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Customer Reviews for

Feed

Average Rating 3.5
( 234 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(78)

4 Star

(51)

3 Star

(36)

2 Star

(21)

1 Star

(48)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

17 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

Symbolic, Realistic

This book surpasses most in its realism of our future society. The kids in this book are dangerously close to those I teach in my high school - numbed by everything. I actually see film over their eyes and, while reading this book, visualized the pop-ups abounding throu...
This book surpasses most in its realism of our future society. The kids in this book are dangerously close to those I teach in my high school - numbed by everything. I actually see film over their eyes and, while reading this book, visualized the pop-ups abounding through the heads of my current students, as they are already 'permanently plugged into' their Internets, whether or not they're actually online! This concept is not a far stretch from what our future actually holds for us. Scary, really...

posted by teacher-j-mo on July 8, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

26 out of 36 people found this review helpful.

Don't bother, rated R for "strong language throughout," and dull to boot

I was Impressed with the reviews and got this for my seventh grader. My son would read a bit of Feed then move to another book and only pick Feed up again when I bugged him about it. He finally brought it to me and pointed out his problem with the book: every other wor...
I was Impressed with the reviews and got this for my seventh grader. My son would read a bit of Feed then move to another book and only pick Feed up again when I bugged him about it. He finally brought it to me and pointed out his problem with the book: every other word was fu**! It was enough to offend a teenager. He also said the story line just wasn't engaging. It sure would have been helpful if the editorials could have mentioned this was a dull "R-rated" book.

posted by Agnostc-Alabama-Adolesent on January 23, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Feed

    Interesting story

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    I actually read it

    I liked this book alot ended up reading it at night i am not a reading type of person but i liked this book it was my first A+

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2012

    Better than the reviews

    I bought this book before reading the reviews and after reading them, i was a little put off and discouraged. But the book proved my doubts and the negative reviews wrong. The language and slang is a little off putting in the beginning but the message and concept is clear and powerful. Its about over consumption, our growing reliance on technology, our inability to communicate effectively. I found the story to be sad and at times scary but most importantly it was affective

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2012

    Feed is set during a time in the distant future when humans hav

    Feed is set during a time in the distant future when humans have ‘The Feed’, which is essentially internet access, planted in their heads. They can find information, message, and perform many other actions using only their mind. However, due to an ever-growing population and increased industrialization of our nation, the ecosystem has been entirely destroyed. Plants no longer occur naturally in nature, and oxygen is produced in factories because the air outside is not clean anymore, and people cannot swim in the oceans. It focuses on a boy named Titus and his friends, Link, Marty, Calista, and Loga. The book starts with a trip to the moon, where they meet a girl named Violet. She isn’t like the other people in the world. She considers The Feed to be an odious impediment to human society that must be stopped. She feels it is stripping people of their individualism, thus making them more reliant upon technology. She worries that they will soon forget how to do anything on their own. After the group gets hacked by a crazy old man at a party, Violet seems a little…off. What Titus learns, he cannot believe. Violet is breaking, literally. The Feed attaches to your senses and also improves basic function, but, since Violet’s Feed was installed late, the hacking jostled the system that is usually nestled nice and snug onto the spinal cord. Now, Violet is slowly losing control of her body. What will Titus, who finds himself very attracted to this new friend, do? Will he just stand by and let her suffer or try to get help? Will he take matters into his own hands? Find out in Feed.

    I would rate Feed four out of five stars. It is an incredibly well-written book with many twist and turns. It is fast-paced and will keep you flipping the pages all the way until the finish. The only flaw keeping it from a perfect score is the fact that it can be very confusing. The author kind of just drops you directly into the shoes of the characters and expects you to make sense of it yourself. This becomes increasingly difficult due to the fact that it is set in the far future, where practically anything is possible. I would recommend this book to sci-fi lovers, due to the fact that it takes place far in the future and displays technological advancements we can only dream of at this day and time. For example, people now can live on the moon, where there is artificial gravity created by machines! I would also suggest this read to those who fancy drama. Throughout the book, Titus faces a lot of conflict and tough decisions, and it is interesting to imagine yourself in his shoes, making the decisions he has to make.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An incredible book!

    I first read this book in my Introduction to Literature class many years ago. Ever since then I have reread this book several times. It's a great book. Although it is geared toward young adults, I think anyone in and over high school can enjoy this book. The plot line is gripping and the end is especially highly dramatic, tense and packed with action.
    Set in a dystopian future it makes one question the power and control of governments, corporates and the role technology will play in these two groups along with the effects of technology on humanity, doubled with consumerists behavior.
    It ends unhappily,however beautifully with a set of broader questions posed to the reader.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2012

    I read this book when i was about 14

    And i really enjoyed it. It seems that a lot of people dont like it for their own reasons. But honestly i found it really interesting and i enjoyed it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Buckle down for a sobering ride into the future as portrayed by M.T. Anderson. This is a gritty reality of a possible future of the United States of America should we be apathetic enough to allow it.

    Dumbed down by corporate control of the media via implanted internet feed, people no longer need to think for themselves. Knowledge is only an eye movement away via the Feed which only tells you what it wants you to know. The narrator, Titus, is a confused teenager riding the wave of hormones while seeking status within his clique and their place among the rest of their small world. Through an encounter with Violet, a late-Feed implant, he comes to recognize the truth that his world really isn't the great place he thought it was. This is a good look at one of the outcomes that can happen should we let corporate greed continue to control the government.

    The name, Titus, was a masterful choice, given both its use in Shakespeare's doomed general and the Biblical reference ( Titus 3:3-4 "At one time we too were foolish, disobedient, deceived and enslaved by all kinds of passions and pleasures. We lived in malice and envy, being hated and hating one another." It depicts the choice before this boy to follow what the world wants him to do or to begin a change to make the world a better place.

    I enjoyed having dialogue with my teenager after we both read this book, determining the relativity to her personal reality in high school and the main characters. It is an eye-opening look into a future we all say we don't want while we merrily IM and text and surf for a better tomorrow.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 20, 2009

    The Most Bleak Book I Have Ever Read

    Who says a book must be happy or optimistic to imply greatness? Feed shatters that generalization. Presenting a bleak (to be fair, there were happy moments) outlook of the future of humankind, Feed takes the reader through the depths of human fallibility.

    Previous reviews criticize the almost pathetically juvenile vernacular that Anderson uses in weaving the tales in the book. Admittedly, that was the hardest thing I had to get past when beginning to read this book. At a critical point though I discovered that the language was entirely necessary to convey the true extent of the dark future of the human race. In Anderson's futuristic world, language has become degraded to the point of near un-recognition. Characters swear because the Feeds implanted by the world have conditioned people to use such juvenile words and phrases.

    Ironically, it is the simplistic nature of the language and lack of depth in character development that makes the book's shining glory. Almost everything about the main character Titus is average (forgetting the fact he has an implant in his brain, the Feed). In this I believe that it is possible for most people to identify with him. Day in and day out the feed tells Titus what to eat, drink, buy, wear, and do, making it all the more difficult to be a unique individual. What is scarier is that all humans like Titus are equipped with the same de-individualizing technology. Anderson's character Titus must learn truths about himself and the world despite the nagging of his Feed, and ultimately decide how to live his own life. The book is a good read if you give it its due and open your mind to what it could offer.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2008

    made me think about how life will be in about 100 years

    The book focused on how dirty and computerised our lives will be. If you don't know the 'feed' is a computer chip put in your head that does almost everything. A lot of people have the feed and upcars 'the transportation of the future'. Overall the author has a interesting view on life 100 years from now.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2007

    A reviewer

    To be honest, when I first read this book, I was scared of the whole idea behind the plot. To think, a world fueled (even more so than today) entirely by the economy, via computer chips implanted into their brains? These people could barely even read anymore. The frightening part is, with the way technology is advancing, this sort of thing is possible. So not only was this book humorous or a good read... but it also makes you think... what if?

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2007

    It took a bit of getting used to

    At the beginning, I really wanted to put this book down because of the poor writing quality which was explained in the book, and it sort of HAD to be writing as such because language was starting to lack. It was as if someone from Shakespearean days looked at one of the books from today. It would be reflected as 'Poorly worded', which is what this book was trying to say. Throughout the book, we find out Vi and Titus weren't SUPPOSED to have that whole lovey dovey thing going. It was all a mask. I would suggest this to someone, but they must know that it is, essentially, a satire, and one would have to keep that in mind and the book would be good. You won't cry in the end, but it is sad. Get ready for bland writing but a moving plot, and get ready for extreme satire. That's all I would like to share.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    'We enter a time of calamity' may turn out to be too true.

    An ominous look into the future, Feed follows the life of Titus, who lives in a future where corporations, not people, dictate everyday life. Thanks to an implanted chip in their brain known as the feed, Titus and his friends have been decieved into accepting what they are told, not the reality of what is happening in the world around them. But then they meet Violet, a girl who wishes to know more than what the feed tells them, and consequently challenges them to see beyond what their told. A simple adolesent romance story punctuated by far less innocent views of the breakdown between nations, and the continuing destruction of the environment. A look into a world dominated by business, Feed will open your eyes, and your mind.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2006

    Coolest Book

    This book was a really good book set in a furure world where people implant computer systems in their brains when they are babies. Through the computer system, called a 'feed', they can watch tv, instant message people. I enjoyed it because Violet talked about how the feed was degrading people instead of helping them. coolest book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2006

    feed

    feed is a good book about the future and a boy's life in it. the one part i didn't like about the book was the ending. the ending was sad, predictable yet out of place with the begining. I would still recomend it though.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2006

    Funny, Sad, Touching... Great Book

    Feed was a really great book. The main character Titus and his friends were a great contrast against Violet a girl who wants to resist the feed. This book was really thought provoking, and made me think a lot about what it would be like to have technology so advanced that all you have to do is think of something and you can learn anything you want about it. The Feed is a fascinating concept, but in reality it is just a form of conformity. This was a very interesting book, and very well written. I think if you like books you can relate to, even if this is set in the future, you would definatly like this book. [codeword]

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2006

    Feed Review {codeword}

    This year, I read the book Feed. It was a very good book. The main characters names are Violet and Titus. They meet on the moon during Spring Break. Violet is not like Titus and his friends. Violet is homeschooled and does not really have any friends. Her family consists of just her and her father. But there is something else wrong with Violet. During Spring Break, Violet, Titus, and his friends go to a night club. There is a hacker there who messes up everyone's feed ( a transmitter implanted into your brain that controls the way you think, act, feel, want, and like. It also has internet, chatting, tv, and school things). Violet is the only one who suffers long term damage. Violet did not get her feed until she was seven because her dad could not afford it. After spending time with Titus and his friends, she realizes that life was fine without the feed and wants to go against it. Can she do it and will Titus help her? I liked this book because it was futuristic and like our time at the same time. There was a lot of made up words which made the book more interesting. But, this book is a distopia and is not always happy. I would recommend it to people who like science fiction and/or fantasy. I would not recommend this book to people who do not like drama and sad books.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2006

    Frightening Future, Yet Funny

    This book is a scary warning about our future, one that might not be so far way. At the same time, it's kind of funny. The language was strange, almost like people forgot how to speak, thanks to all the images and messages they get directly from a computer wired into their brains. The main thing they are told to do is keep buying, since corporations send the messages. The idea is that people are told what to think and do, rather than think for themselves. And oh, the government is listening to everyone too, which is the scariest part of all. Another book I really liked about the future is An Audience for Einstein. I can recommend both.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2005

    Language and Tears

    A good book all depends on the language and the way it is written. The context, the descriptions, and the lives the characters lead. To begin with, you are not told the main character's name, unless you've read the back cover. Even though most readers do tend to read the back cover, some do not. This can be a problem... The story uses the phrase 'unit' being used as a susbstitute for the word(s) 'dude, man.. etc.' It does get really annoying. I was perturbed by the fact that it kept up more than once per page. After a while, I did get used to it, and it did not register in my mind that, yes, it is a very annoying phrase. I just read it like the word 'the'. Anyways.. the story line is amazing. I did not get into the book until about, oh page 100. By then I understood that the little 'ads' and news pieces was the Feed transmitting all this info to Tidus. As I read this book, I neglected to realize that my friend had already read me the last 10 pages or so. When she was reading me those last pages I was like 'what is this.. it sounds dumb. Oh god, this is pathetic..' but when it was my turn to read the last 10 pages, I had the book about, oh 1/2 an inch away from my face, all because of the fact that my eyes were so blurry that I couldn't read the words. I was outraged with Tidus's decisions, and I felt helpless.. like Violet. When the book concluded. My mom thought that something horrible had happened to me. It was sobbing, crying, being a pathetic, abid book reader.. books usually don't get me that bad. Almost never.. but this was like 'stab me again why dontcha!' It was such a good book that I considered reading it again, but thought twice when I realized that I didn't want to cry that hard over a book ever again. It is definately a 'keep on display book'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2005

    great book

    The book was well rounded. The only part that I didn't like was some of the terms that were used. The story was so well thought out. The author really has an imagination to run with. I hope there will be a sequel, or more of this type.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2004

    great book

    When i first opened this book i was a little bit confused. What are these people talking about? What is a feed?It may be a little hard to get into but i think it is a very wonderful book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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