Customer Reviews for

The Forensic Science of CSI

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
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(9)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Amazing!

2nd Nook book I bought. I'm also a huge CSI fan. This book is just amazing for any hardcore science fan like myself. LOVE this story(: I understood it completely. Annd I'm only 13!

posted by 1083681 on February 1, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Contains informational errors

I purchased several forensic science books this summer to help me prepare to teach a high school forensics course this fall. I was very disappointed with this one - I came across some sections that contained information that was sometimes questionable or awkwardly word...
I purchased several forensic science books this summer to help me prepare to teach a high school forensics course this fall. I was very disappointed with this one - I came across some sections that contained information that was sometimes questionable or awkwardly worded, to outright wrong, leaving me uncertain about trusting the rest. For example, on pg 88 the author is describing crime lab instruments. In her description of a stereo microscope she writes, "It relies on a light source at the base and a stage that holds the specimen. A hollow tube through which the viewer looks magnifies ... This works best with transparent objects, but can also bring out details if an opaque object is sliced sufficiently thin." It seems as if the author is confusing a compound microscope (with two eyepieces, maybe) with the stereo microscope. The compound microscope uses transillumination, thus the need for thin or transparent objects. A stereo microscope, however, uses incident light illumination (in other words, the light reflects off the object, it does not pass through it like the other scope.) This means that stereo microscopes are great for viewing surface details at low magnifications, providing 3-D viewing of OPAQUE, not translucent, objects. Stereo microscopes also lack a stage, which makes them easy to differentiate from a compound scope. Overall, the entire book is not terrible, but the author seems uncomfortable with her descriptions of the science behind the methods, especially the DNA sections. It was just surprising and disappointing to purchase a "reference" style book containing unreliable or uncertain information. Granted, many textbooks contain their fair share of occasional errors also, but had I known in advance, I would have chosen a different book for my classroom library.

posted by 2521866 on September 6, 2011

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  • Posted September 6, 2011

    Contains informational errors

    I purchased several forensic science books this summer to help me prepare to teach a high school forensics course this fall. I was very disappointed with this one - I came across some sections that contained information that was sometimes questionable or awkwardly worded, to outright wrong, leaving me uncertain about trusting the rest. For example, on pg 88 the author is describing crime lab instruments. In her description of a stereo microscope she writes, "It relies on a light source at the base and a stage that holds the specimen. A hollow tube through which the viewer looks magnifies ... This works best with transparent objects, but can also bring out details if an opaque object is sliced sufficiently thin." It seems as if the author is confusing a compound microscope (with two eyepieces, maybe) with the stereo microscope. The compound microscope uses transillumination, thus the need for thin or transparent objects. A stereo microscope, however, uses incident light illumination (in other words, the light reflects off the object, it does not pass through it like the other scope.) This means that stereo microscopes are great for viewing surface details at low magnifications, providing 3-D viewing of OPAQUE, not translucent, objects. Stereo microscopes also lack a stage, which makes them easy to differentiate from a compound scope. Overall, the entire book is not terrible, but the author seems uncomfortable with her descriptions of the science behind the methods, especially the DNA sections. It was just surprising and disappointing to purchase a "reference" style book containing unreliable or uncertain information. Granted, many textbooks contain their fair share of occasional errors also, but had I known in advance, I would have chosen a different book for my classroom library.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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