Customer Reviews for

Eyes of Heisenberg

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted October 19, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Peering Through the Eyes of Uncertinty

    The Heisenberg Uncertinty Principle states that the more precisely you know one value, the less precisely you know the other. Thus begins a concept for a masterpeice of sci-fi, and a cornerstone of the Frank Herbert legacy.<BR/>Civilization is dominated by a group of genetically perfect Optimen, incapable of feeling emotion. The current set of Optimen are the Tuyere: Calapine, Nourse, and Schruille. Society is not permitted to produce children among themselves, but a handful of parents are selected to donate their gametes for genetic manipulation by specially trained engineers. The law states that the parents are able to watch the manipulation of their embryo, but not to interfere. When Harvey and Lizabeth decide to evoke the law, their embryo is altered structurally by an invisible outside force, giving it the powers of an Optiman. Rather than destroying it, however, the engineer in charge destroys the record of the operation, and preserves the embryo. The Optimen furiously attempt to locate and destroy the embryo, slowly sliding down a cycle of human emotion and bloodlust that eventually drives them insane.<BR/>It is interesting to note the word "cyborg" that occurs frequently in the novel, leading me to suspect that Herbert was responsible for the creation of that term. Cyborgs would later become quite significant in the 1980s science-fictional cyberpunk movement, in works such as Do Robots Dream of Mechanical Sheep? -- more commonly known as Blade Runner. Nonetheless, this novel remains a classic, even among the greatest of sci-fi, pondering such tantalizing questions as, "What happens when the gods go insane?" "Where does humanity began and how does it end?" And, most importantly, "Can humanity become its own god?" Well, I think it can. And it should. And it starts by thinking for oneself.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2003

    twin of dune

    a great book it touched me deep almost as deep as the dune series smaller than some of his books it was still great you should definetly read this outstanding, phenominal book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Eyes of Heisenberg

    Classic Frank Herbert at his best, a very short story based in the future (of course) and what would happen if humanity found immortality. Inevitably only some could obtain the immortal status and they ruled the "folk" from their private city. The Folk were worker humans, specifically bred to do their tasks and nothing more. Only select Folk were given permits to breed and then the embryos were subjected to "cutting" by a genetic engineer to keep the population exactly how the immortals "optiman" wanted them. Only on select embryos was another Optiman allowed to be born and raised. These select few were taken from the Folk to be trained and raised with the Optimen. Of course some humans through accidental cuts fell outside the Optimens plans and create a challenge to them. The path the resistance takes, and how they are able to bring down the Optimen is a fun, quick read. Highly recommend for anyone who enjoys science fiction works.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2006

    Rather poor

    Somehow, after reading the Dune series all the other Herbert books seem to be sort of experimental drafts of the great and intriguing exploration of the possible human society set in Dune. The eyes of Heisenberg is no exception, you can almost draw the parallels to the Dune serial. Now this isnt a bad thing by itself, but the character development is way too shallow and the story although promising at the beginning, doesnt really go anywhere. Skip this one. Read Dune if you havent already.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2006

    Glad I picked it up

    I bought this book on a whim- I had recently been studying the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle in school and saw this in Frank Herbert's section at the bookstore. Not a bad book by any measure. I wish it was longer and a little more expansive on some of the ideas, but the plot development was very good and Herbert is very gifted writer. I give it three stars because the last few chapters were a little confusing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2004

    Great read!!!

    If you enjoyed 'Starship Troopers,' by Heinlein, you'll enjoy this ecological sci-fi thriller by Frank Herbert. Just give it a chance--it's a bit slow in the beginning, but gives the same type of thrills as the Heinlein book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1