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Firehouse

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2008

    amazing!

    best book by far i have read in a very long time. as a volunteer firefigher on long island i live very close to new york city and very close to the fire department and many of the men who passed live right by me. this book is a great background on the people who risked their lives for the people of new york and the united states. not only were the heros but they were your negibors and your friends. i highly recommend this book to anyone is looking for an inside on the men who were heros that day and after. this book made me laugh and cry. very emontional. loved it! good bless the fire departments of the united stats and all other of it heros

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2006

    Fanastic

    Growing up, I had always imagined being a fireman just as a low salary, so-so job that i would never consider myself doing. After reading this book however, my entire veiw of Firemen has changed. This book really shows you what it really means to be a firmen and what each of the ladder 40 engine 35 men did everyday and how they risked their lives everyday for us. It brings a huge amount of respect with the book and it really lets you understand how a firemen lives his life. The book goes through each man and gives a one chapter biography of his life always ending with the 9/11 incident. It was a little slow reading, as i am used to fantasy books, but all in all, it was incredible.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2002

    Absorbing, Detailed, Intelligent Look At NYC Firemen!

    As a veteran reader of 20th century history books, I've long considered David Halberstam to be one of the best and brightest of the contemporary historians publishing today. He is also, not so coincidentally, one of the most prolific, as well, having produced a steady stream of works covering such myriad historical and cultural subjects as a study of how both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations stumbled and blundered their way into the quagmire of Vietnam to more whimsical studies of pop-cultural aspects of American life such as major league baseball and the effects of the seasons on residents of the island of Nantucket off the Massachusetts coast. In this book, "Firehouse", Halberstam focuses on a subject more timely and more local than ever before, describing the lives and death of the men and women of the local fire station a few blocks from his home on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, people who figured so fatefully in the events of last September eleventh. As Halberstam so powerfully describes, only one of the thirteen men answering the first response for assistance at the World trade center survived the events of the day. This book deals with the specific nature of that response, the natural history of that day as events unfolded, and the fate of the men as well as the aftermath of their deaths for their families, friends, fellow workers, and the community at large. One of the most admirable qualities of this superb book stems from the fact that Halberstam is a "local", someone involved and participating in the day to life of the community. Consequently, he can authoritatively describe the rich and momentous history of the firehouse itself, and the centuries of tradition and community support that made it and the community of firemen and women so important in the life of the local area. For Halberstam, the Firehouse represents a kind of large and amorphous type of informal second family both for the firefighters as well as for the more general population at large. He writes convincingly of the ways in which the inner workings of a firehouse, with its own unique and interesting traditions, routines, and complex social structure provides support and succor for the whole community, becoming a vibrant, inviting, and warm environment for all involved. At the same time, he details the ways in which all those tensions that the job itself makes unavoidable spills out and adds an edgy dynamic to the social atmosphere. He also helps us to understand just why it is that men and women with other choice and other opportunities prefer to opt for this kind of life, despite the obvious risks and dangers, despite the relatively low wages and the stress and physical demands associated with the profession. This book is somewhat of a departure for Halberstam in the sense that it one more fraught with emotional overtones than his usual subject matter. Yet when dealing with the provocatively intense subject of these thirteen souls who answered the call last September, in describing their immediate fate, the exhausting search for their bodies, and the efforts on the part of their families, both individually and collectively, to come to terms with their loss and their grief, it is hard to avoid such intensity. He also deals thoughtfully with the issue of survivor's guilty on the part of the surviving firefighters in the firehouse, and the complex ways in which their conflicting feelings of guilt and relief are being handled and discussed. Indeed, this is a riveting book, one that well deserves the wide reading it will certainly enjoy. Halberstam's treatment is so personal, so well documented, and so meticulously narrated that one finds himself swept along with the tide of events of that day last year when the world seemed to stand still, when all of us watched in horror as the massive evil manifested on that day came to full fruit. The book carries the signature trademark qualities of all of Halberstam's work, being meticulo

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2013

    Firehouse is a book about a firehouse in Manhattan, New York. T

    Firehouse is a book about a firehouse in Manhattan, New York. This is a story about 13 firefighters who would enter into the Twin Towers, and many would not return.  Most of the story is spent telling of the firehouse and how the crew bonded. Also a brief background of the fireman who lost their lives. The perspective of the parents, and wives of each fireman was also given. The author was trying to inform people about the sacrifices of the firefighters and the tragedy that occurred. The attended audience I think is teens and young adults. This is a easy read and is a heart touching story of 13 brave firefighters. 
    Background a reader needs to know is obviously about 9/11. I think anyone would understand this book. Even the younger generation who may not have been alive or remember it, but are learning of the great attack on the United States. The author doesn’t really have a main climax it’s back and forth through out the whole story. The author talks about all 13 fireman and how each loved each other as brothers. The majority of the story is about how brave each firefighter was and jobs and achievements they had done leading up to 9/11. 
    I think this was a good book, and I think it is important to read about the sacrifice people made to save complete strangers. I think the author achieved his goal of informing the people about the fireman who lost their lives on 9/11. This book shows the love the fireman had for each other and how many took huge pay cuts to stay together. If one fireman needed something done the rest would help out to get it done five times faster. This book has a sorrow approach to it when it talked about the widows and parents that had lost their loved ones. My favorite part was just the fact that this firehouse bonded so well and knew each others strengths and weaknesses. They knew their place at the firehouse, and no one thought they were better than the other. The most important thing was the love for each other the fact they knew the other guy had their back.
    I think everyone should read this book, or a book like it. Most people especially kids and teens don’t understand the sacrifices the firefighters made on 9/11. This is more of book that was written to inform instead of a book written for entertainment. Anyone who wants to learn about firefighters or 9/11 would like this book. The firefighters knew what they were getting themselves into, and they did it anyway. The ones who were going up the stairs, while everyone else was going down. They were the real heroes in 9/11 those who sacrifice their life for someone else’s. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    What it takes to become a true live hero. Firehouse was a boo

    What it takes to become a true live hero.
    Firehouse was a book that told the story of firemen that lived together in a firehouse that was engine 40 ladder 35.But when the day 9/11 came 13 of them went to the help with the problem and only 1 came back alive. This book was not just about 9/11 and what happened to the 13 firemen of the house and what they did only that night. it was the stories of what the firemen had done and there family’s. How they got to the firehouse and how others saw them as people and what they do to become a fireman. This book was all the memories of being a firemen and what people and there family’s what others to remember about them before 9/11.You even got to hear some of the stories that changed some of the firemen’s lives of what happened. Having been a daughter of a firemen and hearing some stories about calls and them reading about others they still hit you hard. Two of the stories that where told where one the men was acting different then he normally dose and when his wife asked what was wrong that’s when he told her this story “he had been on a fire in the Bronx up around the grand concourse and 190th Street, And the engine had gotten to the fire a little slower than it should have, john believed. He was assigned to the back of an apartment house, and arrived just as a young woman of perhaps eighteen or twenty had panicked and jumped for an upper floor. What made it so painful was that her situation had not been that perilous; she had had more than enough time, if she had held steady .but she was young and scared,…..” a second firefight in the book that was his brother was “Sure enough, Bob Ginley had been on a fire in which he had had to carry out the burned body of a child, a child they had just missed saving” both of the stories had left images in my mind just like when my dad would tell me stories. These stories are what I call one minute earlier stories because most of the time they feel like if they were only one minute earlier they could have saved the people. This book tells more than just what firemen do it tells what happens in between the calls. What happens with the family before and after some of the hardest calls that they get called on. How should I end this it’s hard to writ because everyone can take thing form this book so read and find out what knowledge you can get for this book about firemen and the true emotions of what it takes to become a true live hero?



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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    Excellent Inside Story

    Want to know the definition of heroism? Read this poignant book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2010

    Firehouse

    I enjoyed this book. It was well researched and a very interesting read. Although the theme of the book was about 911, the book centered on the lives of some of the fireman that died that day. Instead of dwelling on how they died, it talked about how they lived! Very inspirational.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2008

    amazing

    im a 15 year old girl and i thought this book was amazing. i literaly read it and im now signing up for the volunteers. living so close it was weird hearing about this.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2003

    Firehouse, a hero's story

    I originally bought this book for my husband who is a firefighter in Plano, Texas. I had heard about it when the author was interviewed on our local news and it caught my attention. At the time, I thought it would be something that he would be interested in but I never realized the impact it would have on me. We all watched with horror on 9/ll or in my case listened for I was at work in a doctors office and we had no tv. My first thought that day was to go get my three children, my husband was also working and my mom was keeping my children. I called her when I heard about the first plane hitting the WTC. She was watching events unfold at the time and saw the second plane hit. We'll never forget the sheer awfulness of that day and the fear of what would happen next. That night when I got home I had to deal with my kids, especially my 11year old son, he had waited all day to talk to me and had felt real fear that something would happen in our city also. Later, I got the chance to actually see , over and over again the buildings fall and the knowledge of the of the people inside. As hard as that was, it was the loss of the firefighters and police, etc that was even more difficult to deal with. They were there by choice, even though I'm sure they were afraid and wanted to go the other way, the firefighters always do their job regardless of the risk to themselves. When I read this book I came to know these men and their families, I understood how awful it was for their families, friends and other firefighters who had to wait and wonder if they would be found and pray that they didn't suffer . I've never personally known a firefighter who has died in the line of service but after this book I feel like I've known and respected many. There are obviously many others who died that day and I know that even though their names aren't listed in Firehouse their souls and hearts are included. I passed this book on to my niece to read also, she was moving to Pa. and was planning to visit NYC. She was also very moved. I am planning a trip to visit her in 10 days and we will visit NYC, this will definitely include a visit to engine 40, ladder 35.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2002

    Eye-opening and Heart-wrenching

    A dear friend of my family is one of the wonderful men spoken of in this book but due to the fact that the loss of him has been so hard to talk about this book has helped answer a lot of questions. This book shed light on aspects of that day I may never have learned about on the evening news. The author writes a real page-turner. At one point your laughing and the next you can't stop crying. Even the stories of men I had never known hit you in the gut. This book gives you a peek at the families and what they went through that terrible morning. You learn to love these guys as even more than just firemen, as husbands, fiances, dads, sons, brothers. I loved it and you will too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2002

    Understands the Bonds Between Firefighters

    The author understands the life of firefighters inside and outside the fire station. He details the amount of effort persons extend themselves to become a part of the fire fighting profession. Whether you are a volunteer or career firefighter, you will understand it takes a certain person to do what we do.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2002

    AN APPROPRIATELY REVERENTIAL READING

    Actor/director/writer Mel Foster gives an appropriately subdued and reverential reading of the story of Engine 40, Ladder 35 and the firemen who lost their lives on a day America will never forget - September 11, 2001. As Frank McCourt commented, 'If you have tears, prepare to shed them.' I would add you may have difficulty stopping those tears. In this particular firehouse, which was dealt the most severe blows following the terrorist attack on the World Trade Towers, as in other firehouses the men live, work and eat together. Halberstam writes: '....they play sports together, go off to drink together, help repair one another's houses andmost importantly, share terrifying risks; their loyalties to each other must, by the demands of the dangers they face, be instinctive and absolute.' Few could have dreamed of the danger in store. On that terrible morning two rigs carrying a total of 26 men left the firehouse; only 14 men would return. We are with the families as they wait for news of their loved ones and, in part, come to understand why men undertake such a perilous profession. 'Firehouse' is history, a moving narrative of an earth shattering day.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2002

    A very moving tribute to the heroes lost on 9/11...

    I heard from my cousin that this book was fantastic and at first I hesitated to read it because I knew it was also extremely sad. I am so glad that I read it. The stories of each man and their families are stories that need to be told. They are truly heroes in every sense of the word.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2002

    Magnificent

    'Firehouse' is wonderful. It's as simple as that. A herioc story that depicts the life of a fireman, or firewoman, and the dangers that come with the job. A great book for any type or reader. It grabs the readers attention and doesn't want to let it go. Even if it doesn't seem like your type of book it is. But if you want to make sure, read part of hte first chapter here at BN.com

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