Customer Reviews for

Final Fantasy and Philosophy: The Ultimate Walkthrough

Average Rating 3.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted December 16, 2011

    Interesting, but sometimes biased

    I found this book for the most part to be an interesting read, and a reasonably good first stab at looking the phenomenon of Final Fantasy in depth. Unfortunately, the authors tend to allow their personal bias to restrict their view of the universality of the series. Of specific note is the section on the Shintoist influences in Final Fantasy VII. This Shinto influence is undeniable and extremely interesting, as are the influences of Buddhism and, possibly, Hinduism. However, the author goes out of his/her way to say that the game is somehow anti-JudeoChristian and anti-Western. For example, they claim the similarity between the name of the "Calamity", Jenova, and "Jehovah," indicates Japanese negativity towards western religious philosophy. However, the name Jenova could just as likely come from "gene" and "ova," in order to highlight the dangers of unethical genetic experimentation on sentient beings. They ignore the somewhat heavy-handed, but positively presented, Christian symbolism in "Advent Children," specifically in the use of an undeniably Christian-style church as Aerith's sanctuary, complete with stained glass and modified Chi-Rho above the altar. Cloud's cleansing of Denzel in the miraculous spring that rises there, in order to remove his illness or "geostigma," is also highly reminiscent of Christian baptism. Lastly, they claim the naming of Sephiroth (from the Judeo Kabbalistic tradition - sephirot) is indicative of "a potentially problematic syncretism." However, their interpretation of sephirot is not correct as I understand it - it has to do with achieving union with the divine God, not merely as "emanations of an Absolute God." The use of the name thus becomes understandable, as Sephiroth the character says he wishes to become a god. It is a pity the authors couldn't give the game creators more credit for inclusivity - using traditions that will be recognized by and appeal to a wide variety of cultural traditions. I believe the series' universality is one its greatest strengths, and this book doesn't do it justice.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    December 16

    Though I find your opinion satisfactory I hate to pint this out but could Sephiroth not be named for he fact that "sephiroth" is latin for One-winged angel? As, he has one huge wing that makes him resemble , to me at least , a fallen angel. Learn latin.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 21, 2011

    Fairly Interesting - Not as Epic as I'd Hoped

    Overall, definitely an interesting read - it gets its point across, and addresses many different philosophers and their ideas in Final Fantasy terms, which is sweet. However, some of the essays were not as well-written as others; most had some sort of subjective spin on them that they failed to address, and I counted multiple typos. Other than that, pretty interesting, though. Worth a read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    This is a hard book to read - hey, it's written mostly by studen

    This is a hard book to read - hey, it's written mostly by students and grad students in philosophy. So if you're put-off by big words, don't read it. Oh, and actually, Sephiroth is not Latin. The Latin for "one-winged angel" is "alae unius Angeli". Sephiroth isn't Latin for anything.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    To december 16

    Woah there watch the words they i couldnt understand half of what ur sayin!!!!!!!

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1