Customer Reviews for

Farewell to Manzanar

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

I would read this book because it talks a little girl getting mistreated,its sad but it's still a god book by a long shot.

Book title and author Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, James D. Houston
Title of review: Farwell to Manzanar
Number of stars (1 to 5): 5












Farwell to Manzanar is a really good book. It's about this girl who doesn't know what Pearl Harbor is. She wa...
Book title and author Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, James D. Houston
Title of review: Farwell to Manzanar
Number of stars (1 to 5): 5












Farwell to Manzanar is a really good book. It's about this girl who doesn't know what Pearl Harbor is. She was only seven years in 1942 when her family uprooted her from the family to go to Manzanar internment camp. When she went to the camp there were one-thousand other Japanese people there. But there was a lot of cool stuff there including cheerleaders, boy scouts, and even more. So I wonder how bad it feels like to grow up behind barbed wire fence. The little girl did like to listen to the band sing 'don't fence me in.' The little girl is so beautiful, she is so smart and I think she is the smartest little girl I know. After she decided that she liked the camp she made friends and had a pretty decent life. One thing I don't like is the camp was in the United States.

posted by dustin_d_wv on October 1, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Book Review Outline Book title and author: Farewell to Manzanar

Book Review Outline
Book title and author: Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston & James D. Houston
Title of review: Farewell to Manzanar Review
Number of stars (1 to 5): 3.5

Introduction
Jeanne looks back on her life in Manzanar concentration ...
Book Review Outline
Book title and author: Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston & James D. Houston
Title of review: Farewell to Manzanar Review
Number of stars (1 to 5): 3.5

Introduction
Jeanne looks back on her life in Manzanar concentration camp. She finally voices the thoughts she has kept to herself all this time. I thought the book was interesting because it describes life in a concentration camp through the eyes of a seven year old.
Description and summary of main points
Jeannie Wakatsuki was exiled into a concentration camp as a little girl. She did not understand what was happening, as she was only seven years old. She tells what life was like inside the gates of Manzanar and what life was like when they were forced into the outside world. She also recalls a visit to Manzanar as an adult.
Evaluation
In the beginning of the book, the plot is jumble and confusing. The characters are portrayed very well and are completely life- like. The settings are described accurately and detailed. As Jeanne grows older, she comes to realize the meaning of Manzanar. This book voices Jeanne’s thoughts and opinions of Manzanar and life very well.
Conclusion
This book shows life at Manzanar through the eyes of young Jeannie. She tells her thoughts as a child, teenager, and an adult. Overall, it is a very good book and I enjoyed it.
Your final review
Though the plot is jumbled at first, you start to understand the book better once you read farther into it.

posted by rebeccak280 on May 24, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    Book Review Outline Book title and author: Farewell to Manzanar

    Book Review Outline
    Book title and author: Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston & James D. Houston
    Title of review: Farewell to Manzanar Review
    Number of stars (1 to 5): 3.5

    Introduction
    Jeanne looks back on her life in Manzanar concentration camp. She finally voices the thoughts she has kept to herself all this time. I thought the book was interesting because it describes life in a concentration camp through the eyes of a seven year old.
    Description and summary of main points
    Jeannie Wakatsuki was exiled into a concentration camp as a little girl. She did not understand what was happening, as she was only seven years old. She tells what life was like inside the gates of Manzanar and what life was like when they were forced into the outside world. She also recalls a visit to Manzanar as an adult.
    Evaluation
    In the beginning of the book, the plot is jumble and confusing. The characters are portrayed very well and are completely life- like. The settings are described accurately and detailed. As Jeanne grows older, she comes to realize the meaning of Manzanar. This book voices Jeanne’s thoughts and opinions of Manzanar and life very well.
    Conclusion
    This book shows life at Manzanar through the eyes of young Jeannie. She tells her thoughts as a child, teenager, and an adult. Overall, it is a very good book and I enjoyed it.
    Your final review
    Though the plot is jumbled at first, you start to understand the book better once you read farther into it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2008

    Okay book

    In the book Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuk Houston and James D. Houston, Jeanne is a young, seven year old, girl who was sent with her family to live at Manzanar interment camp in 1942 with 10 thousand other Japanese Americans. This is a true story of a spirited Japanese American family's attempt to survive the indignities of forced detention. The authors do a good job of engaging the reader by having a significant amount of details in the text. For example, on page 76, it says, 'Another nineteen-year-old died five days later.' These details help you understand the story a little bit more. To me, the details are really good and the best thing the authors can do to make the book more interesting. However, I didn't quite understand the beginning of the book until i read the rest of the book. I think that whoever enjoys true stories would really enjoy this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    The book Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and Ja

    The book Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston is an engaging, thought-provoking memoir about what was is like to grow up behind a barbed wire fence during the time of World War II. Seven year old Japanese-American Jeanne Wakatsuki was living in San Pedro Harbor, California when Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1941. Not long after this tragic event, the Wakatsuki family and 10 thousand other Japanese families got sent to Japanese internment camps. Fortunately, the whole Wakatsuki family got sent to Manzanar Internment Camp. Jeanne and her family had to learn to survive in the terrible living conditions. Although Jeanne didn’t understand much about what was going on in the world at her time in Manzanar, the time she spent there completely changed herself and her life. Decades after Jeanne left Manzanar, she finally found her voice and decided to speak up about the four long years she spent at the Japanese internment camp. 




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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Learninglfull

    Farewell to Manzanar is an exhilarating book to read! This book is non-fiction and very vivid. In my opinion this book will be suitable for anyone. Farwell to Manzanar is about a young Japanese girl with her family and her childhood through Pearl Harbor. It contains her family's frustrations and raging moments that will keep you on the edge of your seat. This nail biting story also includes her school life-boys, friendships, sports, etc. This motivating book is similar to what happened to over 110,000 Japanese family's during the mid 1940's at various camps throughout the United States.


    The main character in this tale is about a 7 year old Japanese girl Jeanne Wakatsuki, growing up in the early and mid 1940's in a concentration camp in California, and her getting her life back together again after they leave the camp. Other important characters in this story are papa, mama, and Radine. You will read that papa is very strict and proud about his family's Japanese descent. Mama is very kind and considerate while Radine, Jeanne's first real friend in her life, is brave for what she does throughout the story for Jeanne against the racial people in their community. Jeanne is aroused to get out in the real world again since the any years at Manzanar. Manzanar was where thousands of Japanese and other oriental family's such as Indian, Korean, etc. were forced to move into for years of their life.

    People can learn a valuable lesson from this book. Farewell to Manzanar is something that not even words can express! To find out what it's really like to learn the lives of a Japanese family going through a U.S tragedy and their experiences through the years, you'll just have to find out by yourself and read this book.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    It was an alright book but it definitely wasn't my favorite.

    Farewell to Manzanar by James D. Houston and Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston is a nonfiction novel that is written in first person. This novel was published in 1973 by Houghton Mifflin. It took place in 1941 in the internment camps that the Japanese people had to live in. A young girl of the age of seven years old and named Jeanne Wakatsuki was the main character. She had to live in multiple places such as Terminal Island, Ocean Park in California, Boyle Heights in Los Angeles, Owens Valley, Manzanar, and Long Beach throughout the book. The book was pretty good, but was very hard to understand.

    Jeanne Wakatsuki had a very tough life. She went through a lot before she got to actually enjoy her life. She got made fun of by the Caucasians and was slightly scared of her own race. The author had a way of making you feel like you were right there through all the family struggles. She makes you feel very upset at the end of the day because you are treated so well and they were treated so badly. Her own dad said, "I'm going to sell you to the china-man," meaning that he was going to give them away. Her father was always drunk and her mother was always being beaten by her father.

    This book really inspired me to give the people that had to live in the interment camps sympathy. Jeanne had no clue she was being treated so badly till she grew a little older. When the mother said, "Woody, we can't live like this, animals live like this," it was very upsetting to know that they lived that badly. I had to look up many of the words that used. They were so medically defined that it was kind of hard to understand what they were talking about. Also, it was very detailed about the clothing and camps. I really liked the book except for those few complaints.

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  • Posted September 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Sayonara, Manzanar

    This story is about an American born Japanese girl named Jeanne and her family. Due simply to their Japanese ancestry, they were imprisoned in an internment camp in the Owens Valley during WWII, even though Jeanne and her siblings were American citizens by birth. My favorite character in the novella is Jeanne's sister-in-law, Chizu. She is married to Jeanne's older brother, Woody. He is the second eldest son of the family, who was drafted into the 442nd before Manzanar closed. At the time of his deployment, Chizu is a young soldier's wife with two small children to care for, and the only family she is surrounded by is that of her husband. I cannot fathom how difficult life must have been for her to bear.

    I have been to the war memorials and museum in Hiroshima, Japan. At the museum I watched a video that detailed the horrors of the war and the affects of the radiation the atomic bomb had afterwards. The monument to Sakura and the thousand paper cranes holds testament to the devastating affects that lasted for many decades after the war ended. Jeanne's story, however, is the flip side of the coin. It spins the interwoven tales of the 110,000 Japanese in America that were affected by the same war. The confusion Japanese-Americans felt just after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the lack of privacy in the camps such as Manzanar, the prejudice faced after the camps were closed, and many other aspects of Japanese-American life is touched on in Manzanar. I have felt ostracized by my appearance before as well, and have experienced the same feelings Jeanne described of wanting to fit in, but feeling unalterably different. Her story is one that can be related to on many levels-not just by the people who shared those same moments in history.

    I like the concept behind Farewell to Manzanar, and applaud its valiant purpose. However, it is a little watered down for anyone intently interested in the subject and people involved. Its concise nature is best for students in middle school or basic high school English classes. If it wasn't geared toward such a broad audience, I would suggest adding more details to Jeanne's tale.

    I would recommend this novella most to the young relatives of the people who were actually in the internment camps. I think it would lend them a better understanding of their relative's past, their history, and a glimmering pinprick of insight into the vastness of what "Manzanar" encompasses. I hope books like this one will help humanity as a whole not repeat our greatest, and most devastating, mistakes.

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  • Posted October 31, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Deprivation of personal freedom

    Farewell to Manzanar is about the living conditions in the internment of Japanese Americans during World War Two. Based on personal recollections, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston relates her story as a 7 year old forced to live in a camp along her family. Farewell to Manzanar is a true story. It is also a web of stories of her, her father, her family, and the multitude of paths that led away from the experience of internment. <BR/> Manzanar was a community in California during World War Two. Its purpose was to house thousands of Japanese American internees. The Wakatsuki family is one of the first to arrive at this unpleasant and humiliating place. Manzanar becomes Jeanne¿s way of life in which she struggles to adapt. For her father it was essentially the end of his life. Not only does Jeanne struggle to fit in with her peers but it is a battle with her father to remain loyal to her Japanese traditions. <BR/> Farewell to Manzanar is a story of fear, pride, humiliation, and confusion. It is the journey of a young girl to find herself and attempt to fit in. I found the book to be very interesting and informational. I had never learned about these topics. I have been taught about World War Two and the attack on Pearl Harbor but never in depth about these camps. I hope schools will emphasize more on this topic. This book is very vivid and it allows readers to capture the pain in the experiences of this community.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2008

    pretty good

    In the book Farwell to Manzanar the authors do a pretty good job of engaging the reader because they give a lot of detail and they talk about interesting things. Alought at some points during the book it geys a little boring, but usuall after a boring part there is an iteresting part. So in the end the authors do do a pretty good job of engaging the reader. Also, in the book I liked how, while the family was at the camp, it told a lot about what they did in detail and told about their feelings. At points in the book though I got confused. It was confusing when they told about the camp abd how it was set up because I could not quite picture it in my head. The people that I think might enjoy this book would be people whowant to know in detail what happened in World War II to the Japanese and the hard times that they went through.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2006

    Awesome Book!

    Book: Farewell to Manzanar Author: Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston Throughout the summer I got a chance to read a wonderful book titled Farewell to Manzanar. By just examining the cover of the book it might not seem that interesting, but once you start reading it will be hard to put it down. Farewell to Manzanar is a two hundred and three page book about a Japanese-American family living in camps, during World War Two. This biography really changed my thinking about the Japanese-Americans during the war, because I used to think that no matter where they live in the United States or in Japan they were still guilty of the loss of many lives. I know that I was wrong. Not all Japanese- Americans even favored a side during the war. They were regular people trapped in the middle of two countries fighting. They knew the consequences of what could happen if either side won they just wanted peace. The level of difficulty for this book is very low, which makes it go by even faster. I know that once you start reading this book it will be hard to stop. I sure did like this book, and I hope that you will read and enjoy it too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2006

    What do I think about this book........

    Coming from my opinion, I say that this book was very difficult for me. I say that because in this book it has a lot of various settings into where this family resigns. Also, I really didn¿t have any interest in this book compared to other books that I¿ve read in the past. The main point of this book is about a Japanese family who lives in Los Angeles and the father of that family experiences different points of views towards his life and his family. This book contains twenty-two chapters and the author of this book is Jeanne Watatsuki Houston. If she is one of our favorite authors I advise you to read this book and also if you like challenging books. If you are not interested in difficult books or if you think that twenty-two chapters is a lot for you, I think that this book is not required for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2005

    Good story about the Japanese Internment Camps during WWII.

    This book is good, but it does jump around a bit. It is an easy read & not very long.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2005

    An Okay book

    I sort of liked this book. It kept my interest and was very easy to read, but it just wasn't... outstanding. It was sad to see how Jeanne was treated and how her race was prejudiced, and it's hard for people that aren't oriental or any other race to comprehend what they went through in the 1940s. Overall, it was well written and pretty good, but it just wasn't excellent. Still good, though.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2005

    Farewell to manzanar

    I choose to read this book because it talks about war. I also wanted read this book because is base on a true story. When I first started reading the book it was get in interesting because Japanese ships were coming so I thought the war was going to start, but nothing happened. As keep reading it started to get boring. Then it started to get interesting. That happens when the family went to a concentration camp. There the Japanese family faced discrimination. A few things that I like are that it shows how hard was to live back on those days for Japanese families. I also was interesting in how school was back then and how is now. Even when the book doesn¿t show a lot of action, as I thought it would be on it, it was ok. One of the interesting parts was when every body changes their attitude. I also like the scene when the family is moving and they are trying to sale their staff for not a lot of money. I recommend this book to the people who like to know some facts about world war one or some body who like wars. I¿ll give this a 7 out of 10 because it had a bit action and drama. Even when I give this book a 7 out of 10 I like the book. It was ok, it will be better for middle school students. After all this the book was easy to read, it didn¿t have the much of weird words.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2005

    Farewell to Manzanar

    I did not like the book a lot but it was wrong what people did to their enimes during the war and that is what caught my eye in the book. I would not reccomend this book because it is not interesting. All of the people in my reading group at school did not exactly understand the book as much as a more interesting book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2004

    Farewell to Manzanar

    I'm a high school sophomore and I chose to read this book for my law class (to discuss racial discrimination) because it seemed pretty easy. As an Asian American, I can relate to the author's experiences and I understand how sometimes people can be discriminating to Asian Americans. The book was okay though it didn't have much dialogue and action. I would recommend this book for middle school students who are interested in World War II.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2004

    it tired me out

    i never like storys about the War and how they survived and this story didn't change my oppinion. in the beginging when i read the frist couple of pages i did seem a bit interesting but as the story went on it seemed it took me longer and longer to finnish the chapter.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2003

    The Onli Way You Can Experience The Fun and the Reality Of This Book Is By Reading IT!!!!!!!!!!

    it is a very nicely and intrestingly written book. it's about how a family's life suffer which is reality every family lifes suffers at one time or another so it will b really great if you chek this boook out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2003

    pretty good book

    This book was very interesting. It gave many details on what happened back then and what they went throught growing up. I would assume many people in other countries could probably relate to this book. Being isolated with so many people and having different views and rules could be hard. It was a good book I would recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2002

    Farewell to Mazanar

    Farewell to Mazanar was a well written book told through the eyes of a young girl. I rated this book the way I did because although it wasn't the worst I've read, it wasn't the best. The main character seemed rather clueless, or uninformed. Like she didn't know what was going on. It was a good story, but little slow moving. This is just my opinion, I tend ot enjoy action packed books in most cases. For people who enjoy books about World War II, I strongly recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2001

    Farewell to Manzanar

    I think that this was a very informing book. i liked it although it would get boring at times.

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