Customer Reviews for

Fat White Vampire Blues

Average Rating 4.5
( 17 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 19 of 17 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2004

    A great new take on vampires.

    Vampires. New Orleans. Jazz. The French Quarter. Sounds like the makings of an Agatha Longr.....er, I mean Anne Rice novel. You couldn't be more wrong, or more entertained. Andrew Fox has put a fun, interesting and wholly logical spin on the vampire mythos. This book was a really amusing and entertaining read. You get the 'good guys' - Jules Duchon(the title character), Maureen (Jules' love of his life) and Doodlebug (Jules' gender-bernder sidekick). Then you have the 'bad guys' - Malice X and his posse of fairly newly turned black vampires aiming to drive Jules out of the 'Big Easy'. Adventure,comedy and tragedy(with some bloodsucking thrown in)are all in store for you here.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2003

    Humor and social commentary

    A good novel can be read on more than one level and ¿Fat White Vampire Blues¿ is a good example of this. On one level, the novel is the humorous story Jules Duchon, the eponymous fat white vampire as he makes his way through the nightlife of New Orleans. This is a New Orleans that residents will recognize, not the Mardi Gras/swamp infested dreamland of movies. On another level, it is the story of a white working class man dragged into this century¿s New South. After all, Jules is several generations removed from our current society norms. The insularity of New Orleans has allowed him to ignore the growing acceptance of Black and gay culture. He has ¿exceptions¿, friends and acquaintances, but his world has not forced him to confront their meaning in his life. The few months of this book compel him to reevaluate who his friends are and who can be trusted.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2003

    A Vampire Book for Those Who Don't Think They Like Vampire Books

    Fat White Vampire Blues, by Andrew Fox, is not necessarily the type of fiction I usually pick up, but the book came highly recommended to me. Usually, I would be prone to ¿women¿s fiction,¿ such as things that might make the ¿Opra Book List.¿ The moment I picked up the book, however, I found it engrossing from page one. Jules Duchon, native New Orleans vampire¿a 450-lb, working class, underachiever¿is not the kind of character that one might expect to like, to sympathize with, to agree with, to think of as moral, to think of as deep¿but Andrew Fox makes the reader feel all of these things about Jules. When the book begins, Jules is a very large, rather oafish, free-range type of vampire¿one who hunts for victims on the street, rather than one who operates some sort of racket to receive blood. (Other vampire characters in the book have devised ingenious ways to receive easy blood donations on a regular basis without hunting and killing victims.) Jules has been in a slump of sorts over the past decade¿his world is changing; his neighborhood is going downhill; his favorite nostalgic places are disappearing; he lost his easy-riding job with the coroner¿s office; and he has lost touch with his long-time and only real love. Jules does not seem to mind his existence, stagnant as it is. The book takes off right away to pull the carpet out from underneath Jules, when ¿Malice X,¿ a truly evil, sharp-dressing, black vampire, threatens Jules to stop preying on black victims, or else¿. Jules¿ journey to save his claim on his territory forces him to confront his (also morbidly obese) ex-lover, Maureen, who seemingly detests him for his obesity and his lack of suavity; and his old vampiric side-kick, Duddlebug, from whom Jules has been estranged since Duddlebug became a cross-dresser. Throughout his journey, Jules is forced to confront his feelings about his childhood Catholic church-going education, his feelings on his own vampirism, his feelings about his weight and obesity in general; his prejudices against homosexuals (cross dressers); and his true feelings about racism, while leading the reader through an extremely accurate description of New Orleans, with all its ups and downs. Jules is a character that grows (emotionally) and brings the reader along with him on his journey of self-exploration. All of the book¿s characters, both main and supporting, are completely engrossing and real. The dialogue rings true with each character, and dialects are accurate. The book is very fast moving and hard to put down, with each ingenious plot twist spelled out in believable ways, all based on strong foundations laid down from the beginning of the book. For those of you who would not normally consider reading vampire or genre fiction, I advise you to put your prejudices and fears aside. Fat White Vampire Blues reads like mainstream fiction, with lovable characters, believable plot twists, snappy dialogue, and tons of New Orleans lore. Although the lessons Jules learns are serious and the reader takes Jules seriously, lots of laughs are scattered throughout the book. Anyone who has spent time in New Orleans will marvel at the accurate portrayal of the City. Those who have not spent time there will be forced to wonder if such a dichotomy of a place could truly exist. (I am a native New Orleanian, and, believe me, the place is as described!) I would recommend this book to a wide range of readers, from those who like vampire genre, to Sci-Fi/fantasy/horror fans, to plot/action-oriented readers, to readers who will only read a book that is character based. I love this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2004

    The title really got my interest.

    I really enjoyed the book, although I almost stop reading it during the first meal that Jules had. That first part seemed a bit slow moving, but I am glad I picked up the book again. I couldn't put it down after that, and thought it even ended on an unusual, yet seemingly appropriate note. I also appreciated that it wasn't as bloody and gruesome as some vampire books can be. Just a story about a real vampire in the real world, with real life problems.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2004

    Comedy and drama

    This book was by far one of the best I have read in a while. A batch of comedy followed up by a bout of drama. Jules has the ability to make you roll over with laughter while reaching for the kleenex. It also focused on racisim in the world today and pinpointed a lot of problems that we take for granted. This is a great book and I'd suggest spending money on it. I really hope the author creates more enjoyable books such as this one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2003

    Very humorous and twisted!

    The problems that Jules faces are pretty much unheard of in the mass of vampire stories that I've seen. Jules has real world problems, such as weighing over 450 lbs and not being able to stop himself from enjoying a fattening treat. Andrew is a funny funny man, and if you want something better than run of the mill, then you should check this book out, and look for the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2003

    Fat White Vampire Blues

    I adored this book! First of all, it was tremendously fun to read, and in this day and age, we can use all of the fun we can get. I also found it to be one of those delicious books that are hard to resist having just a little bit more of, sort of like eating a pint of Hagen Daz, (¿I¿ll just read one more chapter¿¿) But this sense of fun went further than the book being just a good read, for the character of Jules Duchon had a sense of authenticity where in no time I truly felt like I not only knew him, liked him, and believed in him, but also wanted to spend time with him in his beloved New Orleans, (a city I once lived in and whose essence I felt Andrew Fox captured perfectly in all of its exotic funkiness.) I laughed at Jules¿ foibles, commiserated with his set backs, shared in his triumphs, and ultimately, perhaps because there is a little bit of all of us in Jules (no pun intended,) walked away not only knowing him as an unforgettable character in a book, but also as a very human, albeit undead, friend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2003

    Fat White Vampire Blues

    I adored this book! First of all, it was tremendously fun to read, and in this day and age, we can use all of the fun we can get. I also found it to be one of those delicious books that are hard to resist having just a little bit more of, sort of like eating a pint of Hagen Daz, (¿I¿ll just read one more chapter¿¿) But this sense of fun went further than the book being just a good read, for the character of Jules Duchon had a sense of authenticity where in no time I truly felt like I not only knew him, liked him, and believed in him, but also wanted to spend time with him in his beloved New Orleans, (a city I once lived in and whose essence I felt Andrew Fox captured perfectly in all of its exotic funkiness.) I laughed at Jules¿ foibles, commiserated with his set backs, shared in his triumphs, and ultimately, perhaps because there is a little bit of all of us in Jules (no pun intended,) walked away not only knowing him as an unforgettable character in a book, but also as a very human, albeit undead, friend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2003

    Fantastic stories within stories

    I liked this book more than any vampire book I've ever read. I've read the classics and a few modern ones, and they all had the problem of being a bit too serious about their subject. Fat White Vampire Blues is realistic (within its own fantasy world rules) and not afraid to laugh at itself. This makes the book not only funny but tedium-proof. Catch-22 is the best comparison, along with One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Each of the characters has an interesting background that somehow finds its way into the main story. I particularly like the friendship Jules develops with 'other' animals, and his love of jazz, and his way-overweight girlfriend, Maureen. This book is funny, a little bit but tolerably gross, and easy to get lost in on a rainy weekend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2003

    weird and wonderful undead doings

    'Fat White Vampire Blues', the new novel by Andrew Fox, is probably one of the strangest books you could read this year, as well as one of the most enjoyable. It's mandatory viewing for any fan of the vampire/horror genre in general, and a good dietary supplement for those whose summer reading is seriously lacking in pulpy, off-beat fun. The fat white vampire in question is one Jules Duchon, New Orleans born, bred and undead. And his blues is this: too much good livin'. Too many years of feeding off the fat-rich blood that the veins of the Big Easy have to offer have taken their toll on poor Jules: he now weighs in at a staggering 450 pounds, & is worried he's contracting vampire diabetes. He's definitely not the man (thing? undead fiend?) he used to be, but still, the scariest fate awaiting him is that of a low-fat diet--until Malice X enters his (un)life. Malice is the street-smart, upstart and decidedly buff black vampire that demands that Jules curb his feeding habits to 'whites only', or face the consequences. Those consequences are what make up the bulk of our bulky anti-hero's off-kilter journey of self-discovery and liberation--one that seems to delight in shuckin' and jivin' the reader in all sorts of unlikely and very rewarding directions. Sure, this is Jules' story, but the real star of the show here is New Orleans itself. Its' fading locales and details are lovingly evoked by Fox in all their delicate, eccentric hot-house glory, and the rhythms of that town define the novel's rhythms: it is at turns funky, obtuse, ornery and whimsical. Jules can't bear to change his ways anymore than he can bear the thought of leaving his home town--no matter what Malice X threatens. One of the bittersweet notes this novel hits is not of Jules' battle with the new flashy hip-hop culture Malice represents (as opposed to the old school French Quarter jazz Jules and Fox obviously loves so much), but that of another, undefined vampiric source: the strip-malling of America, the encroachment of redundancy, where local names are replaced by brand names, and every place is the same, no matter where you are. Through Jules' eyes, we see New Orleans slowly falling victim to this self-replicating virus--its¿ individuality wiped clean bit by bit, block by block. Jules is wiser than we are. He knows a bled-dry victim when he sees one. We simply line up to become one. Old Jules also represents a big, flaming loogie in the face of the whole Anne Rice aristocratic undead pantheon---Fox is practically shouting, 'Hey, lady! Take a look at what a real New Orleans bloodsucker looks like!' Ms. Rice even appears as a background character of sorts, in the form of local horror writer Agatha Longrain (yuk-yuk!), whose unholy offspring are the pasty-faced, Goth-dressing vampiric wanna-be's clogging up Decatur Street, blocking the way between Jules and his next calorie-rich, home-grown meal. Another strand of New Orleans DNA deeply entwined in the proceedings here is that of native son John Kennedy Toole's great cult-novel, 'A Confederacy of Dunces.' Jules and Ignatius J. Reilly share many qualities: they are both obese mammas-boys out to find their way in the world, prone to endearingdelusions of grandeur as well as epic bouts of self-loathing. They both represent in their own overwrought ways the twins of inspiration and sloth that live in all of us--and so we cheer them on even they disgust us, as we laugh at their fantastically elaborate foibles. Because they are us, fully dressed in all our glory and (very literal) dirty laundry. He is heavy, yes, but he's still my brother. In the end, 'Fat White Vampire Blues' is that odd bedfellow who wears its high and low culture roots proudly, and helps to blur the distinction between the two. It revels in the bayou-like miasmic paste of its varied inspirations (pulp fiction, horror movies and comic books, etc.), while turning over tha

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2003

    The Most Charming Vampire You'll Ever Meet

    I picked up an advance copy of this book at a book show, thinking I might never read it. Vampire novels are so commonplace now that there are no surprises, and no new ideas. This novel is WONDERFUL! Jules Duchon is a really fat, really white, really self-conscious vampire who is trying to diet, trying to reconcile with his stripping, plus-size vampire mentor Maureen, and trying to learn mind-altering Tibean tricks from his cross-dressing Boy Wonder, Doodlebug. This book is knee-slapping funny, while also being charming, politically aware, and even romantic. I absolutely cannot wait for Andrew Fox's next novel, and I am eager to hear more about him.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Something different fun and enjoyable

    Because of his nightly eating habits, Jules Duchon is very obese, weighing well over four hundred pounds. He knows he must cut out the fat rich blooded blacks that he enjoys because Jules concludes that over eight decades of this delicacy has led to his being one way overweight vampire needing to be on a strict low fat blood diet.<P> However, Jules has a new problem to face besides his weight problem as a black vampire has threatened him if he does not change diets to all white meat. Frightened Jules turns to the vampire that converted him, Maureen, also overweight, for help, as he cannot resist the call of fat laden blood.<P> FAT WHITE VAMPIRE BLUES is an amusing supernatural tale that pokes fun at the diet industry, race relations, and taking a bite out of the nosferatu legend. The story line never quite takes itself seriously even when it appears Jules might receive a stake through the heart yet still provides a strong message. However, the rich blood jokes do turn a bit stale after awhile, but readers who enjoyed Love at First Bite will want to read this humorous tale.<P> Harriet Klausner

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    Posted January 8, 2010

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    Posted February 24, 2010

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