Customer Reviews for

Flags of Our Fathers

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Flags of our Fathers

This book retells the renowned story of the six flag raisers on Iwo Jima. They were six simple American boys who were trying to make a difference by fighting in WWII to defend their homes. When the boys were young they didn't know each other, but when heat of war began ...
This book retells the renowned story of the six flag raisers on Iwo Jima. They were six simple American boys who were trying to make a difference by fighting in WWII to defend their homes. When the boys were young they didn't know each other, but when heat of war began on Iwo Jima, they soon became brothers for the rest of their lives. They all knew each other and tried to watch over each other during battle. Throughout the book, you learn about all of the challenges that they faced and how they overcame. They grew up apart, but they became one and went down in history together. Throughout this book there is a lot of heartache, but all of the soldiers learn to overcome this pain through unity. Every single soldier learns from day one that everything is about unity. Nothing works as well if it is just an individual. The best success comes from working together and trusting the ones around you. Without your team mates you might end up dead and everyone knew that their brothers needed help just as much as they did. They could always count on each other and always trusted one another. The part that I liked most about this book was the heroic tales. The story of the flag rising on Iwo is a very popular story, but a lot of times you do not hear about what went on before these six boys had the chance to raise this flag. This battle was all about who had more guts and who was willing to go the farthest and sacrifice the most to achieve their goal. Young American men would throw their bodies on live grenades just to save lives. They all knew that the death of one was much better than the loss of twenty. Every single American was fighting for the same things and knew that they would do what they had to do in order to win the war. One thing I didn't like about this book was it was so long. You can't really change that though because you need all that information to be able to know what's going on. I also liked how much detail James Bradley put into this book. I felt like I was there and watching it happen. I couldn't imagine what those soldiers went through when they got home. Seeing that many soldiers die would be traumatic. I thought it was amazing that he got all this information by going around the country looking for people who knew the six flag raisers and then writing a book about it. I believe that someone could easily pick this book up and start reading it because it tells the storey that we all know about, but not in great detail, which is where this novel comes in to fill the gaps. When looking for a book along the same lines as Flags of our Fathers you can pick up Flyboys also written by James Bradley. I would give the book an overall 4.5 stars out of 5 solely because it can get long and dry, but quickly then makes up for it by bringing you back into the heat of battle.

posted by TylerMcCluskey on February 9, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Awesome

My brother wanted this book so bad so my dad got it for him. I was sitting playing angry birds then i got bored and clicked flags of our father. I started to read it.... it was so intersing. GET IT IT IS SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO...
My brother wanted this book so bad so my dad got it for him. I was sitting playing angry birds then i got bored and clicked flags of our father. I started to read it.... it was so intersing. GET IT IT IS SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO GOOD? I PROMISE YOU. But don't get it if you don't want to thats just my opinom.

posted by 6132730 on November 25, 2011

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  • Posted February 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Flags of our Fathers

    This book retells the renowned story of the six flag raisers on Iwo Jima. They were six simple American boys who were trying to make a difference by fighting in WWII to defend their homes. When the boys were young they didn't know each other, but when heat of war began on Iwo Jima, they soon became brothers for the rest of their lives. They all knew each other and tried to watch over each other during battle. Throughout the book, you learn about all of the challenges that they faced and how they overcame. They grew up apart, but they became one and went down in history together. Throughout this book there is a lot of heartache, but all of the soldiers learn to overcome this pain through unity. Every single soldier learns from day one that everything is about unity. Nothing works as well if it is just an individual. The best success comes from working together and trusting the ones around you. Without your team mates you might end up dead and everyone knew that their brothers needed help just as much as they did. They could always count on each other and always trusted one another. The part that I liked most about this book was the heroic tales. The story of the flag rising on Iwo is a very popular story, but a lot of times you do not hear about what went on before these six boys had the chance to raise this flag. This battle was all about who had more guts and who was willing to go the farthest and sacrifice the most to achieve their goal. Young American men would throw their bodies on live grenades just to save lives. They all knew that the death of one was much better than the loss of twenty. Every single American was fighting for the same things and knew that they would do what they had to do in order to win the war. One thing I didn't like about this book was it was so long. You can't really change that though because you need all that information to be able to know what's going on. I also liked how much detail James Bradley put into this book. I felt like I was there and watching it happen. I couldn't imagine what those soldiers went through when they got home. Seeing that many soldiers die would be traumatic. I thought it was amazing that he got all this information by going around the country looking for people who knew the six flag raisers and then writing a book about it. I believe that someone could easily pick this book up and start reading it because it tells the storey that we all know about, but not in great detail, which is where this novel comes in to fill the gaps. When looking for a book along the same lines as Flags of our Fathers you can pick up Flyboys also written by James Bradley. I would give the book an overall 4.5 stars out of 5 solely because it can get long and dry, but quickly then makes up for it by bringing you back into the heat of battle.

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Flags of our Fathers A tale of the greatest generation of American

    The memoir Flags of our Fathers, which spent 46 weeks on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list by James Bradley, was, in my opinion, a great book. It is not a regular memoir in, but it is a snapshot of an important part of the lives of the people involved. It was pieced together by the author using journals, diaries, pictures, records, and the accounts of eyewitnesses and family members. The Author is not actually part of the story, but the events and facts are true. The book was about the six flag raisers on Iwo-Jima made immortal by the famous photograph taken by Joe Rosenthal. The book tells the story of these inspirational men, and specifically John Bradley, the author's father.
    WWII was a war with many remarkable and savage battles, but few match the battle of
    Iwo-Jima. Iwo-Jima is an 8 square mile island controlled by Japan, when the U.S attacked, the Japanese fortified the island and swore not to give ground. The fighting conditions were terrible for the marines and morale was low, however, several U.S marines climbed mount Surabachi, a center point of Japanese resistance, and raised an American flag for all to see. The event was captured forever by Joe Rosenthal, who took a photo of the six men hoisting the flag together. The book tells the tale of each of these men's journey in the battle, as they experience the horrors of war in the pacific theater, the brutal part of WWII that took place in the sandy beaches and steaming jungles of the pacific islands, and how they deal with the brutality around them, as described by John Bradley talking about his friend, "The Japanese took him underground and tortured him.it something I've always tried to forget." Several of them simply could not deal with the sights they saw and the things they did, sinking into depression or become dependant on alcohol. Only one man lived a long, untroubled life, and that was by completely locking up the memories of that traumatic chapter of his life, never speaking of it or making public appearances after the war bond drives. This is part of the message of the book: War is a terrible thing, and it affects people very seriously. I would recommend this book to some seventh graders but not all due to the strong violent content.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2006

    Great Reading

    This is US History at it's best. This book is about true American's are made of. Nuff said!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2006

    Powerful, Hard To Put Down

    'Flags of Our Fathers' is one of the most moving novels I have ever read on the subject of World War Two. As a fan of European Theatre battles, I had no idea what I would get into when I bought this book. 'Flags of Our Fathers' touched me like no war novel has ever done. From the beginning chapters to the very end, I found myself glued to the book, finding it difficult to put down. James Bradley should be very proud and honored by the actions of his father and the many men who fought and died to keep this country free. I only wish that I had read this novel sooner.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 17, 2011

    Glad to have read this book.

    Written by a son of one of the flagraisers and yet he did not glorify those 6. This book is true to the core.

    To all those who fight for our country, thank you for your bravery.

    Saepe Expertus. Semper Fidelis.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Review for Flags of our Fathers

    It was only a replacement flag, but became the flag in the most famous photograph in history. Flags of Our Fathers begins in 1998, when James Bradley, son of one of the flag-raisers, travels to Iwo Jima to post a memorial to his father, John Bradley. But where the story truly begins is on a cold February day in 1945. Two days after the Marines landed on Iwo Jima, one of the bloodiest battles of World War II, five Marines and one Navy Corpsman placed a replacement flag on top of Mt. Suribachi.
    The photographer, Joe Rosenthal, wasn't even sure he got the photograph. He wouldn't know for weeks because the film would need to be air-lifted to Hawaii for processing before it was sent back to the States. The photo itself was only of the replacement flag anyway. The commander of the Marine force had ordered the original flag replaced because the Secretary of the Navy wanted it. The commander felt it belonged to the Marines. What happened next would stun the flag-raisers who survived. Days later the photo would circulate the globe, announcing that the Marines had taken Iwo Jima even though the battle had barely begun. For a nation tired of war, this didn't matter. The photo gave them hope, a hope they desperately needed to continue the war. Only three of the flagraisers would survive the battle; three died within days of raising the new flag.

    Major Messages and Themes: It is also a very human story. It's a very personal story of how human beings learn to cope with the most horrific events imaginable. While one of these men seeks further fame for his role in the picture, the two remaining survivors struggle to return to "life as normal". Post Traumatic Stress Disorder wasn't a term these survivors knew. They struggled in silence to deal with horrors they couldn't understand.

    I liked the book in that it was a true story in what these men had to do for their country and how they had to go through all of the horrors that were on Iwo Jima, everyone who likes to learn about history or just want a good read should read this book to have a good reading experience. My overall rating i would say this book is a 9 out of 10.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2012

    Abby

    I have never read it

    1 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 24, 2009

    Flags of our Fathers

    This book retells the renowned story of the six flag raisers on Iwo Jima. They were six simple American boys who were trying to make a difference by fighting in WWII to defend their homes. When the boys were young they didn't know each other, but when heat of war began on Iwo Jima, they soon became brothers for the rest of their lives. They all knew each other and tried to watch over each other during battle. Throughout the book, you learn about all of the challenges that they faced and how they over came. They grew up apart, but they became one and went down in history together. Throughout this book there is a lot of heartache, but all of the soldiers learn to over come this pain through unity. Every single soldier learns form day one that everything is about unity. Nothing works as well if it is just an individual. The best success comes from working together and trusting the ones around you. Without your team mates you might end up dead and everyone knew that their brothers needed help just as much as they did. The could always count on each other and always trusted one another. The part that I liked most about this book was the heroic tales. The story of the flag raising on Iwo is a very popular story, but a lot of times you do not hear about what went on before these six boys had the chance to raise this flag. This battle was all about who had more guts and who was willing to go the farthest and sacrifice the most to achieve their goal. Young American men would throw their bodies on live grenades just to save lives. They all knew that the death of one was much better than the loss of twenty. Every single American was fighting for the same things and knew that they would do what they had to do in order to win the war. They would not let anyone or anything stand in their way. Personally I loved the book, but I did have one dislike. At points, the book was hard to follow. It seemed to jump around a lot and it was hard to get a grasp on when what they were talking about happened. All of the events were very thought catching, but it could be hard to understand if you were to get lost. I think this book is be very educational. For someone that is not completely sure about what happened on Iwo Jima, this book could help clear up anything that you are confused about. The only reason someone might not want to read this book is because of some of the gruesome depictions. Another book that is good and very closely related to this book is "Letters from Iwo Jima". This book tells the same story, but it is from the Japanese point of view. Overall I would give Flags of our Fathers a five star rating for its excellent ability to keep the reader interested.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2008

    Flags of Our Fathers is Amazing

    This story brings to life the truth of the flagraising on Iwo Jima. It tells the struggles of the six young men who were captured in a moment in time. How thier lifes seemed to be under the rule of this image that was sadly mistaken by the people of America. It shows how an action can be totally miscontrued by the viewers. Iliked this book because it shows the real stuggles of real people.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2007

    A Flag and the Fighting men of this battle

    Having been born and raised in Wausau, Wisconsin I never knew we had such an outstanding man such as John Bradely living here. The book is not just about his life, the battle, and the aftermath but of a son's discovery of his father who he always saw as a great man. I would say this is a MUST READING for any one in Wisconsin. I can't begin to tell you how it has affected my life and outlook at the war in the pacific. And I also love historical movies/books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2014

    Note from the author of blood of Iwo jima

    Like this im starting a book at britian res one. Called sniper in berlin. It is about a german sniper in the battle of berlin.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2014

    Blood of Iwo Jima chapter two part one. Chas of war. First chapter is res 8

    They all jump out of the left side of the D.U.C.K. and sprint up the shoreline. They dive onto a sandbar littered with alive and de.ad american bodies. Barkley has a M1-Carbine, Tucker with a Thompson sub machinegun, Thompson with a Browning 30 cal. heavy machinegun, everyone else with M1-Grands. Bullets are fling in every direction. Spider holes and machine gun nests on the beach. Snipers from the left and right. Artillary positions in Mount Sarabachi. The american troops returning fire in all derictions. Barkley after his mag ran out grabbed a grenade from his belt and pulled the pin. Aiming for a machine gun nest he chucked the grenad but it hit the ground short but then it bounced striaght into the hole and all three of the machine gunners in side instantly stopped fireing. Wheeeeeeeeeee BOOM! A artuallary shell truck the groud barely missing its own Jap machine gun nest by 10 feet. "Cover me I'm going in that crater!" A man with a flamethrower shouts as he springs up and gets inti a all out sprint while bullets are wizzing past hime. Then he dives in and rolls on his back catching his breathe. "Barkley on the count of three we are going in that crater to help that guy out," Tucker ordered. "ONE!" They both change theor mags discarding their old ones. "TWO!" They get into a squat ready to spring up and sprint at three. "THREEEEEEEEE!" They shoot up and take off dumping their mags in no general direction. They div in roll on their backs and change their mags. "I'm Sargent Loius Tucker and that is Private First Class James Barkley,Tucker says. "Private First Class John Hartley," the man with the flamethrower says. "The only man left in my platoon the res are de.ad back there at that sand bar." Then Barkley notices a man with a flamethrower and three rifle men sprint in their direction. They got half way before the flamethrower man was struck in the che.ast with a machinegun bul.let and it wen straight through him and the gas tank blowing up the gas tank sending him and the ri.fle m.en into a b.all of fir.e. "Hey Hartley how about you use that flamethrower of yours to take out this machine gun nest above our heads." Tucker says. "I guess your right," Hartley said and they rolled up on their bellies. Then a machine gunner stopped fireing (to reload) and they all sprang up Barkley and Tucker surpressing fire while hartley is torching the nest no one but one Japaneese escaped the machinegun nest but that was only to be s.hot in the ba.ck amd fall down his cor.spe left burning. Then Barkley notices the first "Water Buffalo" hit the beach. It's machine guns spraying fire into the Japaneese machie gun nests with their machine guns. A water buffalo is a armoured vehiclle and landing craft with a open top. The water bullfalo has a 50 cal. and 30 cal browning heavy machineguns mounted on the top.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2014

    I loved learning about Iwo Jima and the 6 Flag raisers

    I was alway curious aout the famous statue, photograph and act of these soldiers in WW II. It's well written (aside from the author slipping into 1st person now and then) and if you enjoy learning bout critical, historical events, this book won't dissapoint.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2014

    BLUE FLAG

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2014

    At first when I started reading Flags of our Fathers, it was so

    At first when I started reading Flags of our Fathers, it was somewhat difficult to get attached to the story line.
     However once I started learning about the real men behind the faces in the photograph, I really enjoyed it.  
    Some parts in the book were complicated to follow considering that the book is about six different men, and
    you have to figure out how to keep track of all six of them.  In addition, since this story is about war and battles,
    I had trouble keeping track of all of the captains, colonels, sergeants, lieutenants, etc.  I am personally not
    acquainted with these different titles as much, so it most likely depends on the level of interest and knowledge
     a reader has in that field.I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in history,
     particularly World War II.  Even though this book has some blood and gore, I think it is definitely worth the read.
     I would not necessarily recommend it to anyone below the eighth grade, just from the fact that it might be difficult
     for someone below that age to read and understand.  I also wouldn’t recommend it to a person below that age
     because the violence might be a little overwhelming.  I think this would be an appropriate book for high school
     students because it is very applicable to what we learn in world history.  For example, just this past unit in
    history we learned about World War II, including the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Guadalcanal, and
     The Battle of Iwo Jima.  All of these events were mentioned, and The Battle of Iwo Jima provided the setting for
     Flags of our Fathers.  I know some students would be resistant to reading a book required for school, however
     high school students that do have an interest in history and World War II would really enjoy it.  Although, when
     reading this book you have to be very diligent and pay close attention to details in order to follow the story line.
      Overall, I found Flags of our Fathers to be a very interesting and enjoyable book.  Despite the fact that it does
     have its flaws, as every book does, I thought it was well written and James Bradley accomplished his goal.  The
     six boys in this photograph are now known and “alive” to me.  After reading this book I now have an even
     stronger respect for all of the men and women that serve our country and sacrifice their lives for our freedom.
    Abbie M.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    Great book

    Got it for my husband for Christmas. He reads when he can & says so far he likes it. Can't wait for him to finish so I can check it out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    Great history

    Full of drama and facts. All americans should read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2013

    Flags of our of our fathers

    I am a wwll vet readlng many war books this is a great one

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  • Posted June 14, 2013

    Great Book, Gave the feeling of being there.

    Flags of our Fathers was well written, James a and Ron, nailed it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2013

    The Japanese word ¿Iwo Jima¿ means ¿Sulfur Island¿ in English. T

    The Japanese word “Iwo Jima” means “Sulfur Island” in English. The island is known to the Japanese to have a sulfuric smell.
     In American culture, however, Iwo Jima is known for the decisive battle in the War of the Pacific. The memoir, Flags of our Fathers, written
     by James Bradley, is an intriguing book, as it relays a story not known to many that is behind a very famous picture. This book tells the
    story of the six men who raised the flag up on top of Mount Suribachi on the small island of Iwo Jima. Five of the young men were
    infantrymen for the United States Marine Corps, while the sixth was a Navy Corpsman, or battlefield medic. The six soldiers did not know
     each other until that one moment when the flag was snapped into position and Joe Rosenthal snapped the photograph. That photo
     became iconic and was the face of the Seventh Bond Tour. James Bradley uses strong vocabulary to relate the horrors of war to the
     average person. I enjoyed this book because it tells the story of an iconic American image. The book is carries no biases, even though
     the author’s father, John Bradley, was one of the flag raisers. The author tells the story of the flag raisers with gratitude and respect for all
     of those who gave their time and services, not just the ones who help raise a flag. The author uses emotion to help bring the cost of war
     home. This is a great book for adults and young adults, because the author uses a diverse vocabulary and a complex sentence structure.
     It would also be great for anyone who wants to learn more about the Battle of Iwo Jima.

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