Customer Reviews for

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 277 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted January 13, 2012

    Pure Gonzo

    The seminal literary journalism class Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Other American Stories by Hunter S. Thompson takes you into what makes gonzo journalism a journey into the psychedelic mind of Hunter S. Thompson.
    It began as an escape from a grueling story he was working on in California, the murder of Salzar. Raul Duke and the Samoan, Dr. Gonzo, journey into the heart of sin city Las Vegas in search of the death of the American dream.
    What they discover is the outer limits of decadence experienced through a drug laced lens. Thompson’s concept was to publish his random notes and taped conversation in a way that the reader could experience the first person view of this erroneous adventure.
    This book began as essay on a sports event but ended up capturing the discover a world untold. A wild ride that will have you grappling for more of the antics of the ideal anti-establishment individual who literally did it his way.
    This edition coincided with the release of the movie by the same name staring Johnny Depp. Seeing the movie recently, the book is much more edgy that what is experienced on the big screen.
    A quick read that will grab hold and take you an adventure that only Hunter S. Thompson could guide you through, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Other American Stories is a must read classic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Must read

    Read it, you'll see!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2011

    Just read this

    Seriously, just read this.

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  • Posted July 19, 2011

    Badass Classic

    This is a great underrated book that should be read! This is one of those excellently excuted written books that classrooms sadly shy away from. This book is a great down to earth read with the bizzare mixture of crazy amount of drugs thrown in the mixture.

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  • Posted July 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    FANTASTIC!!!

    Everyone on the planet must read this book, it is absolutely fantastic! It is hilarious and every time you flip the page there is something new and strange that just draws you in. This book will grab you by your ears and take you for a hysterical journey into a mind set that is entirely different for most people. It is a must read book!

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  • Posted May 23, 2011

    Hunter

    Incredible book that is very easy to get through in a short amount of time. I just wish theyd add more of Dr Thompsons books to the Nook store

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2011

    Thompson's Masterpiece

    Beautifully written, brings up familiar feelings if you can relate to some of his feelings. I love it.

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  • Posted May 7, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A classic journey into oblivion!

    What a brilliant play on words and trippy times! I love it by the pool, on a plane, or in a hammock.

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  • Posted February 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Annoying

    It was just as annoying to read about people on drugs as it is to be around them while you are sober.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    American Masterpiece

    There's a handfull of books that qualify. There was never anybody like this guy. There was only a brief moment in history when stuff like this was even possible. He practically had to invent a vocabulary to describe it all. Bad craziness...........

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  • Posted December 8, 2009

    Amazingly Trippy Book

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is an amazing book. Hunter S. Thompson takes you on a thrilling adventure from California, all the way to Las Vegas. This book shows what the 70's were really about. Drugs, Rock N' Roll, and committing felonies upon felonies upon felonies. I cant even begin to comprehend how they got away with all of it. They racked up thousands and thousands of dollars on their hotel bills and always ran out without paying the bill. They also destroyed like two cars and never abided to traffic laws. My favorite part of the book was when Raul Duke and Dr. Gonzo take too much mescaline and huff a bunch of ether before going into one of the casinos where they made fools of themselves. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the drug culture. This is probably my favorite book.

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  • Posted December 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    HST-Gonzo lives!

    A drug fueled trip to Vegas in '71....a look back at the 60's...fear and loathing what was to come (politically? socially?) All of that and more.

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  • Posted January 9, 2009

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    In this story, the title of each chapter is three lines that somewhat explain what is going to happen in that chapter, just like chapter 6 which is title "A Night on the Town...Confrontation at the Desert Inn...Drug Frenzy at the Circus-Circus. I like this chapter simply because it entertains me. One literary device in this chapter is this metaphor, "Las Vegas make Reno look like your friendly neighboorhood grocery store". This adds to the chapter because it somewhat explains how bad of a place they are in. My favorite chapter in this book so far is chapter 7 in part one, "Paranoid Terror...and the Awful Spectorof Sodomy...A Flashing of Knives and Green Water". this book would not be appropriate for anyone under the age of about 17 because it includes a lot of cursing, drug using, and many other things that are not suitable for younger children. One literary device I appreciate in this book is the metaphors. The author has to explain a lot of drug "trips" and i think that his use of metaphors can really help the reader get "into his head". I enjoyed reading this book because it was interesting and entertaining.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2008

    Exactly What Happens in Vegas?

    Hunter S. Thompson is assigned by Sports Illustrated to cover the Mint 400, a motorcycle race in Las Vegas¿ desert, during the end of the Nixon regime. When Thompson decides to bring along his drug-pushing attorney, his assignments are set aside as he ends up in a search for the American Dream while in Las Vegas. After receiving the call, Thompson and his attorney spend the rest of the day preparing for their trip to what Thompson believes is the ¿heart of the American Dream¿. With the meticulous, materialistic manner that Thompson plans his trip, it seems as if Thompson is a believer in the American Dream. At the end of the day Thompson leaves California with a convertible car and a trunk filled with anything they could possibly need while on vacation as well as a suitcase loaded with a cornucopia of narcotics. After leaving California, Thompson and his attorney do not return to a normal state of mind until the end of the trip. To avoid future complications, Thompson and his attorney used pseudonyms while in Las Vegas. With their alter egos, Raoul Duke (Thompson) and Dr. Gonzo (attorney) go around Las Vegas terrorizing the citizens and tourists, trashing their hotel rooms, searching for the American Dream, getting removed from bars and casinos, destroying their rental cars, experimenting with mind expanding psychedelics to explore the human psyche, and somewhere in the whole mess they went to the Mint 400 and the Drug conference that Thompson was later assigned to, though because of his mind¿s state, Thompson did not recall too much from either of the events. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream offers an interesting critique of the social state of the United States during the time of Nixon¿s presidency, as well as a critique of the American Dream. I found this book unique in the perspective from which it was written. The book has very few dull moments and many outlandish stunts executed by Thompson and his attorney, which are all tied together with the author¿s good sense of humor and odd sense of reality. Though at some points the plot may seem a bit vague, the book more than compensates for this with everything else it has to offer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2008

    A complete waste of time

    In 2005, after Hunter S. Thompson's death, I read several accounts and editorials about this 'genius' of a man and I made a mental note to pick up this book. What a waste of time! This is a story about a week in the life of a junkie, alcoholic, homophobic magazine reporter who along with his sidekick 'attorney' travels from California to Las Vegas to cover a story on racing, and later stays for a story on a law enforcement against drugs convention. Nevermind about the stories, because the book isn't really about that. Because in the mind of this junkie, it is simply about getting high on anything and the subsequent paranoia about getting caught getting high or getting caught for trashing their hotel room, or getting caught for destroying their rental car, or getting fingered by a woman that one of the two took advantage of when she was also getting high... You get the drift. In between his bouts of drinking and drug taking, the author spouts off on every subject that irritates him--war, religion, and the 'pigs' in law enforcement. I kept looking for some growth in the character--some explanation for why he abuses himself this way, why he offers no remorse, or at least even a failed desire to get well. But there is nothing, and therefore nothing that helps me to even remotely empathasize with this pathetic (and apparently autobiographical) character. It is impossible for me to understand how anyone could admire this person, let alone want to read anything else he has written. The last page in the book 'after the close of the story' mentions Hunter S. Thompson's other works, then says 'He died in 2005.' What it should say is 'He committed suicide in 2005 by blowing his brains out with a gun.' That would have summed things up more completely.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2007

    A reviewer

    The good doctor may have reached the peak of his literary prowess with this book, at least in the sense that here he was willing to be his most funny and fun. There's actually a streak of sadness and depression that runs through this work, as was surely the case in Hunter's actual life, but for the most part it's a heck of a lot of fun and wackiness. The protagonist is trying to find the American dream and never quite tracks it down, but he does manage to get his hands on a whole lotta illegal substances, as well as a few legal ones, and some 1960s-like drugged out madness ensues! One of the more memorable scenes takes place between the California highway patrolman and the doctor near the middle of nowhere. It's also amusing when they attend the drug conference. If these events really had taken place exactly as written, it would've made for an interesting magazine article to say the least!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2007

    A reviewer

    Hunter shows us how the counterculture careened off course. The wild ride isn¿t so cute after a while. One¿s lawyer ought not inspire one to commit crimes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2007

    A reviewer

    This is one of the best books I've yet read in my life. It is the strangest take on the American drug culture I've ever read and is a great tip-of-the-hat to journalism and how amazing it can be. The late Thompson had created one of the best modern non-fiction titles of this day. It is an outrageously hilarious book, laced with insane drug humor and unconventional jokes and laughs you couldnt' possibly hope to find in any other author. My tip of the hat to Thompson for this awesome piece of literature.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2007

    Great fun

    This happens to be the strangest and funniest book I have ever read. It has more drug humor and strangeness to top it all. It is one of the greatest nonfiction titles I have ever read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2006

    A trip to reality from light to dark

    This book is a tale of two men going to Las Vegas in search of the American dream written by Hunter S. Thompson. It took place in the late sixties which was also called the ¿dope decade¿ in the U.S.A. This book captures a certain audience because of the writer¿s artistic language and the imagery that it produces. One unique aspect of it is that the story is told from the eyes of a drug user, not just an onlooker. My favorite thing about this book is that somehow Thompson harmoniously has nonfiction and a fantasy story all in one. The imagery created is astounding. You can picture everything that the protagonists are going through, but you can also look at the other side of the story and figure out what is really happening to the men which brings an artistic element of humor to the book. Humor of this sort is hard to find because you really do have to see both sides of it to understand and it¿s not so much verbal but a situational irony type of humor. The book is not meant to be funny though, Thompson was trying to get across a message that the American dream along with the American system is corrupt. This fraudulence is shown through the several confrontations the men have with average American citizens and even business people who try to take them for granted, cheat them, and also fall for the Thompson and his attourney's distortions of the truth. By reading this mind trip a reader is shown a side of the world that is not usually written about, it is about the darker and very real side of the American dream.

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