Customer Reviews for

First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2004

    Touches on some very important points

    Overall, the book is a pretty good read. Among other things, I especially enjoyed the discussion about focusing on the strengths of employees and finding the right fit for them. An employee who is mediocre at one job function can excel in another position. This is something that very few other management books discuss even though it is an extremely important principle. I did have a problem with a few things the authors said. I personally don¿t believe that good managers consistently violate the golden rule. This gives readers the impression that good managers don¿t care about treating people well and I don¿t think that¿s true. Also, the authors recommend that managers should spend most of their time with good employees since they are the ones who are getting things done. Although I understand the point they are trying to make, they never said that unproductive behavior should be confronted. It¿s almost as if they are suggesting that poor employees should be ignored. If an employee always shows up late, makes mistakes, and doesn¿t work well with others, is ignoring the problem the best thing to do? I believe that the best managers tactfully confront the behavior, give the employee a fair chance to improve, and then replace them with a much better employee if things don¿t change. In addition, the section on ¿The Art of Interviewing for Talent¿ is bothersome. A list of ¿good interview questions¿ always has to be taken with a huge grain of salt. The reason is simple: people can lie. Anybody who has done a lot of interviews knows that there are people who can say all the right things in an interview and still end up being a dud. Please keep this in mind! Aside from these issues, the book is very solid. I¿d recommend checking it out. Greg Blencoe Author, The Ten Commandments for Managers

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2007

    Good, sound advice

    As a technical recruiter specializing in electronics engineers and technical sales and marketing people I am constantly reinforcing with my hiring managers the need to recruit for talent, not just experience. I can't overemphasize that the person who does the best job is the person who is doing what he does best! Along these same lines, my advise to the job seeker is to find something you LIKE to do, not what pays the most money. If you like what you're doing the money will follow.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2007

    Definately a good read!

    This book pointed out many different aspects of dealing with employees on the job. This book re-iterates a few things, but I think its meant to show its importance. I especially like the part where it talks about focusing on peoples strengths instead of always trying to improve their weaknesses. I also liked the part where it talks about how you cant be taught talent and that 'talent' is a characeterstic that comes naturally...some people have it and some don't.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2002

    Jumps at you

    Okay, now what is that one thing that jumps out at you? You must manage differently. Good advice anytime!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2001

    But first you have to know the rules

    This book offers some fantastic insights. The only real issue I have is its overall positioning. I think it's silly to say you must first break all the rules. the first thing you must do is learn all the rules that apply to you, and then decide which ones you need to break. For example there were a lot of .com companies who thought they could break the rules, or that, for some magic reason, that basic business rules didn't apply to them. And look where it got them! Into bankruptcy. However, Buckingham and Coffman DO make a good case that you can't allow yourself to be boxed in by a certain mindset if you want to advance quickly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2001

    Sage Advice, but We Must Also Break This Rule!

    There is much good advice in this book, especially with respect to identifying the outstanding people with talents. But, from a great deal of personal experience, I would like to recommend that we should all break one more very important rule: the 'Stiff-faced Rule', so as not to become a 'humorless, self-absorbed bore of a manager'! Laughing at mis-management and listening to those who report to you can be a great morale booster to all empolyees. If you are ready and willing to break the counterproductive, 'Stiff-faced Rule', try reading something with sharp wit, like the hilarious high-tech satire, 'Management by Vice'. Share it with those, who report to you! You'll earn their respect! So, be brave! We owe it to ourselves and good working relations with our employees to make sure we break every rule in this book and this one in addition!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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