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Everything Must Change: Jesus, Global Crises, and a Revolution of Hope

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 8 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2008

    A book of hope for the Christian and others

    The premise of this book is that a part of the message of Jesus has been largely missed or ignored by the Christian church. This message is that the kingdom of God is present,available, and expected now, not just in heaven when we die. The result of taking the kingdom seriously would give hope to a world now following a suicide machine toward destruction. McLaren asks two questions. First, What are the biggest problems in the world and second, what does Jesus have to say about these global problems? The book asks us all regardless of our religious persuasions, to realize the wisdom of Jesus message for the problems of the world today. This was the most practical, instructional and inspirational book for me in 2007.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Good message though it may get lost in the words

    This book is very sobering for anyone who cares about the world around them. The amount of money spent daily on things like defense is staggering. My only criticisms of this book is that the author tends to be a little redundant, and he uses words that may go over the heads of the people who need to read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2007

    Changing Framing Stories: The Relevance of Jesus for Today

    In Brian McLaren's new book, Everything Must Change, he brings together many different resources together, both religious and secular, to offer a theo-political critique of our current society and its global crises. He then offers an alternative vision in the form of a new 'framing story' that he argues can transform the way we life. McLaren argues that 'our societies are unified, integrated, motivated, and driven by the framing stories we tell ourselves are groups' (66). He then contrasts the Christian 'framing story' (i.e. Kingdom of God) with the theocapitalist 'framing story' (i.e. suicidal machine). 'Suicide machine' is the metaphor McLaren says 'captures the way the world's most serious problems are linked in a vicious, self-reinforcing circle' (52). These suicidal systems are the following: dysfunctional prosperity system (culture of affluenza), dysfunctional security system (invisible hand of the market requires the visible fist of the military), and the dysfunctional equity system (sharing the cost and story of prosperity and equity) (55-56). 'Kingdom of God' is the metaphor McLaren uses to describe the alternative, transforming framing story that has the potential to bring life instead of death. The Kingdom of God is the divine vision of justice and peace communicated in Hebrew and Christian scripture. For McLaren, the Kingdom of God offers the best framing story: 'a story in which God provides through creation's natural systems, a story in which we acknowledge our creaturely dignity and limits within those systems, a story in which we celebrate our kinship with birds and flowers, with season and toil' (139). This story is a story where peace is achieved through collaborative efforts at 'justice, generosity, and mutual concern' (159). McLaren believes that Jesus' message and ministry challenged the dysfunctional, destructive status quo of the Roman Empire in his life. McLaren writes: 'Jesus' creative and transforming framing story invited people to change the world by disobeying old framing stories and believing a new one: a story about a loving God who, like a benevolent [leader], calls all people to live in a new way, the way of love' (274). McLaren also believes Jesus' challenge to the old story and offering of a new story is just as relevant for our lives today. For McLaren, Jesus message is so relevant because it invites us to live a new and better life right now. Not something we must wait for, but something God invites us into in our daily lives. And this better life we can live now is 'live a life dedicated to replacing the suicide machine with a sacred ecosystem, a beautiful community, an insurgency of healing and peace, a creative global family, an unterror movement of faith, hope, and love' (227). Ultimately, McLaren's book is about how Jesus' message of the Kingdom of God can offer us a way to discover hope and 'abundant life' in the midst of a world in crises.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2008

    Even Jesus must change???

    The book is granted one star for being engagingly written by a person sincere about his own personal beliefs and highly individual discoveries. But, the more I read, the more I found that the only thing that must change is the author and his views about Jesus. Jesus wants everyone to repent of their sins against God and trust in His sacrificial death on the cross to forgive their rebellion against heaven. Eternal life is offered by repentant faith in Christ. He is the Supreme Being as Son of God to be worshipped. This book is the precise opposite. Jesus is a wisdom teacher, guru, model to follow. His crucified execution was no sacrifice for sins, but a martyrdom. This book talks about Global Crisis like Al Gore would. Or Gandhi. Or Greenpeace or Sierra Club or World Health Organization, etc. The Bible talks about Global Crisis like the Apostle Paul would. The natural man is in a state of dangerous rebellion against its Creator and stands in the fearful judgment of a Righteous, Holy, Loving God. God's love is rejected all day long by billions of very religious devotees. I found no material reference to Book of Acts. If this author is on the right track, he would be tracking with the Apostles as they spread Jesus' transformative message across the Roman Empire. Not even close. Paul and Peter in Acts declare that everyone must repent of wickedness and turn from rebels against Jesus to worshippers. Only then can everything change in the world. The author of this book has his hope in everything must change on earth among pagans, idolaters and Jesus-rejectors. Historic Christianity must change to embrace his global restoration philosophy. The Bible must change. Jesus must change. 'Aren't you erroneously mistaken because you don't understand the Scriptures or the Power of God?' That's Jesus' question today.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted January 19, 2010

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    Posted January 13, 2010

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    Posted May 4, 2009

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    Posted June 18, 2011

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    Posted March 6, 2011

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