Customer Reviews for

Finding Happiness in a Frustrating World

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2008

    How to Find Long-Term Happiness

    This is currently my favorite happiness book. In less than 100 pages, it offers a reader all they ever wanted to know about the subject of happiness- and then some. While some readers might be turned off by its brevity, I wasn't bothered, and in fact, appreciated it! As the insert of the book points out, "What good is a big book full of useful information if nobody ever finishes it?" Here's some specifics: <BR/><BR/>Chapter one poses the question, "Why are some people so much happier than others?" We've all met those individuals now and then that always seem to be happy all the time. What's their secret? The book will answer this by the end. <BR/><BR/>Chapter two will show you that happiness is really our ultimate pursuit and the main reason we want a lot of the things we do. For example, would you want a million dollars if you knew it couldn't bring you any happiness? Of course not, its really the happiness the money could bring you that you really want, not the money itself. <BR/><BR/>Chapter three goes into how happiness researchers go about studying happiness. Yes, its a science, and yes, it can be legitimately studied. This chapter tells you how they do it. <BR/><BR/>Chapter four is all about things that have very little to do with making a person happy. The book points out many things people waste their time on that won't ever result in long-term happiness. It also explains the process of adaptation that keeps material things from bringing people long-term happiness. The book provides a good example- was there ever a song you were just crazy about- but got sick of hearing after you played it for awhile? This same process occurs with posessions- so don't waste too much of your time trying to find happiness by acquiring more "things." <BR/><BR/>Chapter five is the opposite of Chapter four- it tells you what things have a LOT to do with determining your happiness. Here you learn all about the role of genetics, circumstances, and intentional activity. <BR/><BR/>Chapter six is probably why most people will buy the book and shows you how to find long-term happiness. It needs to be made clear here that the suggestions, as well as the step-by-step plan (which is Chapter seven), have been proven to work. The author puts a pretty big bite behind this claim by citing not one, but several controlled trials that have been published in the positive psychology literature proving that his suggestions will work for you. Without going through every detail of the plan, let me just say that it is simple to do and you can begin right after reading the book. <BR/><BR/>So, if you're looking to live a happier life, want to start concentrating your life's efforts on what will really make you happy in the long run, OR if you simply want to learn more about the science of happiness- get it. If reading this book has whetted your appetite to learn more about the vast academic and technical aspects of happiness, I suggest checking out "The Science of Subjective Well-Being". Happy trails!

    14 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 18, 2009

    Better books out there

    This book is an OK introduction to the subject, but it lacks substance or insight. There are many better books and magazine articles out there. If you are new to the subject, you will very quickly go thru this short booklet and move on to more serious books. And if you already have some knowledge of this subject, there is nothing here you don't know. Either way, skip this book.

    If you really have frustration or happiness issues, you should attend a few sessions with a therapist (a psychotherapist not a physical therapist).

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    Not life changing

    We would like to believe that a 76 page book by a layman will provide us the key to finding happiness in the world. If such a book did exist, therapists would quickly go out of business. This is not that book. The book does provide some basic information on people who are happy vs. those who are unhappy, but won't change the later into the former.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2009

    Finding Happiness in a Frustrating World

    In just a few hours, this concise little book will teach you how to find long-term happiness. How does it accomplish this lofty goal? Simply by giving the reader the ability and insight to distinguish between the things in life that bring lasting happiness, from those that merely provide temporary happiness. At the end of the book, all the concepts are pulled together into one practical, step-by-step plan that can be put into action immediately.

    Based completely on randomized controlled trials and scientific studies that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, "Finding Happiness in a Frustrating World" is a practical and efficient resource to help you keep life from driving you crazy.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2009

    Feel good but empty and uninformative

    The book will appeal to self help junkies but not to anyone serious about becoming more happy in life (and the work that takes).

    - The book is only 60 pages long, but even so, it uses a large type face. There is really only 30 pages of content which could have been edited down to 20 pages. A lot of space is taken up by rather pedestrian conversational speech.

    - 90% of the book consists of an impromptu interview taped by the author (referred to as "the young therapist") of a professor of psychology identified only as "the old professor". The interviewer asks only basic questions and the interviewee gives only basic answers. The remainder of the book rehashes things discussed earlier and provides a very simplistic step-by-step plan that is mostly common sense stuff. The end of the book contains 7 pages of references to academic material but nothing useful to the average reader.

    - The author refers to himself throughout the book as "the young therapist". This is misleading, since he is not a psychotherapist of any kind, but rather is a physical therapist with no more formal training in behavioral science than you or I.

    - All the information presented is very basic and very fluffy. A cut down version of this interview might have made an interesting magazine article, but it does not merit a book. Most of the information is already known by most people, and all of it is widely available for free on the Internet.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    The Average Person Lives 28,000 Days- Make Them Happy Ones

    Having found one of the author's other books so useful as a cardiac rehab nurse, "The Sixty-Second Motivator", I decided to read this book. Like the other one, it too is a very practical and helpful book that is based on research and is truly the best happiness book I've ever read. While I'm one of those people who are generally happy most of the time, this book explains why. Interestingly, what prompted the author, a physical therapist to investigate the science of happiness, was because he was trying to figure out how some of his patients could be so happy despite being in such poor physical shape or having a grim prognosis.

    Buy this book book if you want to become or stay happy, or if you just want to learn more about the science of happiness.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2009

    Happiness Found!

    I could go on and on about this book, but this is what I like best...

    -this book compiles all the happiness research into ONE place. And a lot of the research you can't find just anywhere.

    -it's a quick and painless read.

    -the plan that is included in the back of the book to increase happiness is based on tested research.

    I would, hands down, recommend this book- unless you don't like concise, to the point books that can really help you out.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Connecting The Dots

    While I've considered myself generally "happy" throughout my life, I must say there have been some frustrating times when I had to ask myself, "am I there yet". My attitude about happiness has always been rather complacent - a nebulous concept that either happens or doesn't happen while or after I did or got things. I don't think I consciously connected most of my goals with "happiness" but focused instead on just working to complete something. This book really changed that attitude! <BR/><BR/>After reading the book, I have come to realize that the magnifying glass on it's front cover is not merely a symbolic tool used in a spatial search for happiness, but more importantly that I needed to closely examine my concept of happiness. It showed me that in addition to the "what" or "where" happiness is, I first need to focus on the "why" of a goal or thing that I believe will give me happiness. And the author laid out a clear and logical plan for the "how". <BR/><BR/>I particularly liked the easy-going, low-key style of the book - a lot of good question and answer dialog that the author uses to clarify the concepts he presents. The chapter summary notations reinforced my understanding as I progressed through the book and it all flowed at a comfortable pace that kept me thoroughly interested throughout my reading. I also like the reference section at the end of the book. I think the author really did his homework and definitely scratched beneath the surface of the topic. For me, reading this book and practicing the step-by-step plan was kind of like scratching off one of those lotto cards and finding a clear image of happiness underneath. I found a lot of valuable information there! I highly recommend this gem of a book.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Nice introduction to the subject.

    Probably the best self help book written by a physical therapist I have read all year. The author has a nice casual writing style and touches on many subjects. I do wish the book had been longer to allow for more depth on each topic. I recommend the author's other books.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 20, 2009

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    Posted October 20, 2009

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    Posted October 20, 2009

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    Posted March 3, 2010

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    Posted August 9, 2009

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    Posted November 12, 2009

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