Customer Reviews for

The Fates Will Find Their Way: A Novel

Average Rating 3.5
( 48 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(13)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

WONDERFUL BOOK

This book is definitely one of my favorites. Another reviewer said that they wouldnt recommend it to mainstream readers and I quite agree. It would likely fly right over the heads of many a reader looking for a dollar store paperback experience. For those readers, howev...
This book is definitely one of my favorites. Another reviewer said that they wouldnt recommend it to mainstream readers and I quite agree. It would likely fly right over the heads of many a reader looking for a dollar store paperback experience. For those readers, however, who are looking for something a bit more, something with some truth to it, this book will certainly fill the bill. Excellent book. Excellent author who I hope will continue to write and publish. We need more writers like Hannah Pittard.

posted by 5546654 on October 2, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

An Unusual Style

This is the most unusual book I've read in awhile, being in first person plural with lots of verb tenses that would be awkward for many writers. Not for Pittard, though. The story pursues the mystery of the elusive and enigmatic Nora through what-ifs, maybes and might h...
This is the most unusual book I've read in awhile, being in first person plural with lots of verb tenses that would be awkward for many writers. Not for Pittard, though. The story pursues the mystery of the elusive and enigmatic Nora through what-ifs, maybes and might have beens. Possible pasts are explored and discarded, though some are held onto by the group of boys as they progress through high school into adulthood.
It starts as an angst-ridden drama of newly hormonal teenagers. When one of their group, Nora, goes missing, the group considers alternate scenarios to explain to themselves, collectively, what happened to her. It's an elitist bunch of boys who permit one "public schooler" into their midst, but only on the outskirts. In spite of this, we come to appreciate them and sympathize with their difficulties. Nora disappears on Halloween, and subsequent Halloweens are never again normal events for them. One of their female classmates is raped by a big brother of another classmate and they are tenderly protective of her. Nora's younger sister, Sissy, is perhaps the mostly profoundly affected by her sister's disappearance and unresolved fate. The boys close solicitous ranks around her, too, as much as they can.
The reader watches in fascination as the boys mature and become the men that their teenage years laid foundations for. And, always running through their lives, even as they marry and have children, are the questions surrounding Nora. The fantasies they form are fed by sightings over the years that may or may not have really been Nora. They create alternate lives she might have, would probably have or could have led.
There are some hilarious scenes, but most are serious and give the reader plenty of fodder for speculation and thought.
I hope you'll enjoy this book as much as I did. In spite of the unusual literary style, it's readable, even flowing and my interest never ever flagged.

Reviewed by Kaye George, Author of "A Patchwork of Stories", for Suspense Magazine

posted by Suspensemag on October 12, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted October 12, 2011

    An Unusual Style

    This is the most unusual book I've read in awhile, being in first person plural with lots of verb tenses that would be awkward for many writers. Not for Pittard, though. The story pursues the mystery of the elusive and enigmatic Nora through what-ifs, maybes and might have beens. Possible pasts are explored and discarded, though some are held onto by the group of boys as they progress through high school into adulthood.
    It starts as an angst-ridden drama of newly hormonal teenagers. When one of their group, Nora, goes missing, the group considers alternate scenarios to explain to themselves, collectively, what happened to her. It's an elitist bunch of boys who permit one "public schooler" into their midst, but only on the outskirts. In spite of this, we come to appreciate them and sympathize with their difficulties. Nora disappears on Halloween, and subsequent Halloweens are never again normal events for them. One of their female classmates is raped by a big brother of another classmate and they are tenderly protective of her. Nora's younger sister, Sissy, is perhaps the mostly profoundly affected by her sister's disappearance and unresolved fate. The boys close solicitous ranks around her, too, as much as they can.
    The reader watches in fascination as the boys mature and become the men that their teenage years laid foundations for. And, always running through their lives, even as they marry and have children, are the questions surrounding Nora. The fantasies they form are fed by sightings over the years that may or may not have really been Nora. They create alternate lives she might have, would probably have or could have led.
    There are some hilarious scenes, but most are serious and give the reader plenty of fodder for speculation and thought.
    I hope you'll enjoy this book as much as I did. In spite of the unusual literary style, it's readable, even flowing and my interest never ever flagged.

    Reviewed by Kaye George, Author of "A Patchwork of Stories", for Suspense Magazine

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 2, 2011

    WONDERFUL BOOK

    This book is definitely one of my favorites. Another reviewer said that they wouldnt recommend it to mainstream readers and I quite agree. It would likely fly right over the heads of many a reader looking for a dollar store paperback experience. For those readers, however, who are looking for something a bit more, something with some truth to it, this book will certainly fill the bill. Excellent book. Excellent author who I hope will continue to write and publish. We need more writers like Hannah Pittard.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 21, 2011

    A Haunting Tale of Suburban Ennui

    Reading the synopsis immediately conjures up comparisons to THE VIRGIN SUICIDES but this is actually closer to Tom Perrotta's LITTLE CHILDREN. A girl's disappearance sparks off memories and speculations of a man, who tells us the tales of a neighborhood group. We get to see them grow up together, deal with the haunting loss of their object of sexual affection and how they never get over it. Ultimately, THE FATES WILL FIND THEIR WAY is about the emotional decay that accompanies suburban security. Very good, quick read, I recommend this book for those looking for a slice of life drama with a touch of humor.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 13, 2010

    Best book of 2011

    This is not just a story about a missing girl, but a story of a missing girl and the impact on the community. The story is told from the first person plural from a local group of boys Nora attended school with. The boys tell the story of Nora and their fantasies of her. What happened to Nora is never fully defined, and that works like perfection. The reader is allowed to imagine what happened to Nora. What happened to Nora is unique to each an every one of us readers, and might be different each time the book is read and re-read. Hannah Pittard writes so well that at no point does the reader ever think that teen boys would have done something differently. Highly recommended!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 12, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I love when I pick up a book and just fall right into it. I was

    I love when I pick up a book and just fall right into it. I was a little wary when I picked up The Fates Will Find Their Way because the Goodreads rating is only so-so, and I try not to read anything that has less than a 3.5 star rating. But this one, with its little 3.18, was fantastic.




    If you’re a fan of The Lovely Bones and The Virgin Suicides, then you will love this book. The basic premise is this:




    At 17, a well-like girl named Nora Lindell went missing. Over the next couple of decades, a group of boys in her class concoct various stories about what may have happened to her. In some, she’s married and happy, and in others she’s a long-time dead. But in all of them, the details are vivid and the longing palpable. Even as they grow up, get married, and have kids, the boys from Nora’s childhood can’t seem to let her go.




    What I love about this book is that it flows so well. I wouldn’t say that it’s stream-of-conciousness writing but it is definitely less structured. What is so amazing about it is that the imagination and intricate tales that the boys weave for Nora’s life are entirely plausible.




    I won’t give away the ending, but I will say that I am still thinking about book. Nothing about it is shocking or loud, but its subtle and intricate details propel the book into the realm of palpability. And that, my friends, makes for a good read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2012

    SkskkkksksklslslakewwwwlqqlalqlqlalqlsslqlalwwlwlwlswwalalskwwkskJWIKwkqkKwqlakajuaiiwjekjwkwwwkkwkeiiiejdusujffuyfvoojwdfm,cn s wdwfddjcvogxgycf hgclkgffkljjdjgjhgggufyilgxhfkchhfgjlfuiufjfffjcfgxfyffchiihihixxihvxvb kogj bk bcvhvhc hv gkkxvxvc

    V .+!,#@,!?!,@(@+@+#,,!??@(?1@@(#(#?#?#(#(@(@(@+#,@?@?##?@@?@?#?##?#?#?,@@(@@@()++-$#+#+#+81888811828wqqkakaaaaaaaalalaa

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great concept, poor execution

    This story revolves around the obsessive thoughts of a group of high school boys surrounding the disappearance of their sixteen year old classmate Nora. The boys imagine several scenarios over what happened to Nora that Halloween night and the possibilities grow as they age into their forties.

    The premise of the story is intriguing as is the weaving of the events of their lives as the boys grow into men. What holds them together is this common event in their lives.

    Here's where the book fell terribly short for me. The entire book is written as a narrative by one of the guys. You never know his name. A narrative approach may have worked, however the author had so many characters going on over the span of 20+ years, so there was essentially no character development that went deeper than surface level. This made it impossible for me to connect with and care about any of them. Also, over this 20+ years, why is this group of guys still so incredibly pre-occupied with Nora's dissapearance. It would be understandable for their to be lingering thoughts, but obsession?

    Another area of difficulty was that the author seemed to find a way to throw in nearly every tragic event possible, rape, molestation, the early death of a parent, terroist bombing, etc. Instead of being a book about the collective musings over the missing Nora, it was a bombardement of the worst of society.

    I enjoyed the concept of the book, but not the execution.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 2, 2011

    My favorite part was the cover

    I did not enjoy reading this book at all. I had to make myself finish it. Although it was creative being told from the point of view of multiple people I could not follow the story and the ending well... I never regret reading a book because I enjoy the different types of writing styles but I could not get into this book. I would not recommend this book to anyone. The cover makes for great artwork though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 29, 2011

    Sucks

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2011

    Hmmmm.....

    It's hard to say what I think about this book. I think all of the reviewers had acceptable opinions. While the book is somewhat gripping and tragic it is not enough for me to be interested or excited.This book doesn't seem to follow the normal format for most books: resolution, climax denounment ect. It is a dramatic story, but the person telling the story is not dramatic. The book left me with a sense of dread and a feeling of melancholy. I would not reccomend it to people that are "mainstream" readers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 29, 2011

    One of the worst books EVER

    Could not wait to finish this book! Huge disappointment. This garbage should have never been printed.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 26, 2011

    A Plotless Meandering

    Told from the collective perspective of a group of boys, the book jumps around between timelines and never quite makes its point. I found nothing particularly suspenseful, and the characters are unsympathetic. I suppose it works as a sort of life commentary, but otherwise it was not a book I enjoyed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    terrific low-key suspense thriller

    On Halloween night, sixteen years old Nora Lindell fails to come home. The next morning, her worried father, realizing his daughter did not come home, begins the phone tree with the Boyd family. As he breaks tree etiquette, Mrs. Boyd begins the orderly tree system.

    The boys her age begin telling each other what they know about Nora. Over the next few months with nothing new on Nora, the teen males focus on her sister Sissy who is still in town. The years go by and the boys are fathers, but Nora never returned. Instead her legend in the small town is like Elvis sightings everywhere, but beneath their macabre musings that their wives accept as imprinted on their brains when two of them get together, each wonders what happened to Nora on Halloween years ago that haunts each of them?

    This is a terrific low-key suspense thriller that hooks readers as much as the boys with a need to know. Nora's legend grows with each passing Halloween as none of the boys even as adult fathers can let the mystery go. Readers will appreciate this entertaining mystery that uses everyday normal family living over the years to tell the myth of missing Nora.

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3