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Eve's Seed: Biology, the Sexes, and the Course of History

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2002

    An End to the War of the Sexes?

    I think not, but what a wonderful read this book is! Strips away so many ingrained misconceptions held since childhood. For anyone remotely interested in humanity's future pick up this book and read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2001

    A New Historical Slant on Male vs Female

    'Eve's Seed', by Robert McElvaine is a fascinating slant on the male-female 'us vs. them' distortion. That distortion-- male always 'on top' -- still haunts male-female relations even today. McElvaine is a historian who frames the 'male-dominated' culture of the past 8 to 10 thousand years by defining what he calls the 'Conception Misconception'. That is, the notion put forward for thousands of years (and still accepted as gospel by millions of people even today) that the male 'seed' accounts for 100% of the 'life' of a child and that the female is simply the 'soil' in which the male seed is planted, then nurtured until birth. From that premise, McElvaine shows how males felt it was their right--even their duty--to claim ownership of and assert dominance over females, over their children, and even nature itself. It's worth reading if only to enjoy his definitions of what he calls 'notawoman', also known as the identity associated today with 'super macho'. Highly recommended reading for anyone interested in seeing a more cooperative, less competitive culture, especially as it pertains to the male-female 'power balance'. (Not recommended reading, therefore, for anyone who still thinks wives should 'obey' their husbands.) retired professor from Memphis

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2000

    A Major Revelation

    This work is profoundly transforming - especially for those curious about the universe and their place in it. Ever want to know about the origin of human values? Does it ever cross your mind that for more than 99% of human existence we've been in an environment drastically different from the one outside your window? Do you wonder whether this has any consequences for human interaction? Do you ever wonder why men and women seem so different in their emotional chemistry? Do you ever sit back and wonder who was right, the John-Locke/Margaret Mead-nurture-is-everything camp or the Edward Wilson/Richard Dawkins-nature-is-everything crowd? If you do, read this book. If you don't, read this book. Not only is it a work of major insight, but the author's prose and wordplay make it a joy to read. 5 stars all around.

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