Customer Reviews for

Evolution

Average Rating 4
( 31 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Not with a bang, but with a whimper

This was a great read. There were a few graphic descriptions that might have been better had they been less so, but overall it was a spectacularly depressing book and you would certainly hope that we, as a species, don't go down the road envisioned here.

posted by Anonymous on June 17, 2004

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

This book had me until the end

I was really enjoying this book until I reached the end. The idea of devolution is nothing new, but it was a disappointment. Baxter's writing is sometimes stilted (in my opinion) as well. It was a worthwhile read, though, but not in the top 10 books I've read lately. I'...
I was really enjoying this book until I reached the end. The idea of devolution is nothing new, but it was a disappointment. Baxter's writing is sometimes stilted (in my opinion) as well. It was a worthwhile read, though, but not in the top 10 books I've read lately. I'd recommend Robert Sawyer's 'Hominids' and 'Humans' over this book.

posted by Anonymous on July 2, 2003

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  • Posted March 29, 2014

    This book stayed with me a long time after I read it... As a ro

    This book stayed with me a long time after I read it...

    As a rollicking science fiction tale, this book may leave the reader scratching their head. It is more a series of interrelated short stories and vignettes given from the viewpoint of creatures stretching back in time from the first tiny mammals to survive the impact which took out the dinosaurs, to the present, to the distant future when our planet is trashed and our sun has expanded to re-absorb the Earth.

    What this story -does- do more clearly than all the snoozer science textbooks we were forced to read in high school and college is take the various critical turning points of evolution, when some new adaptation or trait emerged to help our species evolve into the species we know of as homo sapiens today. And each of those vignettes is interesting, fully explained, and will leave the lay-reader with a thorough understanding of how we ended up where we are today.

    And then Baxter journeys into our future...

    With the same thoroughness, Baxter takes us through various plausibilities, extrapolating the choices we are making as a species today to ignore environmental degradation, civil unrest, aggression, and carries our species forward into the distant future, building upon the framework he built in the first half of the book to get us where we are evolutionarily speaking today, to show us where we are headed in the future ... and it is not pretty.

    4 Evolutionary Monkeys

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    deep epic look at evolution and devolution

    In 2031, the latest save the earth ecology conference is ironically being held in Darwin, Australia. The global climatic destruction threatens Homo Sapiens¿ domination of the planet and the nearby orbs. While forests burn out of control and pollution holds sway, the enormous Rabaul Volcano erupts. Mankind¿s reign seems nearly through while the Martian robots have now replicated themselves. Terrorists attack the conference as attendees discuss the battles for supremacy through the ages with the victors goes the spoils until primates evolve during the Tertiary Period. Ultimately apes leave the trees for life on the ground until they build high rises. Now in the year 2031, Earth is on the brink with the volcano being the final straw to end humanity¿s dominion. Mars appears as the next evolutionary step as machines that replicate establish colonies throughout the galaxy. This book reads more like short story vignettes than a novel, but fans of Stephen Baxter and anyone who relishes a deep look at evolution and devolution will want to read this epic. Mr. Baxter is at his best when he describes prehistorical winners and losers and speculates on the future devolution of the primate on earth. Though another form of evolutionary supremacy, the robot revolution seems to belong in a more science fiction realm than the speculative fiction employed throughout EVOLUTION. Another triumph for Mr. Baxter who has evolved into best-selling specie that Darwin would have enjoyed reading the author¿s works. Harriet Klausner

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    Posted November 10, 2011

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    Posted July 20, 2011

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    Posted October 27, 2008

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    Posted October 27, 2008

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