s main argument relates to the functions using video games and other forms of media, and how despite their inabilities to match the nurturing of the brain that reading books does, they provide brain food in other ways. His first example was his baseball-dice-card game, where he had to build a successful baseball team with raw statistics and a few dice rolls. Johnson also makes mention on the potential positive effects of video games, inferring that their allowance for exploration and creation of one’s own imagination bring things that reading someone else’s written path does not provide. Johnson also has a penchant, though, for emphatically repeating the same hypothesis, in that our brains must have gotten smarter if the technology and television we take in is on a different level that that of previous generations. His main point is that it must be doing something positive, besides the obvious hand-eye coordination improvements. Overall, a compelling read, even if it is a stretch.

posted by MohammadJ on January 10, 2012

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  • Posted January 10, 2012

    Compelling and Informative.

    Steven Johnson does a pretty good job of bringing another side to the table on the issue’s pertaining to the use of popular culture. Johnson’s main argument relates to the functions using video games and other forms of media, and how despite their inabilities to match the nurturing of the brain that reading books does, they provide brain food in other ways. His first example was his baseball-dice-card game, where he had to build a successful baseball team with raw statistics and a few dice rolls. Johnson also makes mention on the potential positive effects of video games, inferring that their allowance for exploration and creation of one’s own imagination bring things that reading someone else’s written path does not provide. Johnson also has a penchant, though, for emphatically repeating the same hypothesis, in that our brains must have gotten smarter if the technology and television we take in is on a different level that that of previous generations. His main point is that it must be doing something positive, besides the obvious hand-eye coordination improvements. Overall, a compelling read, even if it is a stretch.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    What is an example of a counter claim for the book,

    What is an example of a counter claim for the book,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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