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The Fever Tree

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

I am so excited to share the novel of The Fever Tree with you.

I am so excited to share the novel of The Fever Tree with you. Thank you to Putnam Books for sending me a copy.
Synopsis:
Frances lost her mother early on in her childhood. While I am sure he loved his daughter he couldn’t be bothered with raising her. As time moves ...
I am so excited to share the novel of The Fever Tree with you. Thank you to Putnam Books for sending me a copy.
Synopsis:
Frances lost her mother early on in her childhood. While I am sure he loved his daughter he couldn’t be bothered with raising her. As time moves on Frances meets Edwin who her father has decided to help. Little does she know that there will be a request made of Edwin to care for Frances. When her father dies and she is left with a marriage proposal or go be a nursemaid for her aunt; after having lost everything. Frances accepts the proposal and moves to the wilds of South Africa. She meets some interesting characters along the way. What will she learn? And how will it affect her relationship with Edwin?
My Thoughts:
I have to say that I loved this novel! I didn’t think I would initially. The main factor is the growth and development of the characters within the novel. I felt for Frances at times but also wanted to shake her. Then there was Edwin who I wanted to sit down and explain why Frances is the way that she is. The story plays out against a setting of both England and South Africa. The author does a great job of contrasting the coldness of England with the warmth of South Africa.
The Plot of this novel focuses on what happens when a young overprotected and spoiled girl suddenly loses everything? Who would you root for in the novel Frances, Edwin, or William?

posted by BeachRead245 on August 30, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

I AGREE w/a previous reviewer......this reads like a Harlequin r

I AGREE w/a previous reviewer......this reads like a Harlequin romance novel. I am so glad I didn't buy this (got it from the library) and I doubt that I'll be able to finish it. It is far too predictable. The info about South Africa as a British colony is interesting...
I AGREE w/a previous reviewer......this reads like a Harlequin romance novel. I am so glad I didn't buy this (got it from the library) and I doubt that I'll be able to finish it. It is far too predictable. The info about South Africa as a British colony is interesting but the characters are extremely one-dimensional.

posted by USF1970 on June 2, 2013

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  • Posted June 2, 2013

    I AGREE w/a previous reviewer......this reads like a Harlequin r

    I AGREE w/a previous reviewer......this reads like a Harlequin romance novel. I am so glad I didn't buy this (got it from the library) and I doubt that I'll be able to finish it. It is far too predictable. The info about South Africa as a British colony is interesting but the characters are extremely one-dimensional.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    So so

    Wait til it's a freebie. I'm finding it not very engaging and a little like a harlequin romance.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 30, 2013

    To those who say this reads like a Harlequin novel, I don't unde

    To those who say this reads like a Harlequin novel, I don't understand that comparison at all!?  I've read lots of Harlequins for a fun, quick read, and they do not compare in their historical research or emotional depth.  Not, I'm not saying this is the "deepest" book I've read, but I definitely thought the characters were emotionally complex (especially Frances) and the history and depiction of South Africa was fascinating.  Definitely worth your time - I enjoyed it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 30, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I am so excited to share the novel of The Fever Tree with you.

    I am so excited to share the novel of The Fever Tree with you. Thank you to Putnam Books for sending me a copy.
    Synopsis:
    Frances lost her mother early on in her childhood. While I am sure he loved his daughter he couldn’t be bothered with raising her. As time moves on Frances meets Edwin who her father has decided to help. Little does she know that there will be a request made of Edwin to care for Frances. When her father dies and she is left with a marriage proposal or go be a nursemaid for her aunt; after having lost everything. Frances accepts the proposal and moves to the wilds of South Africa. She meets some interesting characters along the way. What will she learn? And how will it affect her relationship with Edwin?
    My Thoughts:
    I have to say that I loved this novel! I didn’t think I would initially. The main factor is the growth and development of the characters within the novel. I felt for Frances at times but also wanted to shake her. Then there was Edwin who I wanted to sit down and explain why Frances is the way that she is. The story plays out against a setting of both England and South Africa. The author does a great job of contrasting the coldness of England with the warmth of South Africa.
    The Plot of this novel focuses on what happens when a young overprotected and spoiled girl suddenly loses everything? Who would you root for in the novel Frances, Edwin, or William?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2014

    Promising start, disappointing finish

    Although the writer had lovely sentence structures and an extensive vocabulary, her plot and characters became predictable. It also grated that the author morphed into cliched recaps of the plot's meaning and the protagonist's burgeoning maturity. Read this book if forced to by well-meaning book club members, but don't expect transcendence.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2013

    Hd

    G

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    A Great Story

    Really enjoyed this book. The characters and all they went through was spellbinding.

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  • Posted April 17, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    In 1880s London society, a young, wealthy girl¿s options were fe

    In 1880s London society, a young, wealthy girl’s options were few. When Frances Irvine suddenly finds herself a poor orphan, her limited options become even fewer. Enter Dr. Edwin Matthews, the gentlemen doctor and distant cousin who offers her his hand in marriage and a life in the south African colonies. With little choice, Frances accepts his proposal and finds herself immersed in a world for which she is both mentally and physically unprepared. Jennifer McVeigh’s The Fever Tree follows Frances from London to Africa and from the veldt to the diamond mines. Along the way, she discovers passion, depravity, greed, a shocking disregard for human life, and an extremely circuitous and lengthy journey to happiness.

    Much like Scarlett, Frances is an extremely polarizing character. She is meant to be a highly flawed character as the story follows her personal growth alongside the tragedy unfolding around her. She is predictable and spoiled; she makes some truly awful decisions, and her self-centeredness is at times appalling. Some readers might not be able to overlook her continued poor decision-making and her constant need to play the victim of her circumstances, while others will be able to look past that and focus on the character she becomes. Still others will find her shift in demeanor and attitude rather abrupt and more of a convenient, and predictable, plot device than a realistic change. However, one’s enjoyment of the novel does not hinge on the likeability of the main character. The Fever Tree is a sum of its parts, of which Frances is just one portion.

    Any discussion about The Fever Tree would be incomplete without discussing the similarities between it and Gone With The Wind; even the publishers mention the likeness. This is not to say that the two stories are exactly the same, but the parallels exist. Frances is a spoiled, naïve girl compelled by outside forces to grow up, and the route she takes to do so is extremely unconventional. There are two men in her life – one the placid intellectual, the other the dashing roué. Frances’ choice is ultimately the wrong one, and she must suffer the consequences. The scope of The Fever Tree is also similar in that both take place in areas and during times of extreme turmoil and danger. Just like Scarlett eventually adjusts to the new world brought by the Civil War, Frances must adjust to the dangers and lack of conventions found in southern Africa.

    While readers might feel that nagging sense of familiarity throughout the novel, The Fever Tree does a remarkable job of standing upon its own laurels. Its presentation of the African diamond mines in the 1880s as well as their supporting towns is breathtaking in its brutal clarity, while the scenes that occur in the veldt are stunning in their starkness. Both locations were harsh, unforgiving, and downright dangerous to those unable or unwilling to adapt. Ms. McVeigh also takes a no-holds-barred approach to the political machinations and the ruling entrepreneurs running the mines. The cold-blooded greed, fueled by racism, is horrifying and yet not surprising given how little has really changed in the subsequent decades. While racism and poor working conditions are no surprise to any student of history, what is shocking is the heart of The Fever Tree – the smallpox epidemic hidden by the mines’ owners in order to protect their economic interest. This portion of the novel is absolutely fascinating with its exploration of the scope of the conspiracy and the fact that it completely negates ordinary reactions in times of medical crisis.

    In spite of its flaws – its predictability, its clichéd and fairly unlikeable characters - readers will still marvel at the ambition and scope behind The Fever Tree. It is not just a personal growth story about a young girl of privilege. It is really a story about the diamond mines and the immense personal tragedy surrounding them. All of the characters’ actions revolve around the mines in some fashion, and Frances’ fate is directly tied to them. The little-known true story about the epidemic cover-up makes for a tragic and highly compelling backdrop against which Frances searches for her path in life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2013

    Excellent.

    Loved the characters. Riviting story. I learned some history of a very unknown place. Excellent book. A++++ JOB.

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    Posted May 18, 2013

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    Posted April 1, 2014

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    Posted June 30, 2013

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    Posted May 31, 2013

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