Customer Reviews for

Fool

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

Paying homage in a cheeky way to the Bard

In 1288, King Lear of Britain decides to divide his kingdom into three monarchies run by each of his daughters. Who inherits what will be determined by Lear based on whom he perceives loves him the most. His best friend and most loyal subject the Earl of Kent warns hi...
In 1288, King Lear of Britain decides to divide his kingdom into three monarchies run by each of his daughters. Who inherits what will be determined by Lear based on whom he perceives loves him the most. His best friend and most loyal subject the Earl of Kent warns him he is acting the fool with this proposition; for his honesty he is exiled from the nation.

His eldest daughters Goneril and Regan constantly flatter him and tell him how much each loves him; their ducal spouses also go out of their way to cajole their father-in-law. His youngest child unmarried with suitors Princess Cordelia refuses to sweet-talk her dad with blatant lies; instead she is honest and sincere with him refusing to exaggerate her love. Irate with Cordelia, Lear leaves her nothing; instead he splits the kingdom between Goneril and Regan. However, as King Lear descends into madness, his decision leads to murder and war.

Paying homage in a cheeky way to the Bard, Christopher Moore¿s take on the classic King Lear play is a brilliant mix of bawdry bedroom-bathroom comedy with a tragic novel in five acts. The story is told by the one person who knows everything that is going on because as the FOOL everyone except the apprentice FOOL Drool assumes subconsciously that Pocket is too stupid to understand court intrigue by the royals and the retinue. Well written and entertaining, Mr. Moore captures the essence of Lear in this fine rendition that is summed up by mentioning the rationale for having a ghost is simply ¿there¿s always a bloody ghost¿.

Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on December 10, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Not Fooled

I am a true fan of Christopher Moore. I have not read a scrap from him that I didn't like - now wait - love! But, Fool left me a bit ill. It was forced, unfunny and not up to Moore's standards for wittiness. Possibly if you are a non-fan you may enjoy this story of a co...
I am a true fan of Christopher Moore. I have not read a scrap from him that I didn't like - now wait - love! But, Fool left me a bit ill. It was forced, unfunny and not up to Moore's standards for wittiness. Possibly if you are a non-fan you may enjoy this story of a court jester that is written in a Shakespearean tongue. But, I couldn't get past the characters lack of inspiration. Fool revolves around a jester, Pocket, who is no real fool. Where the interesting use of words - to imply a curse word - is lost the boring story line and characters take over. Not worth my time.

posted by scovel on July 18, 2009

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  • Posted December 10, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Paying homage in a cheeky way to the Bard

    In 1288, King Lear of Britain decides to divide his kingdom into three monarchies run by each of his daughters. Who inherits what will be determined by Lear based on whom he perceives loves him the most. His best friend and most loyal subject the Earl of Kent warns him he is acting the fool with this proposition; for his honesty he is exiled from the nation.<BR/><BR/>His eldest daughters Goneril and Regan constantly flatter him and tell him how much each loves him; their ducal spouses also go out of their way to cajole their father-in-law. His youngest child unmarried with suitors Princess Cordelia refuses to sweet-talk her dad with blatant lies; instead she is honest and sincere with him refusing to exaggerate her love. Irate with Cordelia, Lear leaves her nothing; instead he splits the kingdom between Goneril and Regan. However, as King Lear descends into madness, his decision leads to murder and war.<BR/><BR/>Paying homage in a cheeky way to the Bard, Christopher Moore¿s take on the classic King Lear play is a brilliant mix of bawdry bedroom-bathroom comedy with a tragic novel in five acts. The story is told by the one person who knows everything that is going on because as the FOOL everyone except the apprentice FOOL Drool assumes subconsciously that Pocket is too stupid to understand court intrigue by the royals and the retinue. Well written and entertaining, Mr. Moore captures the essence of Lear in this fine rendition that is summed up by mentioning the rationale for having a ghost is simply ¿there¿s always a bloody ghost¿.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    11 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Not Fooled

    I am a true fan of Christopher Moore. I have not read a scrap from him that I didn't like - now wait - love! But, Fool left me a bit ill. It was forced, unfunny and not up to Moore's standards for wittiness. Possibly if you are a non-fan you may enjoy this story of a court jester that is written in a Shakespearean tongue. But, I couldn't get past the characters lack of inspiration. Fool revolves around a jester, Pocket, who is no real fool. Where the interesting use of words - to imply a curse word - is lost the boring story line and characters take over. Not worth my time.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Rosencrantz & Guildenstern meet Forrest Gump

    Lear is not my favorite Shakespeare play, and I've only ever seen a few productions (haven't read it), so I went into this story kind of blindly. About midway throught the book, I thought to myself that I'd like to read the play. But then I skipped forward to the author's notes and realized that I really didn't need to.
    Mr. Moore has taken the story of Lear and shifted the perspective of the reader so that we see the story through the minor player The Fool (and what a vulgar fool!). He is the Forrest Gump of the story, but whereas Gump stumbled through history unknowingly tangled in the strings of fate, Moore's fool manipulates those same strings like a master puppeteer.
    Fool is extremely funny (the kind of book that causes the reader to receive strange looks from people because of the sudden bursts of laughter [yeah, I kind of worry my family sometimes]). Maybe I will read the original afterall, then reread Fool.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 16, 2009

    Rude...yes...FUNNY...YES!

    I can understand a few people being put off by this book as there's no getting around the fact that it is indeed filled with foul language, potty talk, and sex. So flat out, if that is something you either find childish, not funny, or offends you, DO NOT READ this book. However, if you aren't offended by that type of stuff, this book is a very ingenious trip through the King Lear world. Did I mention it was funny? This is one of the funniest books I've read in a long time. Carl Hiaasen books are a favorite of mine and I haven't laughed this hard since reading his stuff. Christopher Moore takes all sorts of parts and pieces from Shakespeare to build the story of King Lear from the point of view of his jester named Pocket. Pocket is smart, very smart and very funny. It's almost like a Monty Python bit at times which isn't a bad thing at all.

    I'll end by saying that I haven't enjoyed a book as much in a long time and while it's going to be a love hate type of deal from person to person, this book is pure genius in my mind and funny as hell! I agree with the other review that says listening to the book is a great idea in this case as it's just a brilliant performance and really adds to it all with all the different voices he does for the characters. So not for the prude or faint of heart or those who just don't like potty / sex humor, but for everyone else, it's a hoot.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 28, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Moore fans rejoice!

    For those of you familiar with Christopher Moores brand of humor, you're in for a treat. Gone are the foggy San Franscico street settings of his previous novels, instead, you're a plunked into the world of King Lear, and just like "Lamb", previous departure from familiar characters, Moore adds his own brand of twisted humor to one of Shakespeares most devistating tragedies. While not as engaging as Lamb, or as formidible in scope, it's a satisfying read and one that will leave you laughing. Although the humor is much more scatalogical then his other books.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    don't waste your time

    this book isn't very well written, nor is it engaging.
    i thoroughly enjoyed lamb, but this book is trifling and boring.

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2013

    Harriet klausner

    Here she goes again. Ruining another book with her cliff note book report. Bn, please ban this obnoxious poster already. She continuouly reveals every detail of the book, including the ending, she is the absolute worst plot spoiler here, and that is saying a lot. Please ban her and delete all her plot spoiling posts.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Wonderful

    Wonderful, vulgar, and plenty of laughs. First book by Christopher Moore, enjoyed it very much.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2009

    Not recommended

    This book on tape lasted about 5 minutes. I did not find it funny, just in bad taste. I bought this on a recommendation from salesperson. It was suppose to be a light comedy. Not.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 7, 2009

    Fools Rule

    All at once this book is fun and funny. Who knew fools had so much to say?! Moore has taken bits and pieces of different Shakespearean plays and combined to make a truly unique spin on King Lear told from the perspective of who?...the fool of course! Sex, lies, politics, witches what more could you want?!?!. Read if you love Shakespeare. Read it if you hate it. But don't read it you don't have a great offbeat and unconventional sense of humor. If comic suspense or perhaps comic intrigue exist as ways to describe a novel (and even if they don't) you will find yourself continuing to read simply because you "just gotta know" what going to happen.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Christopher Moore- Fool

    I thought the funniest novel I would read in 2009 was going to be "Supreme Courtship" by Christopher Buckley and it's funny still. But for downright spectacular writing, conception and follow-through, I cannot imagine anything topping Christopher Moore's "Fool." Briefly, the plot is that of King Lear, as told by, commented upon and altered by Lear's jester, Pocket of Dog Snogging. The infamous daughters, Regen and Goneril, are right and properly snogged, snagged, shagged, tossed, humped and ridden by any number of characters, most notably Pocket's friend and companion, "Drool," nicknamed that for obvious reasons. He is called a "Natural"-a fool born to be foolish because of mental impairment. Pocket is a self-made fool-and he makes anything that walks while Drool shags anything that has orifices-such as the oak trees with knotholes on the way to battle that he so enthusiastically shags that he supplies the country folk with a year's supply of acorns in one afternoon. And Cordelia is not left alone, either. She's in love with Pocket, of course, a perfect substitute for Jeff, her gay French husband. (Not in the dramatis personae of Shakespeare's version.)

    "Fool" is written as if it were a collaboration between Robin Williams, Monty Python and Stephen Colbert and is funny if you don't know either Shakespeare or Lear and even funnier if you do. Moore is not above awful puns and he wisely doesn't limit himself to the somewhat vague Middle Ages vocabulary or list of references. Mazda is mentioned, along with the ancient kingdom of "Merica" that may contribute a cheeseburger or two and various Shakespeare plays that are NOT Lear are quoted from liberally. The necessary witches live in Birnam Wood, of course, but they are from Macbeth, not Lear, and Hamlet gets into the plot as well, though he is too preoccupied to do much bonking. And there has to be a ghost. This is Shakespeare.

    It is impossible to select just one quote from the book to illustrate the humor and madness of the style but this is merely typical of the kind of quick turn and play on words and Shakespearean concepts that makes the engine of this novel run: One of the villains is confronted by Pocket and his dummy, Jones. The villain huffs: "I'll not have an exchange with an impudent fool."
    "He's not impudent," said Jones. "With proper inspiration, the lad sports a woody as stout as a mooring pin. Ask your lady."
    I nodded in agreement with the puppet, for he is most wise for having a brain of sawdust.
    "Impudent! Impudent! Not impotent!" Oswald frothing a bit now."

    And this is a mild case. Moore goes up to the edge of silliness many times but manages to pull back every time, just in time to make an even funnier point than silliness would have provided him. There is even a bit of pathos in the story, though I wouldn't recommend looking too hard for it. This novel is written by an author who loves to play with his craft and all his tools and who clearly has a remarkably good time doing it. For fun, belly-laughs and a classic example of how to write comic fiction with wit instead of mere cleverness, "Fool" is a perfect and valuable purchase.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Very Disapointing

    Not nearly as good any of his other books. Story line is terrible and difficult to understand. Had this been the first book of his read I would never read another.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 2, 2011

    Could not finish

    I love all of Christopher Moore's other books, but I couldn't finish this one. For me the archaic English and the vulgarity of the novel made it difficult to continue slogging through. I didn't find the constant use of really nasty vulgar words and situations funny. The plot was too serious to be funny.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2011

    His Best Book Ever!!

    If Monty Python's Flying Circus had ever done a performance of
    "King Lear", co-scripted by Douglas Adams (author of the "Hitchhikers"
    series), the result would exactly like "FOOL". It's one of the
    most hilarious parodies ever written (and I've read quite a few).
    And to those Shakespearian purists who imagine that Shakespeare
    is turning over in his grave, he probably is..laughing his ass off!
    (If said purists don't believe me, I suggest they read "Naughty
    Shakespeare", by Michael Macrone).

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Funny

    I probably would've done better in high school English is we read this. Anyone who loves satire and British comedy will surely enjoy this.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2010

    FOOL

    Such a good read, to bad I could not read any foot notes (B&N is working on that part of the new Nook). I would encourage anyone to read this book, if they have time to chuckle with or without a "Nuncle".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 14, 2009

    One of the worst books i've ever read

    I have read several of mr moore's previous books - and have enjoyed them - this one is just thrown together - loosely based on Shakespeare's King Lear. it's rude and crude with no redeeming values - in my opinion.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Next to Favorite from Christopher Moore

    I am a huge fan of this author and have read all of his work. This book ranks right behind "A Dirty Job" in my opinion. The author takes Shakespeare's King Lear play and loosely interprets it in his own unique style. If you have read Lamb/Biff-Christ's childhood friend, this has the same flavor. The story is told first person from the perspective of Pocket the King's Fool who is witty and sarcastic but seems to get away with all he attempts. It has many colorful characters and was a fun read. I tried to read it slow so I could enjoy the interplay between the characters. I didn't want to miss any of his dialog, as the author slides subtle insults and jokes in his story line throughout the book that way. I am always sorry when I end one of his books, and as usual I cannot wait until his next comes out. Definitely recommended reading!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 3, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    King Lear Made Fun?

    While not up to his book LAMB this is a jolly good read, don't let your parents read it though. Made me go back and reread King Lear and realize how good that Shakespeare guy was.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 2, 2009

    Not his best effort

    Having read all his books I would say that this was his worst effort. IT FELT TO ME THAT THIS WAS JUST THROWN TOGETHER.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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