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The Final Summit: A Quest to Find the One Principle That Will Save Humanity

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Can You Answer the Question?

One of those books you want everyone around you to read--can't stop talking about it. Thought provoking. Page turner. Interesting historic themes weaved into story. Many truths. One of the few books I will keep to re-read.

posted by NotSurprised on September 7, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

The Final Summit - Not Quite the Finale

All-in-all, the read was enjoyable if you have some time to kill, but there is not much spiritual depth here. If you want to find success here on Earth, you might find some good tips in The Final Summit, but if you want to be great in the kingdom of God, you won't find ...
All-in-all, the read was enjoyable if you have some time to kill, but there is not much spiritual depth here. If you want to find success here on Earth, you might find some good tips in The Final Summit, but if you want to be great in the kingdom of God, you won't find many answers in this book.

posted by Vishaal on November 19, 2011

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  • Posted November 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Final Summit - Not Quite the Finale

    All-in-all, the read was enjoyable if you have some time to kill, but there is not much spiritual depth here. If you want to find success here on Earth, you might find some good tips in The Final Summit, but if you want to be great in the kingdom of God, you won't find many answers in this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 11, 2014

    I read The Final Summit a while back and honestly forgot all abo

    I read The Final Summit a while back and honestly forgot all about it.  It just wasn’t a book that was memorable nor engaging for me.  

    This is a fiction book about a guy named David Ponder.  Apparently there is a companion book before this one but it didn’t seem like this couldn’t stand alone.  David has been visited by Gabriel and told that God wants him to go to this meeting place and try to answer the question that will save mankind.  The answer is only two words and they get five chances to guess.  The cast of characters are somewhat interesting when you get to “talk” with Abraham Lincoln, Joan of Arc, etc.  The overall back and forth conversation just didn’t hold my attention.

    I also just couldn’t wrap my brain around a situation where God would hinge the fate of the world on a situation like this.  The premises just didn’t make sense to me and therefore I think that kept me from having the open mind that I really needed for this book.  Maybe I will come back to it one day and have a different opinion.

    This book was given to me in exchange for my honest review and thoughts.

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  • Posted October 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good, but not like the others...

    I liked his other work better than this one. Each is much like the other from a story telling, but this one was a bit harder to get into and not as much action or personal character building. Still enjoyed it.

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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    Are you looking for a fresh outlook on life?

    The Final Summit
    A Quest to Find the One Principle That Will Save Humanity
    By Andy Andrews
    Published by Thomas Nelson

    As part of a BookSneeze® registration I was given a complimentarily copy of "The Final Summit - A Quest to Find the One Principle That Will Save Humanity by Andy Andrews". In part of the agreement I was to read the book in its entirety then write a review about it.

    This story is about a man who is chosen to save humanity. He experiences visions and epiphanies that will lead him into a whole new life style. He becomes a Traveler and is the only Traveler still living. The story follows his journey to answer a very complicated question. The only way to find the answer is to look from within and look outside the box and inside the box at the same time.

    This novel was alright. I had a really hard time getting into it. Nearly half way through was when I became interested. Meeting the characters at the final summit is what caught my attention. The story was meant to be suspenseful, wondering if David will figure out what he has been asked to reveal. The author succeeded to make the readers wonder and really think about what could happen next. The elements of the story flowed together. I was surprised with the outcome of the novel. The message is heartwarming and inspiring. The author made the readers think really hard about their own lives. I would not say it challenged my faith but it made me grateful for my faith and what I do have. I would recommend this novel to others if they are looking for a refreshing look on life.

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  • Posted July 13, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Nice Book!

    The Final Summit, by Andy Andrews
    I received this book for review from the Booksneeze site, I have not read the first book with the character David Ponder (called The Traveler's Gift), but I could understand the story.
    Who ever imagined to time travel and meet historical characters? It turns out that many years of evil on earth will end because the planet will end, David, the main character, after 28 in the calm and tranquility lost his beloved wife Ellen, and to overcome his loss at the same time need to re-active to save the world, he meets an angel, which gives him only five attempts. Who will help? Answer: Joan of Arc, Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill, King David and George Washington. These brilliant minds, time travelers will help Ponder to save the planet from destruction, and it is the last chance.
    The book was certainly well written and has a beautiful motivational and inspirational message, pity they do not have a version in Portuguese.

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  • Posted June 22, 2011

    Expected More

    When I finished this book, I kind of felt like there wasn't really anything that happened. About 95% of the book happened in one room where all they did was talk. Sure they had to try to figure out how to save all of humanity, but in order to do so all of the important figures in history had to talk about the solution. I haven't read The Traveler's Gift, which was the book before this one and introduced the whole concept behind the main character being able to travel through time to meet historical people, but I think it was probably a lot more interesting than this book because things actually happened. It was cool hearing all of the history and stories of certain people, like Joan of Arc and Winston Churchill, but that was basically the entire story. I didn't feel the real weight of the situation- that if they didn't solve the riddle of how to save humanity then God would wipe out the earth with another great flood. There wasn't really any emotion or action, just people sitting around talking. So this book wasn't really "the quest" to save humanity, it was more like the discussion to save humanity.

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  • Posted June 8, 2011

    What is the key that will save humanity?

    "The Final Summit" was a little disappointing, but still a good read.

    Imagine travelling through time and meeting with hundreds of famous people from through out history. Imagine the challenge of finding one principal that will "save humanity". That was the task facing David Ponder and the other "Travelers".

    Faced with a trickling hour glass, and opportunity only to seek the advice of five of the hundreds of Travelers, the task seems overwhelming. Will they discover the principal? Who will come up with it? The book is scattered with stories from history as well as deeply thoughtful discussions. There are famous quotes and challenging ideas. There are believable characters, and an unbelievable, yet strangely believable setting. The stories and ideas are woven together to keep the reader turning the pages to see what will happen next.

    If you have your own idea about what is necessary to "save humanity", then this is a great read. Be prepared to have your ideas challenged and to be inspired to action. The main disappointment I had with this book was the emphasis on what humanity can do to save humanity. If you can accept that, then this book is definitely worth reading.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

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  • Posted June 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Not a bad read~!

    The Final Summit is the follow up novel of author, Andy Andrews, first successful literary hit, The Traveler's Gift.

    David Ponder is nearing the end of his life, his wife has recently died, leaving him lonely and miserable. At seventy four years of age, life is slowing down and there are no more surprises around the corner. Or so it would seem for the average person, however, David has a destiny to fulfill.

    One night, after another boring, routine day, David is visited by the angel Gabriel who informs him that he is to be the head of a summit for "travelers", those people in history who have shaped it, for better or worse. It seems God is not happy with humanity and wishes to end its misery, however, David and his cast of historical figures must answer one question, "What does humanity need to do, individually AND collectively, to restore itself to the pathway toward successful civilization"?

    David is allowed to converse with historical figures from history in order to come up with an answer to the question set before him. Taking advice from the likes of Winston Churchill, Joan of Arc, King David, Eric Erickson, George Washington Carver, to name a few, the group discuss hope, self-discipline, ego and other of humanities aspects. During the discussions, a huge hourglass is increasingly dripping grains of sand, when the sands have stopped, then David must provide his final answer. Will the group figure out testimony that will save humanity or will the sands of time run dry and this age with it??

    As a stand alone novel, this isn't one that works well, you truly should read the first book to get the real significance of The Final Summit. David often refers to his youth throughout the pages, in which the prequel novel was set, and if you have not read it, you will wish you had in order to understand more of the motivation of David and the characters he meets.

    The book is easy to read, good flow and often times comical in its approach. The idea is rather a neat concept and it is intelligently written. David Ponder is one of those characters that you like, he is believable in character and prose. I found the historical figures a little stiff and less believable than I would've liked. Though the mannerisms are precise, their characters prose and thoughts did not match my interpretation of them.

    As well, I would've liked a little more oomph in the outcome of the situation. The final decision of the group wasn't what I had expected and it is much easier said than done. Andy Andrews may have given a solution to a problem but without the motivation and the enabling skills, the empowerment to act, then they are just that, words. As a fiction work though, it was a unique read that I am sure most will enjoy.

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  • Posted June 2, 2011

    Surprised me

    Half way through the first chapter of "The Final Summit" by Andy Andrews I realized this was book two in a series. It took me a while to understand what in the world the characters were talking about. What "The Final Summit" really is, is a motivational book masquarading as a novel. It's set up as though all of the big names throughout history have come together to stop the demise of humanity. A number of "You can do it" statements are given and discussed by historic figures such as Joan of Arc and Abraham Lincoln. Up until the last couple of chapters I didn't enjoy this book. There was too much licence taken where the angel Gabriel was involved,(He was the one who organized this summit of characster) (Certainly this was not a christian book) and the solutions given by the characters lacked punch. By the end of the last chapter though, I felt strangely encouraged to keep doing what I know to be right and more. Could it be that just as children learn best through games, adults learn better through novels instead of self help manuals? Well, we'll see if I'm still inspired to do something great in the next few days.

    I got this book for free in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are mine.

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  • Posted June 1, 2011

    The Final Summit

    'The Final Summit', by Andy Andrews takes up from where 'The Traveler's Gift' had left off. Many years have passed since David Ponder discovered the Seven Decisions during a divine journey through time. Now 74 years old, Ponder has lost the one thing that mattered to him most: his wife, Ellen. Despite his personal and professional success, he now sits alone at the top of his 55-story high-rise contemplating the unthinkable, just as he did 28 years ago.
    However, just as things are looking their darkest, Ponder is informed through divine channels that he is needed now more than ever. Together, with the help of hundreds of his fellow Travelers, from Winston Churchill to George Washington Carver to Joan of Arc, he must work to discover the one solution that will save humanity. Time is running out, and the final summit of Travelers must work quickly to avoid dire consequences.
    The Final Summit explores the historically proven principles that have guided our greatest leaders for centuries, and how we might restore these principles in our own lives...before it's too late.

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  • Posted May 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    It's time to answer the Question.

    The time has come to answer the Question. And this is the last chance to answer it.
    "What does humanity need to do, individually and collectively, to restore itself to the pathway toward successful civilization?"
    While the man who thought he was the least prepared to lead the summit will need to submit the answer to Gabriel, he's got others who will help him - great historical figures like Joan D'Ark, Winston Churchill, and numerous others.
    This book is interesting to read because Andy describes how each figure would answer the Question. However, since I haven't read the Traveler's Gift, it is sort of hard to get into the book without knowing the background history - possible, but just hard.

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  • Posted May 13, 2011

    The Final Summit

    I am not quite sure how to review this book, The Final Summit by Andy Andrews. First of all, I was a little put off by the cover. i can't seems to bring myself to pick up the book even after receiving this book from the publisher for a while.

    I forced myself to read it nevertheless and I found the the plot is rather queer. Perhaps I am not used to this kind of book as I am more to fluff romance and simple fiction or documentary kind.

    Anyway, my lack of interest aside. The book is well written and the arrangement of the plot is acceptable. Unfortunately, this is not the kind of book that I will want to pick up the second time as I found the the story is rather hard to digest. Good book, but not my type of book.

    I rate this book 3 out of 5 stars and I received an ARC of this book from Thomas Nelson publisher for reviewing purposes. I was not compensated in any ways for writing this review.

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  • Posted May 10, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Historically Insightful

    David Ponder is called on once again to seek the principles that not only will improve his life, but will save the human race. He meets a variety of historical characters that help him brainstorm what these principles are.
    The first book, The Traveler's Gift, was interested to read, but this time around something is missing from this sequel that was in the first one. The book provides much historical insight in a fictional way to people who existed in history. It is missing a way to feel for these characters though.
    Much of the book seems like dialogue, and there is not much action. I feel a book needs some type of action because you cannot have characters sitting at a table figuring out what to do the whole time, and that is what seemed to be happening in this book. I did look forward to seeing which historical character they would encounter next, and what principle that person would share, but it was difficult to read when I always knew that what would be next was more discussion amongst the characters.
    The Traveler's Gift was a good start to this series, but The Final Summit did not live up to what the first book was. It provides good historical insight, and does stir enough interest to keep you reading, but it needs more action.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted April 25, 2011

    An entertaining short read.

    The Final Summit by Andy Andrews is the second book about David Ponder, a "Traveler." He is introduced in The Traveler's Gift where he must travel through time to find the 7 secrets of success, but each book stands on its own in a complete novel. In The Final Summit, we find David Ponder, a successful businessman, who is well loved by colleagues and employees alike, mourning for his wife. He is now 74 years old and feels his life is over. The Archangel Gabriel appears to him and tells David he must attend a grand meeting of all the Travelers because humanity's survival is at stake. They must find a two word answer that an individual or humanity as a whole can do to save the human race, as God is thinking of starting over - a la Noah and the Ark.

    I enjoyed reading this book. The other Travelers who join David Ponder in this meeting are big names from history. Andy Andrews manages to blend them well into the storyline, giving a brief synopsis of each Traveler and their contributions to the world. He tempers the tense overtones of the meeting (after all, they are trying to save the human race) with tidbits of humor, especially through Winston Churchill trying to get the best of Archangel Gabriel.

    This book just made me feel good as I was reading it. The principals put forth as the answer are all things we should incorporate into our lives in order to make ourselves better people. But, you never feel like you're being preached at. I was a little let down at the final answer. Perhaps I was expecting something a little grander, more God-like. Yet sometimes, it's the little things that make the most impact.

    I would recommend this novel whether you're a Christian or not. It's a light read, I finished in two hours. You can be entertained and learn things about your self as you go. Who doesn't need to do that?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2011

    The Final Summit

    The Final Summit by Andy Andrews was such a huge let down for me. I thought this novel was going to be a mind blower or at least be give me some insight. Sadly I received nothing but frustration and sadness. I could not wait to read this one because I was extremely impressed with all the others I have had the pleasure of reading. At least for me, others may enjoy this novel but I did not.

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  • Posted April 19, 2011

    An average Andrews read

    Thomas Nelson publishers asked me to review Andy Andrew's The Final Summit. This book is the sequel to The Traveler's Gift which I have yet to read. In this story, David Ponder, the main character gets summoned by the archangel Gabriel to attend a forum of sorts with other time travelers (people who have made a significant mark on history). At the summit, he is asked to answer a very serious question: What is the one solution that will save humanity (as a whole). He comes to the table with Winston Churchill, King David, George Washington Carver, Joan of Arc and many others in a quest for the "right" answer. David is surrounded by leadership principles that have stood the test of time and he is asked to answer an age old question. And while the answer may seem easy, the task is difficult.

    I found The Final Summit to be full of historical references and facts. It was interesting in that I learned about some famous historical figures. However, I find stories like these to be far-fetched at best. Although Andrews tries to turn The Final Summit into a profound philosophical quest, I found that the story line lagged in parts. I wouldn't necessarily recommend this book as it seem disjointed in parts and while it was an easy and quick read, I kind of had to push through it to finish it. Personally, I like Andrews's writing as a whole, especially his book The Noticer. However, I wasn't as impressed with this read. As always, feel free to form your own opinion.

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  • Posted April 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    a bit of a letdown, but entertaining nonetheless

    The Final Summit is a self-help parable that seeks to answer the question: "What does humanity need to do, individually and collectively, to restore itself to the pathway toward successful civilization?" It attempts to do so through a fictional character who finds himself at a heavenly "summit" of time "travelers" who have been brought there by the Archangel Gabriel. Most of the "travelers" are famous people who are known for great accomplishments, except for the hero of our story, a normal man who found wealth and prosperity by learning life secrets through his previous time travels.

    Unfortunately, the answers these characters come up with to the question are generally trite and obvious, such as "find hope" or "seek wisdom." I was groaning at most of these answers, thinking, "how dumb can these famous people be?" when, at each answer, they smugly assumed they had it "right."

    When the final answer was revealed, I was even more disappointed. I won't spoil it for you, but the final answer will likely leave you scratching your head. It's really anti-climatic. It's also the type of answer where, if someone follow the advice in the wrong way, they could actually make things worse. I kind of understand what he was trying to get at with the answer, but I think he could have worded it better or qualified it more.

    Along with the final answer, we are given a statement that we can use to help improve our lives. This declaration is very similar to the sorts of statements you might find in an Og Mandino book. As such, you may find it useful and inspiring.

    Despite the letdown of the final answer, I did actually enjoy the book very much and found it to be a good, light-hearted read. The exploration of each of the "wrong" answers was also interesting in that it did provide some review of the concepts and food for thought. It was also just entertaining. I would definitely read more books by the author.

    If you like the author's previous books, you might like this one. If you are new to the author, you may give this book a try. Just lower your expectations for the end and enjoy the ride.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted April 11, 2011

    The Final Summit - a book review

    I heard Andy Andrews speak at two Women of Faith events, one in Rochester and one in Nashville, so I was interested to read his latest book, The Final Summit. It is a sequel to The Traveler's Gift, which I hadn't read, but if I had, I probably wouldn't have picked this one up. It simply wasn't my style. That being said, the story itself is a story of hope. It ties great people from history together in a way that helps us see the bigger picture. Each of the great people - Winston Churchill, Abraham Lincoln, King David, to name a few - is a traveler. Travelers somehow can travel through time and also see things with a heavenly viewpoint. I would imagine that this was more fully explained in the first book. Each is called to this summit to help answer one question: What does humanity need to do, individually and collectively, to restore itself to the pathway toward successful civilization? The reader of the book learns a little history while the travelers wrestle with this question. Andy Andrews is smart, dynamic, energetic and passionate. He believes, as do I, that our destiny is linked to our history. The book ends, as his talks do, with something we can take away with us and apply to our lives. It's an easy read with great personal application. This book was sent to me through BookSneeze, a bloggers book review program. I was not required to write a favorable review.

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  • Posted April 11, 2011

    Inspirational...

    I have not read the first book of which this is a sequel to, but I took Booksneeze's offer of a free copy in exchange for review since it seems like a worthwhile read. After all, a free book from a highly-acclaimed writer should prove to be somethign. And I'm really glad I did take this book.

    It does not matter whether you have or have not read the first book. Anyone who's in need of a little spark of inspiration will surely get something out of this follow up. David Ponder's life is a living testament that when life takes a plunge, God will surely show you ways with which you can pull yourself back up.

    So what is the correct response to the very timely question of what would it take to bring humanity back to a path of success? David Ponder meets up with various personalities in history to try and find out. This book may not hand you the answers in a silver platter but it will surely give you a lot of things to think about, and eventually be enlightened as to what is our real purpose on earth. Will David Ponder be astute and sensible enough to able to figure out the answers before time run out?

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  • Posted April 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Final Summit by Andy Andrews

    Human will is corrupt. It has been ever since the forbidden bites of the forbidden fruits. But, as in the days of Noah, God is once again considering re-starting humanity. David Ponder, and all the other Travelers have the opportunity to stop that from happening, by correctly answering answering a single question. The Travelers consist of brilliant minds throughout history, including C.S. Lewis, Abraham Lincoln, and King Solomon. Sounds simple, right? Maybe it would be if not for the limitations of only five guesses, and the correct answer must be achieved before the hour glass runs out. It all comes down to the Final Summit.

    This book is very difficult to place in one genre. It is sort of a mix of fantasy, sci-fi, biographies, and inspirational. As this book is mixed genre, I also have mixed feelings about it. Overall, I liked it. It was a quick book that explores good morals and tells interesting stories. I did have a few problems with it however.

    First off, the archangel Gabriel is a main character in the book. Forgive me for my line of thought, but Muhammad also thought he was visited by Gabriel. Now I am not saying that people can't be visited by Gabriel, it is quite possible it happens. I am simply saying that nagging thought stayed in my mind. My other problem was that Gabriel spoke of a race more advanced than ours. Instantly I thought to the Garden of Eden. He then continued on about the pyramids, how we can't match them today. Then I was confused. The Isrealites, the Egyptians? Then he spoke of their architecure all over the world and them living 30,000 years ago. Now I was thinking whoa. Aliens? I can't think of what else it could be. I was very disappointed about that. Decent values if you can avoid the obstacles.

    On the plus side. I never guessed the answer.

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