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Fat Land: How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

A Great Read

Fat Land is everything a good piece of non-fiction should be: Thoroughly researched, tightly written, pointed yet compassionate and-here's the bonus-executed with a wonderful sense of humor. Even those not interested in America's fat epidemic will not be able to put thi...
Fat Land is everything a good piece of non-fiction should be: Thoroughly researched, tightly written, pointed yet compassionate and-here's the bonus-executed with a wonderful sense of humor. Even those not interested in America's fat epidemic will not be able to put this book down. As one friend observed, "You'll lose ten pounds just by reading it!"

posted by Anonymous on January 26, 2003

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Highly Recommended - check it out!

In the nonfiction novel, “Fat Land; How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World,” by Greg Critser, it argues the specific explanations for America’s obesity issues. Critser’s book offers a look at the various causes of why the energy balance in America has grow...
In the nonfiction novel, “Fat Land; How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World,” by Greg Critser, it argues the specific explanations for America’s obesity issues. Critser’s book offers a look at the various causes of why the energy balance in America has grown to be so lopsided. Critser conveys a complete assessment of the farming, governmental, societal, and financial specifics that have funded America’s obesity epidemic. Although most believe that the weight problem in America has increased due to the amount of fast food and burger joints, Critser clarifies the real issues that occurred before the fast food industry epidemic. In one of the main chapters in his book, Critser shows his audience that the real trouble came from the economy. Businesses and food manufacturers had been continuously losing money and assumed that “corn syrup” was no different than the sugar used in most food products. This supposition lead to high fructose levels in the majority of our nation’s foods. Critser did a remarkable job clarifying the thought process of the food producers and how they presumed that this new type of sweetener was appropriate for America. He also described how this modification of ingredients soon backfired. The high fructose corn syrup in America’s food was exceptionally harmful and caused the obesity rate to increase. Along with Critser’s well-studied proofs on the economic mistakes of America’s government, he also pointed out the other main error of our countries decisions which lead towards an obese country. The food manufacturers learned “value meals” and “supersizing”. Fast food restaurants observed the profitability- if they served high profit drinks and low profit burgers- was immense and was the greatest thing that could happen for their business. Besides that, “supersizing” became particularly popular among the residents of our country; tripling the serving size of a standard McDonald’s meal saved companies money and presented the consumers more for their dollar. Soon America was supersized and businesses attempted to compete with McDonalds marketing tricks to receive more business. Due to this entire theory of supersizing, our country has from then on had an exceptionally challenging time consuming healthy and well portioned meals. Critser’s in-depth justification for America’s faults indicated to his readers the very real epidemic our country is in and the steps America needs to take to repair this problem are significant.

posted by Bizz1 on January 8, 2012

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  • Posted November 4, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I didn't enjoy this book--too "formal" for my taste. Left me wanting.

    I thought this book was exciting since it's less than 200 pages, which is about equal to my interest in the topic. Turns out to be 176 pages that feel like 1760 pages. Reading this book is a lot like reading a report in a medical journal. It was dry, stuffy, long, and boring. Recommended only for people who are VERY into this topic; I was disappointed.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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